HD 109271

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HD 109271
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Virgo
Right ascension  12h 33m 35.5543s[1]
Declination −11° 37′ 18.7272″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 8.05 ± 0.01[2]
Characteristics
Spectral type G5 V[2]
B−V color index +0.658 ± 0.002[2]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv)−5.10 ± 0.3[3] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: −169.693±0.114[1] mas/yr
Dec.: 80.882±0.108[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π)17.8697 ± 0.0660[1] mas
Distance182.5 ± 0.7 ly
(56.0 ± 0.2 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV)4.1 ± 0.1[2]
Details[2]
Mass1.047 ± 0.024 M
Luminosity2.0 ± 0.3 L
Surface gravity (log g)4.28 ± 0.10 cgs
Temperature5783 ± 62 K
Metallicity [Fe/H]0.10 ± 0.05 dex
Rotational velocity (v sin i)2.7 km/s
Age7.3 ± 1.2 Gyr
Other designations
BD−10° 3494, HIP 61300, SAO 157362, LTT 4770
Database references
SIMBADdata
Exoplanet Archivedata
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data

HD 109271 is a star in the constellation of Virgo. With an apparent magnitude of 8.05,[2] it cannot be seen with the naked eye. Parallax measurements made by Gaia put the star at a distance of 182 light-years (56.0 parsecs) away.[1]

HD 109271 is a typical G-type main-sequence star. It has a mass of 1.047 M, but is twice as luminous as the Sun. It is also much older, at an age of 7.3 billion years.[2]

Planetary system[edit]

From 2003 to 2012, the star was under observance from the High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS).[2]

In 2012, two eccentric hot Neptune-mass planets were deduced by radial velocity. They were published in January 2013. These are close to a 1:4 resonance. The system is like HD 69830.

A third Neptune in the Venus zone was hypothesised from the data.

The HD 109271 planetary system[4][2]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b >0.054 ± 0.004 MJ 0.079 ± 0.001 7.8543 ± 0.0009 0.25 ± 0.08
c >0.076 ± 0.007 MJ 0.196 ± 0.003 30.93 ± 0.02 0.15 ± 0.09
d (unconfirmed) >1.3 neptune MJ 1 430 0.36

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Brown, A. G. A.; et al. (Gaia collaboration) (August 2018). "Gaia Data Release 2: Summary of the contents and survey properties". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 616. A1. arXiv:1804.09365. Bibcode:2018A&A...616A...1G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201833051. Gaia DR2 record for this source at VizieR.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i G. Lo Curto; et al. (2013). "The HARPS search for southern extrasolar planets: XXXVI. New multi-planet systems in the HARPS volume limited sample: a super-Earth and a Neptune in the habitable zone". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 551: A59. arXiv:1301.2741. Bibcode:2013A&A...551A..59L. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201220415.
  3. ^ Gontcharov, G. A. (2006). "Pulkovo Compilation of Radial Velocities for 35 495 Hipparcos stars in a common system". Astronomy Letters. 32 (11): 759–771. arXiv:1606.08053. Bibcode:2006AstL...32..759G. doi:10.1134/S1063773706110065.
  4. ^ "Planet HD 109271 b". The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia. Retrieved 3 September 2017.