HMS E12

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History
Name: HMS E12
Builder: HM Dockyard, Chatham
Cost: £101,900
Laid down: 16 December 1912
Commissioned: 14 October 1914
Fate: Sold, 7 March 1921
General characteristics
Class and type: E class submarine
Displacement:
  • 662 long tons (673 t) surfaced
  • 807 long tons (820 t) submerged
Length: 181 ft (55 m)
Beam: 15 ft (4.6 m)
Propulsion:
  • 2 × 800 hp (597 kW) diesels
  • 2 × 420 hp (313 kW) electric
  • 2 screws
Speed:
  • 15.25 knots (28.24 km/h; 17.55 mph) surfaced
  • 10.25 knots (18.98 km/h; 11.80 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 3,000 nmi (5,600 km) at 10 kn (19 km/h; 12 mph)
  • 65 nmi (120 km) at 5 kn (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph)
Complement: 30
Armament:

HMS E12 was a British E class submarine built by HM Dockyard, Chatham. She was laid down on 16 December 1912 and was commissioned on 14 October 1914. She cost £101,900.HMS E12 became trapped in anti-submarine nets in the Dardanelles. Her forward hydroplanes became entangled which sent her down to 245 feet. At the time, it was the greatest depth achieved by any British submarine.[citation needed] E12 managed to surface only to come under fire by shore batteries, but avoided further damage. HMS E12 survived the war, and was sold for scrap in Malta on 7 March 1921.[1]

Design[edit]

Like all post-E8 British E-class submarines, E12 had a displacement of 662 tonnes (730 short tons) at the surface and 807 tonnes (890 short tons) while submerged. She had a total length of 180 feet (55 m)[2] and a beam length of 22 feet 8.5 inches (6.922 m). She was powered by two 800 horsepower (600 kW) Vickers eight-cylinder two-stroke diesel engines and two 420 horsepower (310 kW) electric motors.[3][4] The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) and a submerged speed of 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph). British E-class submarines had fuel capacities of 50 tonnes (55 short tons) of diesel and ranges of 3,255 miles (5,238 km; 2,829 nmi) when travelling at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph).[2] E12 was capable of operating submerged for five hours when travelling at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph).

E12 was armed with a single 4-inch QF gun mounted forward of the conning tower, and five 18 inches (460 mm) torpedo tubes, two in the bow, one either side amidships, and one in the stern; a total of 10 torpedoes were carried.[3]

E-Class submarines had wireless systems with 1 kilowatt (1.3 hp) power ratings; in some submarines, these were later upgraded to 3 kilowatts (4.0 hp) systems by removing a midship torpedo tube. Their maximum design depth was 100 feet (30 m) although in service some reached depths of below 200 feet (61 m). Some submarines contained Fessenden oscillator systems.[2]

Crew[edit]

Her complement was three officers and 28 men.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hutchinson, Robert (2001). Jane's Submarines: War Beneath the Waves from 1776 to the Present Day. London: HarperCollins. ISBN 978-0-00-710558-8. OCLC 53783010. 
  2. ^ a b c d Innes McCartney; Tony Bryan (20 February 2013). British Submarines of World War I. Osprey Publishing. pp. 11–12. ISBN 978-1-4728-0035-0. 
  3. ^ a b Akerman, P. (1989). Encyclopaedia of British submarines 1901–1955.  p.150. Maritime Books. ISBN 1-904381-05-7
  4. ^ "E Class". Chatham Submarines. Retrieved 20 August 2015. 
  • Akerman, P. (1989). Encyclopaedia of British submarines 1901–1955.  p.150. Maritime Books. ISBN 1-904381-05-7