Guriev porridge

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Guriev porridge

Guryev porridge (Guriev kasha) is a Russian porridge (kasha) dessert dish prepared from semolina and milk with the addition of nuts (hazelnut, walnuts, almonds), kaimak (creamy foams) and dried fruits.[1][2][3] Traditional preparation of the dish involves preparing milk skins and separating the dish's ingredients by layers with the skin between each layer.[4] It is considered a traditional dish of Russian cuisine, but it was invented only at the beginning of the 19th century.

History[edit]

The name of Guriev porridge comes from the name of Count Dmitry Alexandrovich Guriev (1751–1825), Minister of Finance and member of the State Council of the Russian Empire.[1]

It has been stated that Guryev porridge was invented by Zakhar Kuzmin, a serf chef of the retired major of the Orenburg dragoon regiment Georgy Jurisovsky, who was visited by Guryev. Subsequently, Guriev bought Kuzmin with his family and made him a regular chef in his court. According to another version, Guryev himself came up with a recipe for porridge.[1]

It was a beloved dish of Emperor Alexander III.[1] Prior to the October 17, 1888 train crash that Alexander III was on, the emperor was served this dish for dessert.[1] When the waiter came to the emperor to pour the cream, a terrible blow occurred, and the train derailed.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Goldstein, D.; Mintz, S. (2015). The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets. Oxford University Press. p. 597. ISBN 978-0-19-931362-4. Retrieved July 22, 2017. 
  2. ^ Schillinger, Liesl (September 13, 2013). "The Sickle of Plenty: Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking". The Daily Beast. Retrieved July 22, 2017. 
  3. ^ Molokhovets, E.; Toomre, J. (1998). Classic Russian Cooking: Elena Molokhovets' a Gift to Young Housewives. Indiana-Michigan Series in Rus. Indiana University Press. p. 334. ISBN 978-0-253-21210-8. Retrieved July 22, 2017. 
  4. ^ Goldstein, D. (1999). A Taste of Russia: A Cookbook of Russian Hospitality. Russian Life Books. pp. 87–88. ISBN 978-1-880100-42-4. Retrieved July 22, 2017.