HMS Pactolus (1896)

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For other ships with the same name, see HMS Pactolus.
History
United Kingdom
Name: HMS Pactolus
Builder: Armstrong, Elswick
Laid down: May 1896
Launched: 21 December 1896
Completed: 1899
Fate: sold for scrap 25 October 1921
General characteristics
Class and type: Pelorus-class protected cruiser
Displacement: 2135 tons
Length: 313 ft 6 in (95.6 m) (overall)
Beam: 36 ft 6 in (11.1 m)
Draught: 16 ft 0 in (4.9 m)
Propulsion: 2-shaft reciprocating triple-expansion engines, Blechynden boilers, 5000hp
Speed:
  • 20.7 knots (38.3 km/h) (trials)
  • 18.5 knots (34.3 km/h) knots (service)
Complement: 224
Armament:
  • 8 × 1 4-inch (102mm)/40 QF 25-pounder
  • 8 × 1 1.585in (57mm)/40 QF 3-pounder
  • 2 × 1 18-inch (457mm) torpedo tubes
Armour:
  • 0.25in (gun shields)
  • 2-1.5in (decks)

HMS Pactolus was a Pelorus-class protected cruiser of the Royal Navy. There were eleven ""Third class"" protected cruisers in the class, which was designed by Sir William White. While well armed for their size, they were primarily workhorses for the overseas fleet on "police" duties and did not serve with the main battlefleet.

They displaced 2,135 tons, had a crew complement of 224 men and were armed with eight QF 4 inch (102 mm) (25 pounder) guns, eight 3 pounder guns, three machine guns, and two 18 inch (457 mm) torpedo tubes. With reciprocating triple expansion engines and a variety of boilers, the top speed was 20 knots (37 km/h).

HMS Pactolus was laid down at Armstrong, Elswick in May 1896, launched 21 December 1896, but was not completed until 1899.

She served with the Channel Fleet, and was under the command of Captain Francis John Foley in early 1900.[1] Commander Gerald Marescaux was appointed in command on 20 March 1902.[2]

She was sold for scrap on 25 October 1921. HMS Pactolus and HMS Pomone had Blechynden boilers which were particularly unreliable, and they were removed from active service several years before others in the class.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence". The Times (36046). London. 23 January 1900. p. 12. 
  2. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence". The Times (36705). London. 3 March 1902. p. 10. 

References[edit]