HD 231701

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HD 231701
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Sagitta
Right ascension 19h 32m 04.161s[1]
Declination +16° 28′ 27.45″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 8.97
Characteristics
Spectral type F8V
Astrometry
Proper motion (μ) RA: 63.85 ± 0.89[1] mas/yr
Dec.: 16.46 ± 0.85[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 8.44 ± 1.05[1] mas
Distance approx. 390 ly
(approx. 120 pc)
Details
Mass 1.15 ± 0.08[2] M
Surface gravity (log g) 4.37 ± 0.03[2] cgs
Temperature 6224 ± 27[2] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] 0.04 ± 0.02[2] dex
Other designations
HIP 96078, BD+16° 3883, SAO 104946[3]
Database references
SIMBAD data

HD 231701 is a yellow-white dwarf star approximately 390 light years away in the constellation of Sagitta. It is a 9th magnitude star, meaning the star is not visible to the naked eye, but powerful binoculars or a small telescope is needed to view the star. It is an F-type main-sequence star, a type of hydrogen-fusing star that is hotter, more massive, and brighter than our Sun.

Planetary system[edit]

In 2007, the N2K Consortium used the radial velocity technique to discover a Jupiter-like planet orbiting at 0.55 AU around the star.[4]

The HD 231701 planetary system[4]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b >1.08 MJ 0.55 142 ± 2.8 0.19 ± 0.05

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752Freely accessible. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357.  Vizier catalog entry
  2. ^ a b c d Santos, N. C.; et al. (2013). "SWEET-Cat: A catalogue of parameters for Stars With ExoplanETs". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 556. A150. arXiv:1307.0354Freely accessible. Bibcode:2013A&A...556A.150S. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201321286. 
  3. ^ "HD 231701 -- Star". SIMBAD Astronomical Database. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2014-10-16. 
  4. ^ a b Fischer, Debra A.; et al. (2007). "Five Intermediate-Period Planets from the N2K Sample". The Astrophysical Journal. 669 (2): 1336–1344. arXiv:0704.1191Freely accessible. Bibcode:2007ApJ...669.1336F. doi:10.1086/521869. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: Sky map 19h 32m 04.1611s, +16° 28′ 27.444″