Gymir

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In Norse mythology, Gymir was a giant whose daughter, Gerðr, married the god Freyr.

According to the Eddic poems Skírnismál and Hyndluljóð, Gymir and his wife Aurboða are Gerð's and her brother Beli's parents.[1] He is also listed as a distinct cousin to Thjazi. In the Prose Edda, Snorri Sturluson gave this information in Gylfaginning but in a list of kennings in Skáldskaparmál equates Gymir with the god and giant Ægir,[2] citing a verse by Hofgarða-Refr Gestsson where the kenning in question probably simply substitutes one giant-name for another.[3] Gymir is also equated with Ægir in the prose introduction to Lokasenna; however, the Nafnaþulur added later to the Prose Edda list him among the giants. He is credited to live in a great house in Jotunheim surrounded by dogs.[4] Gymir has usually been interpreted as a sea-giant, but Magnus Olsen regarded him as an earth giant in connection with his interpretation of Skírnismál in light of the hieros gamos[5] and he has also been seen as a chthonic deity.[6] Suggestions as to the etymology and meaning of his name include 'earthman', 'the wintry one', 'the protector' and 'the bellower'.[7]

According to John Lindow, one source calls Gerð's father Geysir.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Facts on File Incorporated (2009). Norse Mythology A-Z (3rd ed.). Infobase Publishing. p. 44. Retrieved 13 November 2015. 
  2. ^ John Lindow, Norse Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Heroes, Rituals, and Beliefs, Santa Barbara, California: ABC-Clio, 2001, repr. Oxford University Press, 2002, ISBN 0-19-515382-0, p. 156.
  3. ^ Rudolf Simek, Dictionary of Northern Mythology, tr. Angela Hall, Cambridge: Brewer, 1993, repr. 2000, ISBN 0-85991-513-1, p. 126.
  4. ^ Facts on File Incorporated (2009). Norse Mythology A-Z (3rd ed.). Infobase Publishing. p. 44. Retrieved 13 November 2015. 
  5. ^ "Fra gammelnorsk myte og kultus", Maal og Minne 1 (1909) 17-36, p. 21 (Norwegian); Jan de Vries, Altgermanische Religionsgeschichte, volume 1, 2nd ed. Berlin: de Gruyter, 1956, repr. 1970, p. 251, note 1 (German)
  6. ^ de Vries, volume 2, 2nd ed. 1957, repr. 1970, p. 180, note 1.
  7. ^ Simek, p. 127.
  8. ^ Lindow, p. 138, "Geyser".