H. Wildon Carr

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Herbert Wildon Carr (16 January 1857 – 8 July 1931) was a British philosopher, Professor of Philosophy, King's College, London from 1918 until 1925 and Visiting Professor at the University of Southern California from 1925 until his death[when?].

He was a student at King's College London where he was awarded the Jelf Medal[further explanation needed].

Works[edit]

  • Henri Bergson: the philosophy of change, London: Jack, 1911
  • The Problem of Truth, New York: Dodge, 1913
  • The Philosophy of Benedetto Croce, London: Macmillan, 1917
  • The General Principle of Relativity in Its Philosophical and Historical Aspect, London: Macmillan, 1922
  • L'Énergie spirituelle, Translated by H. Wildon Carr as Mind-Energy: Lectures and Essays, London: Macmillan, 1920
  • A Theory of Monads: Outlines of the Philosophy of the Principle of Relativity, London: Macmillan, 1922
  • Scientific Approach to Philosophy: Selected Essays and Reviews, London: Macmillan, 1924
  • Changing Backgrounds in Religion and Ethics: A Metaphysical Meditation, New York: Macmillan, 1927
  • The Unique Status of Man, in, American Journal of Sociology, 1928
  • The Freewill Problem, London: Benn Ltd., 1928
  • Leibniz, Boston: Little Brown, 1929

References[edit]

External links[edit]