Gus Meins

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Gus Meins
Born
Gustave Peter Ludwig Luley

(1893-03-06)March 6, 1893
DiedAugust 1, 1940(1940-08-01) (aged 47)
Cause of deathSuicide
OccupationFilm director
Years active1922 - 1940

Gus Meins (March 6, 1893 – August 1, 1940 as Gustave Peter Ludwig Luley) was a German-American film director. He was born in Frankfurt, Germany.

Career[edit]

Meins started out in the 'teens as a cartoonist for the Los Angeles Evening Herald before becoming a comedy writer for Fox in 1919.[1]

In the 1920s, Meins directed a number of silent short subjects film series for Universal Pictures, including the Buster Brown comedies.[2] He is best known as senior director of Hal Roach's Our Gang comedies from 1934 to 1936, and also as director of Laurel and Hardy's Babes in Toyland (1934).[1] His assistant director was a young Gordon Douglas, who became senior director in 1936 when Meins left Our Gang for other directing jobs at Roach. Meins left Roach in 1937 over creative differences.

Death[edit]

In the summer of 1940, Meins faced prosecution of "morals charges", having been accused of sex offenses against six youths. He left home on the night of Thursday, August 1 telling his son, Douglas: "You probably won't see me again." Meins was found dead in his car on August 4, reportedly having committed suicide by inhaling carbon monoxide days earlier.[3]

He was generally remembered as 'as a cheerful, convivial gentleman'.[1] His son Douglas Meins (1918–1987) appeared in at least seven Republic and Warner films in the late 1930s-early 1940s; he then served in the U.S. Army Corps during World War II. [4]

Selected filmography[edit]

Feature films:

Our Gang shorts:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Gus Meins". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved 28 November 2018.
  2. ^ "Most Popular "Buster Brown Series" Titles". Internet Movie Database. IMDB.com. Retrieved 28 November 2018.
  3. ^ "Movie Director Named In Morals Case Suicide". Reading Eagle. Reading, California. AP. August 5, 1940. p. 15. Retrieved September 11, 2011.
  4. ^ "Douglas Meins". Internet Movie Database. IMDB.com. Retrieved 28 November 2018.

External links[edit]