H. Lee Moffitt

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H. Lee Moffitt
Moffitt2 (cropped).jpg
Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives
In office
1982–1984
Preceded byRalph Haben
Succeeded byJames Harold Thompson
Personal details
Born (1941-11-10) November 10, 1941 (age 77)
Tampa, Florida
Political partyDemocratic Party
Spouse(s)Dianne Davant Moffitt[1]
ChildrenJennifer Leigh
ProfessionAttorney

H. Lee Moffitt (born November 10, 1941) is an American politician and attorney. He served as Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives from 1982 to 1984.

Early life and education[edit]

Moffitt was born in Tampa, Florida[2] on November 10, 1941 to Clara and B. B. Moffitt, a ship welder.[3][4] He attended Henry B. Plant High School in Tampa, graduating in 1959.[3][4]:11 He later obtained his Bachelor of Arts from the University of South Florida in 1964 and his Juris Doctor from Cumberland School of Law in 1967.[2][4]:11

Career[edit]

Moffitt was elected to the Florida House in 1974, serving Tampa, Florida. He served as Democratic member of the Florida House of Representatives,[5] holding various positions throughout his ten years of service there.[3][6] In 1976 he was selected as the Most Effective First-Term House member[3] and presented with the Allen Morris Award by the Florida Times-Union.[2] From 1978 to 1980 he chaired the Commerce Committee, and the House Reapportionment Committee from 1980 to 1982.[6] He was again selected by St. Petersburg Times (now Tampa Bay Times) as the "most Effective Member of the House" in 1982, as Chairman of the House Reapportionment Committee.[5][7] In November 1982, he was elected Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives and served in this capacity until 1984.[2] He retired from the legislature in 1984 to return to the practice of law.[4]:27

During his legislative career he passed constitutional resolutions that created a merit selection process for the Florida Appellate Judiciary[8] and granting Floridians a right to privacy. Both constitutional amendments were approved by Florida voters. He also led the effort to pass the Water Quality and Assurance Act of 1983,[9] and the Growth Management Act of 1985.[4][10]

Moffitt serves on the board of the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute[11] and on the Board of M2Gen, a for-profit subsidiary of the Moffitt Cancer Center.[12] He was also the first University of South Florida alumni to be presented with the Distinguished Alumni Award in 1976.[13][14]

H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute[edit]

While a member of the house of representative, Moffitt spearheaded a project to build a cancer treatment center in Florida.[11] Moffitt had been diagnosed with a malignant tumor in his left knee at age 29, for which he did a tumor resection.[4]:11 It was this experience, along with the death of friends, Joseph Lumia, Judy Barnett and George Edgecomb, from cancer, that motivated Moffitt to lobby for a cancer treatment center in Tampa.[4]:14 He secured an initial $70-million via the Legislature for the commencement of the construction.[11]

The H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute officially opened on October 27, 1986, three years after its groundbreaking.[6] Despite Moffitt's objection, the Florida legislature voted to name the facility in his honor.[4]:29[11] In 2006 he was honored by the Association of Community Cancer Centers' (ACCC) Annual Achievement Award for his commitment to combating cancer through the center he founded.[15] Since its founding the center has expanded its services and was designated an NCI Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2001.[3][4]

Personal life[edit]

Moffitt is married to Dianne Davant Moffitt.[1][3]:7

Awards and recognition[edit]

  • Lifetime Achievement Award from BioFlorida – 2017[16]
  • Lifetime Achievement Award from Leadership Florida – 2013[17]
  • Annual Achievement Award from the Association of Community Cancer Centers – 2006.[15]
  • Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of South Florida – 1976[13]
  • Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the Florida Board of Regents[13]
  • National Achievement Award from Association of Community Cancer Centers[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2007 Magnolia Ball – A benefit for the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute in Tampa". Retrieved January 27, 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d "Representative H. Lee Moffitt". Retrieved January 19, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Barrs, Jennifer (July 24, 2005). "Cancer's Nemesis". The Tampa Tribune. p. 6.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute (2011). Moffitt Cancer Center: 25 Years: A Bold Beginning, a Boundless Future. Karen S. Rissler. p. 10. ISBN 9780615425030.
  5. ^ a b "Moffitt wins 'most effective' award". The Ledger. April 22, 1983.
  6. ^ a b c "H. Lee Moffitt". Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  7. ^ "St. Petersburg Times ends annual awards to 'most valuable' legislators". St. Petersburg Times. June 7, 1983. p. 2B.
  8. ^ Moffitt, H. Lee (October 4, 2012). "H. Lee Moffitt: Courts should be off-limits to partisan politics". Retrieved February 16, 2014.
  9. ^ DeFord, Susan (July 13, 1983). "House passes water bill". Democrat Capital Bureau.
  10. ^ "Moffitt urges impact fee for new construction". Lakeland Ledger. April 16, 1983.
  11. ^ a b c d "H. Lee Moffitt". Archived from the original on February 26, 2014. Retrieved January 19, 2014.
  12. ^ Albright, Mark (March 17, 2012). "Moffitt research offspring moves beyond cancer". Tampa Bay Times.
  13. ^ a b c d "Meet our 40 in 40 Outstanding Alumni" (PDF). AlumniVoice: 20. October 2009.
  14. ^ "Nominations for Annual Alumni Awards: Distinguished Alumnus Award (Recipients)". Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  15. ^ a b "H. Lee Moffitt to Receive Association of Community Cancer Centers' Annual Achievement Award". Archived from the original on March 4, 2014. Retrieved January 19, 2014.
  16. ^ "Lifetime Achievement Award BioFlorida". Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  17. ^ "Distinguished Member Award". Retrieved February 16, 2014.