HMS Rippon (1712)

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For other ships with the same name, see HMS Rippon.
History
Royal Navy EnsignGreat Britain
Name: HMS Rippon
Builder: Allin, Deptford Dockyard
Launched: 23 August 1712
Fate: Broken up, 1751
General characteristics as built[1]
Class and type: 1706 Establishment 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 924 tons BM
Length: 144 ft (43.9 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 38 ft (11.6 m)
Depth of hold: 15 ft 8 in (4.8 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament:
  • 60 guns:
  • Gundeck: 24 × 24 pdrs
  • Upper gundeck: 26 × 9 pdrs
  • Quarterdeck: 8 × 6 pdrs
  • Forecastle: 2 × 6 pdrs
General characteristics after 1735 rebuild[2]
Class and type: 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 1,021 bm
Length: 145 ft (44.2 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 40 ft (12.2 m)
Depth of hold: 16 ft 5 in (5.0 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament: 60 guns of various weights of shot

HMS Rippon was a 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built by Sir Joseph Allin at Deptford Dockyard and launched on 23 August 1712.[1]

Orders were issued on 23 June 1730 directing that Rippon be taken to pieces and rebuilt at Woolwich. Unlike almost every other ship of the line rebuild of the time, Rippon was not reconstructed to the dimensions laid out in the naval establishments, though the differences were not pronounced: Rippon had one foot added to the gundeck and keel lengths, and the breadth, and Centurion, a new-built ship, had previously been built with one foot great breadth over the standard dimensions of the 1719 Establishment, as an experiment into increasing the sizes of the Royal Navy's ships in response to the growth of foreign vessels.[3] She was relaunched on 29 March 1735.[2]

Rippon served until 1751, when she was broken up.[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p168.
  2. ^ a b c Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p170.
  3. ^ Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p81.

References[edit]

  • Lavery, Brian (2003) The Ship of the Line - Volume 1: The development of the battlefleet 1650-1850. Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-252-8.