Héctor Zelada

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This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Zelada and the second or maternal family name is Bertoqui.
Héctor Zelada
Personal information
Full name Héctor Miguel Zelada Bertoqui
Date of birth (1957-04-30) April 30, 1957 (age 59)
Place of birth Maciel, Santa Fe, Argentina
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Playing position Goalkeeper
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1976–1978 Rosario Central 92 (0)
1978–1987 América 294 (0)
1988–1990 Atlante 58 (0)
Total 432 (0)
National team
1986 Argentina
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Héctor Miguel Zelada Bertoqui (born April 30, 1957) is a former Argentine football goalkeeper. He started his career at Rosario Central but he played mostly in Mexico, for Club América.[1] He was the third-choice goalkeeper for the Argentina side that won the 1986 FIFA World Cup.

Career[edit]

Héctor Miguel Zelada began his career with Rosario Central in 1976, making 92 appearances. In 1978, 20-year-old Zelada made a move to Mexico City club América. He would make his debut in a league match against Guadalajara on 4 March 1979. The match ended in a 0–0 draw. He won his first league title with América during the 1983–84 season, having a standout performance against Guadalajara in the second-leg of the final, with the score 0–0 after the first-leg. In the second-leg, América was down 0–1 when Zelada committed a foul in the penalty area. He subsequently saved Eduardo Cisneros' penalty kick. América would go on to win the final 3–1.

Zelada would go on to win the 1984–85 and the Prode-85 championships with América and play in over 250 matches for the club. His final match was a 1–1 draw against León in 1990. He would move to Atlante F.C. that same year, playing in 58 matches before officially retiring in 1992.

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

América

International[edit]

Argentina

Individual[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Héctor ZeladaLiga MX stats at MedioTiempo.com (Spanish)

External links[edit]