HMS Proteus (N29)

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For other ships with the same name, see HMS Proteus.
HMS Phoenix 1939 AWM 302469.jpg
History
United Kingdom
Name: HMS Proteus
Ordered: 7 February 1928
Builder: Vickers Shipbuilding and Engineering, Barrow-in-Furness
Laid down: 18 July 1928
Launched: 23 August 1929
Completed: 22 August 1929
Commissioned: 5 May 1930
Decommissioned: 30 June 1944
Fate: Scrapped at Troon, Feb-Mar 1946
Notes: Used for patrol mainly within the Mediterranean Sea.
General characteristics
Class and type: Parthian-class submarine
Displacement:
  • 1,788 long tons (1,817 t) surfaced
  • 2,040 long tons (2,070 t) submerged
Length: 289 ft (88 m)
Beam: 30 ft (9.1 m)
Draught: 15 ft 11 in (4.85 m)
Propulsion:
  • Diesel-electric
  • 2 Admiralty diesel engines, 4,400 hp (3,300 kW)
  • 2 Electric motors, 1,530 hp (1,140 kW)
  • 2 shafts
Speed:
  • 17.5 knots (20.1 mph; 32.4 km/h) surfaced
  • 9 kn (10 mph; 17 km/h) submerged
Range: 8,500 nmi (15,700 km) at 10 kn (12 mph; 19 km/h)
Complement: 53
Armament:
  • 8 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes (6 bow, 2 stern)
  • 1 × 4 in (102 mm) deck gun
  • 2 × machine guns
Notes: Pennant number: N29

HMS Proteus was a Parthian-class submarine designed and built by Vickers Shipbuilding and Engineering in Barrow-in-Furness for the Royal Navy, and was launched on 22 August 1929. Like other submarines in her class she served in China before the war.

Proteus engaged and sank a number of German and Italian merchant ships, troopships, tankers and torpedo boats during her service in the Mediterranean in the Second World War. HMS Proteus was the longest surviving Parthian-class submarine and the only Parthian class submarine to survive the war.

Proteus had a total of nine commanders throughout the war.

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