HMS Rupert (1666)

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For other ships with the same name, see HMS Rupert.
History
Royal Navy EnsignGreat Britain
Name: HMS Rupert
Builder: Anthony Deane, Harwich Dockyard
Launched: 26 January 1666
Fate: Broken up, 1769
General characteristics as built[1]
Class and type: 64-gun third rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 791 tons (803.7 tonnes)
Length: 119 ft (36 m) (keel)
Beam: 36 ft 3 in (11.05 m)
Depth of hold: 17 ft 1 in (5.21 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Complement: 320 (later 400)
Armament: 64 guns as built, comprising 22 demi-cannon, 28 culverins and 14 demi-culverins
General characteristics after 1703 rebuild[2]
Class and type: 66-gun third rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 930 tons (944.9 tonnes)
Length: 143 ft 4 in (43.69 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 38 ft 4 in (11.68 m)
Depth of hold: 15 ft 2 in (4.62 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament: 66 guns of various weights of shot
General characteristics after 1740 rebuild[3]
Class and type: 1733 proposals 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 1070 tons (1087.2 tonnes)
Length: 144 ft (44 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 41 ft 5 in (12.62 m)
Depth of hold: 16 ft 11 in (5.16 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament:
  • 60 guns:
  • Gundeck: 24 × 24 pdrs
  • Upper gundeck: 26 × 9 pdrs
  • Quarterdeck: 8 × 6 pdrs
  • Forecastle: 2 × 6 pdrs

HMS Rupert was a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, ordered on 26 October 1664 as part of the ship construction programme of that year. She was launched on 26 January 1666 at Harwich Dockyard.[1]

In his diary entry of 19 May 1666, Samuel Pepys of the Navy Board describes a conversation concerning the construction of the Rupert that he had with her designer, Anthony Deane:

...the King, Duke, and every body saying it is the best ship that was ever built. And then he fell to explain to me his manner of casting the draught of water which a ship will draw before-hand: which is a secret the King and all admire in him; and he is the first that hath come to any certainty before-hand, of foretelling the draught of water of a ship before she be launched. Wikisource-logo.svg Diary of Samuel Pepys, May 1666.

By 1677 the Rupert carried a complement of 400 men and 66 guns (comprising twenty-six 24-pounders, twenty-four 12-pounders, fourteen sakers [5-pounders] and two 3-pounders),[citation needed] but by 1685 she was carrying only 64 guns again (comprising twenty-four 24-pounders, two culverins, twenty-six 12-pounders and twelve demi-culverins).[citation needed]

In 1697 she was taken into Plymouth Dockyard to be rebuilt by Benjamin Rosewell, and she was relaunched in November 1703 as a 66-gun third rate once again.[2] In 1716 she was reduced to a fourth rate, and on 16 August 1736 she was ordered to be taken to pieces and rebuilt at Sheerness Dockyard, although by this date the practice of rebuilding had become a legal fiction, and 'rebuilt' ships were in practice new vessels incorporating a small portion of their predecessor's timber into the construction. She was relaunched on 27 October 1740 as 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line built to the 1733 proposals of the 1719 Establishment.[3]

Rupert was broken up in 1769.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p160.
  2. ^ a b Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p167.
  3. ^ a b Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p171.

References[edit]

  • Lavery, Brian (2003) The Ship of the Line - Volume 1: The development of the battlefleet 1650-1850. Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-252-8.