French frigate Désirée (1796)

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Dart & Desiree.jpg
Capture of Désirée by HMS Dart
History
French Navy EnsignFrance
Name: Désirée
Ordered: 19 March 1794
Builder: Dunkirk
Laid down: 10 February 1794
Launched: 23 April 1796
History
RN EnsignUnited Kingdom
Name: HMS Desiree
Acquired: 8 July 1800 by capture
Fate: Sold 22 August 1832
General characteristics [1][2]
Class and type: Romaine class frigate
Displacement: 700 tonnes
Tons burthen: 10165094 (bm)
Length: 45.5 m (149 ft)
Beam: 11.8 m (39 ft)
Draught: 5 m (16 ft)
Propulsion: Sail
Complement:
  • French:340
  • HMS: 264
Armament:
  • French
    • Original:24 × 24-pounder guns (upper deck) + 16 × 8-pounder guns (spar deck)
    • Later:24 × 18-pounder guns + 12 × 8-pounder guns + 4 × 36-pounder obusier de vaisseau
  • HMS
    • Upper deck:26 × 18-pounder guns
    • QD:2 × 9-pounder guns + 8 × 32-pounder carronades
    • Fc:2 × 9-pounder guns + 2 × 32-pounder carronades
Armour: Timber

Désirée was a Romaine-class frigate of the French Navy. The British Royal Navy captured her in 1800 and took her into service under her existing name. she was laid up in 1815, converted to a slop ship in 1823, and sold in 1832.

Capture[edit]

HMS Dart, under Patrick Campbell, captured Désirée on 8 July 1800 in the Raid on Dunkirk.[3] Many British vessels shared in the proceeds of the capture.[4]

British career[edit]

On 7 May 1813, she was under the command of Captain Arthur Farquarh when she captured the American schooner Decatur.[Note 1]

On 17 July 1813 she captured the French privateer Esperance.[Note 2]

Fate[edit]

Desiree was laid up at Sheerness in August 1815. Between January and November 1823 she was fitted as a slop ship. She was sold for £2,020 on 22 August 1832 to Joseph Christie at Rotherhithe.[2]

Notes, citations and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A first-class share of the prize money was worth £187 11sd; a sixth-class share, that of an ordinary seaman, was worth £1 12s 5¼d.[5]
  2. ^ A first-class share of the head money paid in October 1832 was worth £12 3s 6½d; a sixth-class share was worth 1s 1½d.[6]
Citations
  1. ^ Winfield and Roberts (2015), pp.105-6.
  2. ^ a b Winfield (2008), p. 162.
  3. ^ "No. 15274". The London Gazette. 5 July 1800. pp. 782–784. 
  4. ^ "No. 15297". The London Gazette. 27 September 1800. p. 1123. 
  5. ^ "No. 17025". The London Gazette. 17 June 1815. pp. 1171–1172. 
  6. ^ "No. 18981". The London Gazette. 2 October 1832. p. 2192. 
References
  • Roche, Jean-Michel (2005). Dictionnaire des bâtiments de la flotte de guerre française de Colbert à nos jours. 1. Group Retozel-Maury Millau. ISBN 978-2-9525917-0-6. OCLC 165892922. 
  • Winfield, Rif (2008). British Warships in the Age of Sail 1793–1817: Design, Construction, Careers and Fates. Seaforth. ISBN 1-86176-246-1. 
  • Winfield, Rif & Stephen S Roberts (2015) French Warships in the Age of Sail 1786 - 1861: Design Construction, Careers and Fates. (Seaforth Publishing). ISBN 9781848322042