HMS Electra (1896)

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For other ships with the same name, see HMS Electra.
History
Royal Navy Ensign
Ordered: 1895 – 1896 Naval Estimates
Builder: J & G Thompson, Clydebank
Laid down: 18 October 1895
Launched: 14 July 1896
Commissioned: July 1900
Out of service: Laid up in reserve 1919
Fate: 29 April 1920 sold to Barking Ship Breaking Company for breaking
General characteristics
Class and type: Clydebank three-funnel, 30-knot destroyer[1][2]
Displacement:
  • 345 t (340 long tons) standard
  • 485 t (477 long tons) full load
  • 214 ft (65 m) o/a
  • 20 ft (6.1 m) Beam
  • 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m) Draught
Propulsion:
Speed: 30 kn (56 km/h)
Range:
  • 80 tons coal
  • 1,465 nmi (2,713 km) at 11 kn (20 km/h; 13 mph)
Complement: 63 officers and men
Armament:
Service record
Operations: World War I 1914 - 1918

HMS Electra was a Clydebank-built, three-funnelled, 30-knot destroyer ordered by the Royal Navy under the 1895-1896 Naval Estimates. She was the fourth ship to carry this name since it was introduced in 1806 for a 16-gun brig-sloop.[3][4]

In 1913 she was grouped along with similar vessels as a C-class destroyer.

Construction[edit]

She was laid down as Yard Number 289 on 18 October 1895, at J & G Thompson shipyard in Clydebank, and launched on 14 July 1896. During her builder’s trials, she had problems attaining her contract speed. Her hull was lengthened by 4 feet (1.2 m), then she made her contract speed of 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph). She was completed and accepted by the Royal Navy in July 1900.[3][4]

Service[edit]

After commissioning she was assigned to the Chatham Division of the Harwich Flotilla. She was deployed in home waters for her entire service life. In June 1902 she took the place of the HMS Fervent in the Portsmouth instructional flotilla,[5] under the command of Lieutenant Rowland Henry Bather,[6] but he transferred to the HMS Lightning after two months.[7]

On 30 August 1912 the Admiralty directed all destroyer classes were to be designated by letters. Since her design speed was 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph) and she had three funnels, she was assigned with vessels built to the same specification as the C Class. After 30 September 1913, she was known as a C-Class destroyer and had the letter ‘C’ painted on the hull below the bridge area and on either the fore or aft funnel.[8]

In 1914 she was in active commission at the Nore based at Sheerness tendered to HMS Actaeon a Royal Navy training establishment. With the outbreak of hostilities in August 1914 she was assigned to the Nore Local Flotilla. Her duties included anti-submarine and counter-mining patrols in the Thames Estuary.

In 1919 she was paid off and laid-up in reserve awaiting disposal. She was sold on 29 April 1920 to Barking Ship Breaking Company for breaking.[9]

Pennant numbers[edit]

Pennant Number[9] From To
N55 6 Dec 1914 1 Sep 1915
D52 1 Sep 1915 1 Jan 1918
D31 1 Jan 1918 29 Apr 1920

Ship Captains[edit]

The following men were appointed to command on the dates given.[10]

  • Lieutenant Cecil D. S. Raikes, 15 January, 1901
  • Lieutenant Rowland Henry Bather, 11 June 1902[6]
  • Lieutenant-Commander Frank G. Terry, 18 April, 1912
  • Lieutenant-Commander George B. Hartford, 11 December, 1913
  • Lieutenant-Commander (retired) Ralph Tindal, 6 November, 1914
  • Commander Hubert S. Monroe, 23 May, 1915
  • Commander Charles E. Cundall, 23 July, 1918

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jane, Fred T. (1969) [1905]. Jane’s Fighting Ships 1905. New York: first published by Sampson Low Marston, London 1905, reprinted ARCO Publishing Company. p. 77. 
  2. ^ Jane, Fred T. (1990) [1919, reprinted]. Jane’s Fighting Ships of World War I. Jane’s Publishing © 1919. p. 77. ISBN 1 85170 378 0. 
  3. ^ a b Jane, Fred T. (1969) [1898, sampson Low Marston, London]. Jane’s All The Worlds Fighting Ships 1898. New York: ARCO Publishing Company. pp. 84 to 85. 
  4. ^ a b Jane, Fred T. (1990) [1919, reprinted]. Jane’s Fighting Ships of World War I. Jane’s Publishing. p. 76. ISBN 1 85170 378 0. 
  5. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence". The Times (36788). London. 7 June 1902. p. 9. 
  6. ^ a b "Naval & Military intelligence". The Times (36794). London. 14 June 1902. p. 9. 
  7. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence". The Times (36839). London. 6 August 1902. p. 8. 
  8. ^ Conway’s All the World’s Fighting Ships 1906 to 1922. Conway Maritime Press. 2006 [1985, reprinted 1986, 1997, 2002, 2006]. pp. 17–19. ISBN 0 85177 245 5. 
  9. ^ a b ""Arrowsmith" List – Part 1 Destroyer Prototypes through "River" Class". Retrieved 1 Jun 2013. 
  10. ^ The Dreadnought Project.
  • Manning, Captain T.D. The British Destroyer. Godfrey Cave Associates. ISBN 0-906223-13-X. 

External links[edit]