HMS Edgar (1668)

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For other ships with the same name, see HMS Edgar.
History
Royal Navy EnsignGreat Britain
Name: HMS Edgar
Builder: Baylie, Bristol
Launched: 1668
Fate: Burnt, 1711
General characteristics as built[1]
Class and type: 72-gun third rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 994
Length: 124 ft (38 m) (keel)
Beam: 39 ft 10 in (12.14 m)
Depth of hold: 16 ft (4.9 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament: 72 guns of various weights of shot
General characteristics after 1700 rebuild[2]
Class and type: 70-gun third rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 1199 tons
Length: 153 ft 6 in (46.79 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 39 ft 9 in (12.12 m)
Depth of hold: 15 ft 6 in (4.72 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament: 70 guns of various weights of shot
General characteristics after 1709 rebuild[3]
Class and type: 1706 Establishment 70-gun third rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 1120 tons
Length: 150 ft (46 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 41 ft (12 m)
Depth of hold: 17 ft 4 in (5.28 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament:
  • 70 guns:
  • Gundeck: 26 × 24 pdrs
  • Upper gundeck: 26 × 12 pdrs
  • Quarterdeck: 14 × 6 pdrs
  • Forecastle: 4 × 6 pdrs

HMS Edgar was a 72-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built by Baylie of Bristol and launched in 1668. By 1685 she was carrying 74 guns.[1]

In May 1689 Edgar saw action in the Nine Years' War under the command of Cloudesley Shovell, who later became Admiral of the Fleet and eventually died in the Scilly naval disaster of 1707.[4] During this war, Edgar was present at the first fight of the Battle of Bantry Bay when a French fleet was landing troops against King William III.[4]

In 1700 Edgar underwent a rebuild at Portsmouth Dockyard as a 70-gun ship.[2] She was rebuilt for a second time by Burchett of Rotherhithe as a 70-gun ship to the 1706 Establishment, relaunching on 31 March 1709.[3]

Edgar was destroyed by fire in 1711.[3] All on board perished.

32 pounder salvaged in 1841, 130 years after the sinking, now on display at the Tower of London

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p161.
  2. ^ a b Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p166.
  3. ^ a b c Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p168.
  4. ^ a b www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk - The legacy of Sir Cloudsley Shovel

References[edit]