HMS Locust (1896)

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For other ships with the same name, see HMS Locust.
History
United Kingdom
Name: HMS Locust
Builder: Laird, Son & Co., Birkenhead
Laid down: 20 April 1896
Launched: 5 December 1896
Completed: July 1898
Fate: Scrapped, 1919
General characteristics
Class and type: Earnest-class destroyer
Displacement: 395 long tons (401 t)
Length: 218 ft (66 m) oa
Beam: 21 ft 6 in (6.6 m)
Draught: 9 ft 9 in (3.0 m)
Propulsion:
Speed: 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph)
Complement: 63
Armament:

HMS Locust was a B-class torpedo boat destroyer of the British Royal Navy. She was launched by Laird, Son & Company, Birkenhead, on 5 December 1896.[1] She served in the Mediterranean between 1902 and 1906, and was used for patrol and escort duties during the First World War

Construction[edit]

Locust was ordered on 23 December 1896 as the third of six 30-knotter destroyers programmed to be built by Lairds under the 1895–1896 shipbuilding programme for the Royal Navy.[2] These followed on from four very similar destroyers ordered from Lairds as part of the 1894–1895 programme.[3]

Locust was 218 feet (66.45 m) long overall and 213 feet (64.92 m) between perpendiculars, with a beam of 21 feet 6 inches (6.55 m) and a draught of 9 feet 9 inches (2.97 m). Displacement was 355 long tons (361 t) light and 415 long tons (422 t) full load. Like the other Laird-built 30-knotters, Locust was propelled by two triple expansion steam engines, fed by four Normand boilers, rated at 6,300 ihp (4,700 kW), and was fitted with four funnels.[3][4]

Armament was the standard for the 30-knotters, i.e. a QF 12 pounder 12 cwt (3 in (76 mm) calibre) gun on a platform on the ship's conning tower (in practice the platform was also used as the ship's bridge), with a secondary armament of five 6-pounder guns, and two 18-inch (450 mm) torpedo tubes.[5][6] The ship had a crew of 63 officers and men.[7]

Locust was laid down at Laird's Birkenhead shipyard as Yard number 623 on 20 April 1894 and was launched on 5 December 1896.[2] During sea trials on 21 January 1898, Locust reached an average speed of 30.26 knots (56.04 km/h; 34.82 mph) over six runs of a measured mile and 30.16 knots (55.86 km/h; 34.71 mph) on a three-hour run.[8] She was completed in July 1898.[2]

Service history[edit]

On 2 February 1900 she was commissioned as tender to HMS Vivid, shore establishment at Devonport, for service in the Devonport Instructional flotilla,[9] and Lieutenant Stephen Herbert Radcliffe was appointed in command.[10] She took part in the 1901 Naval Manoeuvres.[11] On 5 December 1901 she was recommissioned as tender to the battleship Victorious on the Mediterranean station.[12] She left Devonport for Malta in January the following year.[13]

The future Admiral of the Fleet, Andrew Cunningham, was appointed her second-in-command while a sub-lieutenant, in September 1903.[14] Locust returned to the United Kingdom in 1906.[2]

On 30 August 1912 the Admiralty directed all destroyers were to be grouped into classes designated by letters based on contract speed and appearance. As a four-funneled 30-knotter destroyer, Locust was assigned to the B Class.[15][16]

Locust was a member of the Fifth Destroyer Flotilla, based at Devonport, in 1912, and after a reorganisation of the Royal Navy's destroyer flotillas in 1912, with older destroyers being transferred to patrol flotillas, joined the Seventh Destroyer Flotilla, also based at Devonport.[17][18]

Locust remained part of the Seventh Patrol Flotilla in August 1914,[19][20] which transferred to the Humber on the East coast of England following the outbreak of the First World War.[21][22] In November 1914, Locust was transferred to Scapa Flow, where she carried out local patrol and escort duties.[17][23][24] Locust remained part of the Scapa Flow local patrol forces until January 1918,[25] but transferred to the Firth of Forth as part of the Methil Convoy Flotilla by February that year.[26] By May 1918, Locust had moved again, returning to the Seventh Flotilla based on the Humber,[27] remaining there until the end of the war.[28]

Locust was sold for scrap to J. Jackson on 10 June 1919.[29]

Pennant numbers[edit]

Pennant number[29] Date
D29 1914
D84 September 1915
D54 January 1918
H02 April 1918

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Times (London), Monday, 7 December 1896, p.12
  2. ^ a b c d Lyon 2001, p. 62
  3. ^ a b Lyon 2001, pp. 61–62
  4. ^ Chesneau & Kolesnik 1979, p. 94
  5. ^ Lyon 2001, pp. 98–99
  6. ^ Friedman 2009, p. 40
  7. ^ Manning 1961, p. 40
  8. ^ "The Birkenhead Destroyers" (PDF). The Engineer. Vol. 85. 28 January 1898. p. 88. 
  9. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence" The Times (London). Monday, 5 February 1900. (36057), p. 11.
  10. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence" The Times (London). Friday, 2 February 1900. (36055), p. 10.
  11. ^ Brassey 1902, p. 90
  12. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence" The Times (London). Friday, 6 December 1901. (36631), p. 6.
  13. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence" The Times (London). Monday, 20 January 1902. (36669), p. 6.
  14. ^ "Cunningham information sheet". Royal Naval Museum. 2004. Archived from the original on 13 July 2007. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  15. ^ Gardiner & Gray 1985, p. 18
  16. ^ Manning 1961, pp. 17–18
  17. ^ a b "NMM, vessel ID 370451" (PDF). Warship Histories, vol ii. National Maritime Museum. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  18. ^ Manning 1961, p. 25
  19. ^ "Fleets and Squadrons in Commission at Home and Abroad: Patrol Flotillas". The Navy List: 269c. August 1914. 
  20. ^ "HMS Locust". Late 18th, 19th and early 20th Century Naval and Naval Social History. pbenyon.plus.com. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  21. ^ Manning 1961, p. 26
  22. ^ Corbett 1920, pp. 15–16
  23. ^ "Supplement to the Monthly Naval List Showing Organisation of the Fleet, Flag Officer's Commands, &c.". The Navy List: 8. January 1915. 
  24. ^ Manning 1961, p. 27
  25. ^ "Ships of the Royal Navy - Location/Action Date, 1914–1918: Part 2 - Admiralty "Pink Lists", 2 January 1918". Naval-history.net. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  26. ^ "Supplement to the Monthly Naval List Showing Organisation of the Fleet, Flag Officer's Commands, &c.". The Navy List: 16. February 1918. 
  27. ^ "Supplement to the Monthly Naval List Showing Organisation of the Fleet, Flag Officer's Commands, &c.". The Navy List: 15. May 1918. 
  28. ^ "Ships of the Royal Navy - Location/Action Date, 1914–1918: Part 2 - Admiralty "Pink Lists", 11 November 1918". Naval-history.net. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  29. ^ a b Dittmar & Colledge 1972, p. 57