Gunpoint (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Gunpoint
Directed by Earl Bellamy
Produced by Gordon Kay
Written by Mary Willingham
Willard W. Willingham
Starring Audie Murphy
Joan Staley
Warren Stevens
Music by Hans J. Salter
Cinematography William Marguiles
Edited by Russell F. Schoengarth
Production
company
Universal Pictures
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date
  • April 6, 1966 (1966-04-06) (Los Angeles)
  • April 27, 1966 (1966-04-27) (United States)
Running time
86 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $500,000[1]

Gunpoint is a 1966 Technicolor Western film directed by Earl Bellamy starring Audie Murphy, Joan Staley and Warren Stevens.[2]

Plot[edit]

In a small town in 1880s Colorado, a gang of outlaws led by Drago (Morgan Woodward) rob a bank and kidnap a saloon singer, Uvalde (Joan Staley). The sheriff, Chad Lucas (Audie Murphy), forms a posse to take off after them, which includes Uvalde's fiancé, Nate Harlan (Warren Stevens), a young kid, and Lucas's deputy (Denver Pyle), who is secretly in league with the outlaws. During the chase, Nate realises that Chad and Uvalde used to be lovers. The posse battles Indians, horse thieves and conflicts among themselves before discovering Uvalde and defeating the gang.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The film was the last of seven Westerns Audie Murphy made with producer Gordon Kay starting with Hell Bent for Leather (1960).[1] Parts of the film were shot at Kanab Canyon in Utah.[3]

When Hedda Hopper asked him what the story was about, he told her "Same story only we're getting older horses".[4] After making the movie, Murphy went to work in Europe for a number of years.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Don Graham, No Name on the Bullet: The Biography of Audie Murphy, Penguin, 1989 p 291
  2. ^ Gunpoint at the Audie Murphy Memorial Site
  3. ^ D'Arc, James V. (2010). When Hollywood came to town: a history of moviemaking in Utah (1st ed.). Layton, Utah: Gibbs Smith. ISBN 9781423605874. 
  4. ^ Hedda Hopper, 'Audie Murphy to Invade Europe', Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 03 Apr 1965: 17.

External links[edit]