HMS Earnest (1896)

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For other ships with the same name, see HMS Earnest.
History
United Kingdom
Name: HMS Earnest
Builder: Laird, Son & Co., Birkenhead
Laid down: 2 March 1896
Launched: 7 November 1896
Completed: November 1897
Fate: Scrapped, 1920
General characteristics
Class and type: Earnest-class destroyer
Displacement: 395 long tons (401 t)
Length: 210 ft (64 m)
Beam: 21.5 ft (6.6 m)
Draught: 9.75 ft (3.0 m)
Propulsion:
Speed: 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph)
Complement: 63
Armament:

HMS Earnest was a B-class torpedo boat destroyer of the British Royal Navy, one of six to be built from the line.[1] She was completed by Laird, Son & Company, Birkenhead, in 1896, after 609 days of construction.[2] She was part of the new 30-knotters that were requested by the Admiralty, amid fears of foreign boats and their speeds the requirements were increased from 27 knots.[citation needed]

Design and construction[edit]

Earnest was ordered on 23 December 1896 as the first of six 30-knotter destroyers programmed to be built by Lairds under the 1895–1896 shipbuilding programme for the Royal Navy.[3] These followed on from four very similar destroyers ordered from Lairds as part of the 1894–1895 programme.[4]

Earnest was 218 feet (66.45 m) long overall and 213 feet (64.92 m) between perpendiculars, with a beam of 21 feet 6 inches (6.55 m) and a draught of 9 feet 9 inches (2.97 m). Displacement was 355 long tons (361 t) light and 415 long tons (422 t) full load. Like the other Laird-built 30-knotters, Locust was propelled by two triple expansion steam engines, fed by four Normand boilers, rated at 6,300 ihp (4,700 kW), and was fitted with four funnels.[4][5]

Armament was the standard for the 30-knotters, i.e. a QF 12 pounder 12 cwt (3 in (76 mm) calibre) gun on a platform on the ship's conning tower (in practice the platform was also used as the ship's bridge), with a secondary armament of five 6-pounder guns, and two 18-inch (450 mm) torpedo tubes.[6][7] The ship had a crew of 63 officers and men.[8]

Earnest was laid down at Laird's Birkenhead shipyard as Yard number 621 on 2 March 1896 and was launched on 7 November 1896.[3] Earnest reached 30.13 knots (55.80 km/h; 34.67 mph) during sea trials.[9] She was completed in November 1897.[3]

Service[edit]

In 1897 Earnest was in reserve at Devonport.[10] She was transferred to the Mediterranean Squadron in September 1898,[3] and was in August 1901 recommissioned at Malta as tender to the battleship HMS Caesar.[11] Earnest returned to Home waters in 1907.[3]


References[edit]

  1. ^ "Earnest Class". www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk. Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  2. ^ "HMS Earnest". navalhistory.flixco.info. Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Lyon 2001, p. 62
  4. ^ a b Lyon 2001, pp. 61–62
  5. ^ Chesneau & Kolesnik 1979, p. 94
  6. ^ Lyon 2001, pp. 98–99
  7. ^ Friedman 2009, p. 40
  8. ^ Manning 1961, p. 40
  9. ^ Brassey 1902, p. 275
  10. ^ "Naval Matters—Past and Prospective: Devonport Dockyard". The Marine Engineer and Naval Architect. 1 October 1897. p. 264. 
  11. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence". The Times (36533). London. 14 August 1901. p. 4. 
  • Brassey, T.A. (1902). The Naval Annual 1902. Portsmouth, UK: J. Griffin and Co. 
  • Chesneau, Roger; Kolesnik, Eugene M, eds. (1979). Conway's All The World's Fighting Ships 1860–1905. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-133-5. 
  • Friedman, Norman (2009). British Destroyers: From Earliest Days to the Second World War. Barnsley, UK: Seaforth Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84832-049-9. 
  • Gardiner, Robert; Gray, Randal (1985). Conway's All The World's Fighting Ships 1906–1921. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-245-5. 
  • Lyon, David (2001). The First Destroyers. London: Caxton Editions. ISBN 1-84067-3648. 
  • Manning, T.D. (1961). The British Destroyer. London: Putnam.