HD 69830 b

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HD 69830 b
Exoplanet List of exoplanets
Parent star
Star HD 69830
Constellation Puppis
Right ascension (α) 08h 18m 23.947s[1]
Declination (δ) −12° 37′ 55.81″[1]
Apparent magnitude (mV) 5.95
Distance 40.7 ± 0.2[1] ly
(12.49 ± 0.05[1] pc)
Spectral type G8V
Mass (m) 0.86 ± 0.03 M
Radius (r) 0.89 R
Temperature (T) 5385 ± 20 K
Metallicity [Fe/H] −0.05 ± 0.02
Age 5.1–6.1 Gyr
Orbital elements
Semi-major axis (a) 0.0785 AU
Eccentricity (e) 0.1 ± 0.04
Orbital period (P) 8.667 ± 0.003 d
Argument of
periastron
(ω) 340 ± 26°
Time of periastron (T0) 2,453,496.8 ± 0.06 JD
Semi-amplitude (K) 3.51 ± 0.15 m/s
Physical characteristics
Minimum mass (m sin i) 0.033 MJ
Temperature (T) ~804
Discovery information
Discovery date May 18, 2006
Discoverer(s) Lovis et al.[2]
Discovery method Radial velocity
Discovery status Published[2]
Database references
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data
SIMBAD data
Exoplanet Archive data
Open Exoplanet Catalogue data

HD 69830 b is a Neptune-mass or super-Earth-mass exoplanet orbiting the star HD 69830. It is 10 times more massive than Earth. It also orbits very close to its parent star and takes 82/3 days to complete an orbit.

This is likely to be a rocky planet, not a gas giant.[2] If it had formed as a gas giant, it would have stayed that way.[3]

If HD 69830 b is a terrestrial planet, models predict that tidal heating would produce a heat flux at the surface of about 55 W/m2. This is 20 times that of Io.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752Freely accessible. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. Vizier catalog entry
  2. ^ a b c Lovis, Christophe; et al. (2006). "An extrasolar planetary system with three Neptune-mass planets" (PDF). Nature. 441 (7091): 305–309. arXiv:astro-ph/0703024Freely accessible. Bibcode:2006Natur.441..305L. doi:10.1038/nature04828. PMID 16710412. 
  3. ^ H. Lammer; et al. (2007). "The impact of nonthermal loss processes on planet masses from Neptunes to Jupiters" (PDF). Geophysical Research Abstracts. 9 (07850). 
  4. ^ Jackson, Brian; Richard Greenberg; Rory Barnes (2008). "Tidal Heating of Extra-Solar Planets". ApJ. 681 (2): 1631. arXiv:0803.0026Freely accessible. Bibcode:2008ApJ...681.1631J. doi:10.1086/587641. 

Coordinates: Sky map 08h 18m 23.9s, −12° 37′ 55.8″