HD 37605

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HD 37605
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Orion
Right ascension 05h 40m 01.729s[1]
Declination +06° 03′ 38.08″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 8.69
Astrometry
Proper motion (μ) RA: 53.15 ± 1.29[1] mas/yr
Dec.: −246.44 ± 0.84[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 22.74 ± 1.11[1] mas
Distance 143 ± 7 ly
(44 ± 2 pc)
Characteristics
Spectral type K0 V
Details
Mass 0.98 ± 0.01[2] M
Radius 0.89 ± 0.01[2] R
Luminosity 0.602 ± 0.002[2] L
Surface gravity (log g) 4.52 ± 0.01[2] cgs
Temperature 5380 ± 13[2] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] 0.34 dex
Rotation 57.67 days
Age 1.8 ± 1.0[2] Gyr
Other designations
BD+05° 985, HIP 26664, LTT 11695, SAO 113015
Database references
SIMBAD data
Exoplanet Archive data
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data

HD 37605 is an orange dwarf star located approximately 143 light years away[1] in the constellation Orion. It formed about 7 billion years ago and is inactive.[3]

There are two giant planets known in orbit. Planet b was discovered in 2004[4] and planet c was discovered eight years later. The planets do not transit relative to Earth; b's maximum inclination is 88.1%.[3][5]

In a simulation, HD 37605 b's orbit "sweeps clean" most test particles within 0.5 AU; leaving only asteroids "in low-eccentricity orbits near the known planet’s apastron distance, near the 1:2 mean-motion resonance" with oscillating eccentricity up to 0.06, and also at 1:3 with oscillating eccentricity up to 0.4. Also, observation has ruled out planets heavier than 0.7 Jupiter mass with a period of one year or less; which still allows for planets at 0.8 AU or more.[6]

The HD 37605 planetary system[5]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b ≥2.813 ± 0.032 MJ 0.2837 ± 0.0016 55.01307 ± 0.00063 0.6767 ± 0.0019
c ≥3.379 ± 0.038 MJ 3.821 ± 0.022 2720 ± 58 0.013 ± 0.015

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752Freely accessible. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. Vizier catalog entry
  2. ^ a b c d e f Bonfanti, A.; et al. (2015). "Revising the ages of planet-hosting stars". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 575. A18. arXiv:1411.4302Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015A&A...575A..18B. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201424951. 
  3. ^ a b WANG Sh.; et al. (2012). "The Discovery of HD 37605c and a Dispositive Null Detection of Transits of HD 37605b". Astrophysical Journal. 761: 46. arXiv:1210.6985Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...761...46W. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/1/46. 
  4. ^ Cochran, Michael; et al. (2004). "The First Hobby-Eberly Telescope Planet: A Companion to HD 37605". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 611 (2): L133–L136. arXiv:astro-ph/0407146Freely accessible. Bibcode:2004ApJ...611L.133C. doi:10.1086/423936. 
  5. ^ a b S. Kane (2012). "The TERMS Project: More Than Just Transit Exclusion". OASIS. 44 (228.07). 
  6. ^ Wittenmyer; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Levison, Harold F. (2007). "Dynamical and Observational Constraints on Additional Planets in Highly Eccentric Planetary Systems". The Astronomical Journal. 134 (3): 1276–1284. arXiv:0706.1962Freely accessible. Bibcode:2007AJ....134.1276W. doi:10.1086/520880. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: Sky map 05h 40m 01.7296s, +06° 03′ 38.085″