HMS Alnwick Castle (K405)

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HMS Alnwick Castle 1944 IWM FL 509.jpg
Alnwick Castle in November 1944
History
Royal Navy EnsignUnited Kingdom
Name: HMS Alnwick Castle
Namesake: Alnwick Castle
Laid down: 12 June 1943
Launched: 23 May 1944
Commissioned: 11 November 1944
Identification: Pennant number: K405
Fate: Scrapped in 1958
General characteristics
Class and type: Castle-class corvette
Displacement: 1,060 tons
Length: 252 ft (77 m)
Beam: 37 ft (11 m)
Draught: 10 ft (3.0 m)
Propulsion: 2 water tube boilers, 1 four cylinder triple expansion steam engine driving a single screw 2,750 hp (2 MW)
Speed: 16.5 knots (30.6 km/h; 19.0 mph) maximum, 10 knots (19 km/h) cruising
Range: 9,500 nautical miles at 10 knots (17,600 km at 19 km/h)
Complement: 112
Sensors and
processing systems:
Radar - Type 272 originally, Sonar - Types 144Q and 147B originally
Armament:
  • 1 × 4-inch Quick Firing Mk.XIX High Angle/Low Angle combined air/surface gun
  • 1 × Squid Anti-submarine mortar
  • 1 × depth charge rail, 15 depth charges
  • 2 × 20 mm twin anti-aircraft cannon
  • 6 × 20 mm single anti-aircraft cannon

HMS Alnwick Castle was a Castle-class corvette of the United Kingdom's Royal Navy. She was named after Alnwick Castle in Northumberland.

She was laid down on 12 June 1943 and launched by George Brown and Company at Greenock in Scotland on 23 May 1944. She was commissioned on 11 November 1944 and served as a convoy escort until the end of the Second World War.

From 20 July 1944 to mid 1945, the Alnwick Castle was commanded by Herbert Arthur Stonehouse (DSO and bar).[1]

After the war, she was placed in reserve at Portsmouth where she remained until she was transferred to the reserve at Harwich in 1950 and thence to West Hartlepool until 1958 when she was scrapped. She arrived at Gateshead for scrapping on 9 December 1958.

References and sources[edit]

References
  1. ^ Herbert Arthur Stonehouse DSC, RNR. uboat.net Retrieved 4 November 2015.
Sources