Gurdwara Sahib of San Jose

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Gurdwara Sahib of San Jose
Sikh Gurdwara, San Jose. View from south-west (cropped).jpg
Front of Sikh Gurdwara - San Jose
Religion
AffiliationSikhism
Location
LocationSan Jose, California, USA
Architecture
StyleSikh architecture
Completed1985
Website
Official website

The Sikh Gurdwara of San Jose is a gurdwara (a Sikh place of worship) located in the Evergreen district of San Jose, California. It was founded in 1984 by leaders of the then-rapidly growing community of Sikhs in Silicon Valley.[1] It is the largest Gurdwara in North America, it is also the largest Gurdwara outside India.[2][3]

History[edit]

The gurdwara's cascade fountain.

Initially, the community met in a rented community center, but soon bought a small building in east San Jose. After buying nearby land in 1995, they decided it would be too expensive to build in the city limits, so they sold that land and bought a larger property further east. The first phase of the project of almost 20,000 square feet (1,900 m2) was completed in 2004.

The second phase was completed in April 2011,[4] making it the largest gurdwara in North America[5] at 90,000 square feet (8,400 m2). The chief architect and designer of the project is the late Malkiat Singh Sidhu. The largest audience at the San Jose Gurdwara was on opening day when some 20,000 people were thought to have come.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sikh Gurdwara Sahib - San Jose, CA (Official Website)". www.sanjosegurdwara.org. Retrieved 2021-03-22.
  2. ^ "Sikh Gurdwara Sahib". San Jose. Retrieved 2021-03-22.
  3. ^ Feb 15, Yudhvir Rana / TNN / Updated; 2018; Ist, 07:39. "San Jose Gurdwara: Biggest gurdwara in North America says Indian officials are welcome | Amritsar News - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 2021-03-22.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  4. ^ Rodriguez, Joe (August 12, 2016) [May 29, 2015]. "Power struggle at Sikh temple in San Jose". The Mercury News.
  5. ^ Pellissier, Hank (2010-06-19). "Sikh Gurdwara Sahib Temple". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-08-21.

External links[edit]