HMS Winchelsea (D46)

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For other ships with the same name, see HMS Winchelsea.
HMS Winchelsea WWII IWM FL 12487.jpg
Winchelsea during World War II
History
RN EnsignUnited Kingdom
Name: HMS Winchelsea (D46)
Ordered: 9 December 1916
Builder: J. Samuel White
Laid down: 25 May 1917
Launched: 15 December 1917
Decommissioned: March 1945
Fate: Scrapped August 1945
General characteristics
Class and type: W class destroyer

HMS Winchelsea (D46) was an Admiralty W class destroyer of the Royal Navy, ordered 9 December 1916 from J. Samuel White at Cowes during the 1916-17 Build Programme.

Winchelsea was then launched 15 December 1917 and was the 7th Royal Navy ship to carry this name, which was introduced in 1694 and named after the 6th Earl of Winchelsea (1647–1730)[1]

In March 1945 she was de-commissioned and sold for scrap.[2]

Events in history[edit]

27 July 1940 - 84 survivors were picked up from the British merchant ships Sambre and Thiara. The freighters had been torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-34 (1936), south-south-west of Rockall.

17 September 1940 - 25 survivors were picked up from the British merchant Crown Arun. The boat had been torpedoed and was then sunk with gunfire by the German submarine U-99, north of Rockall.

2 November 1942 - 24 survivors were picked up from the British merchant Hartington. The boat had been torpedoed and sunk by thU-521, approximately 450 nautical miles (830 km) east of Belle Isle.[3]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "H . M . S . W I N C H E L S E A ( D 4 6 )". Retrieved 2007-12-13. 
  2. ^ "Wakeful Class". Retrieved 2007-12-13. 
  3. ^ "HMS Winchelsea (D 46)". Retrieved 2007-12-13. 

Bibliography[edit]

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  • Chesneau, Roger, ed. (1980). Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1922–1946. Greenwich, UK: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-146-7. 
  • Colledge, J. J.; Warlow, Ben (2006) [1969]. Ships of the Royal Navy: The Complete Record of all Fighting Ships of the Royal Navy (Rev. ed.). London: Chatham Publishing. ISBN 978-1-86176-281-8. OCLC 67375475. 
  • Cocker, Maurice; Allan, Ian. Destroyers of the Royal Navy, 1893-1981. ISBN 0-7110-1075-7. 
  • Friedman, Norman (2009). British Destroyers From Earliest Days to the Second World War. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 978-1-59114-081-8. 
  • Gardiner, Robert & Gray, Randal, eds. (1984). Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships: 1906–1921. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-85177-245-5. 
  • Lenton, H. T. (1998). British & Empire Warships of the Second World War. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-048-7. 
  • March, Edgar J. (1966). British Destroyers: A History of Development, 1892-1953; Drawn by Admiralty Permission From Official Records & Returns, Ships' Covers & Building Plans. London: Seeley Service. OCLC 164893555. 
  • Preston, Antony (1971). 'V & W' Class Destroyers 1917-1945. London: Macdonald. OCLC 464542895. 
  • Raven, Alan & Roberts, John (1979). 'V' and 'W' Class Destroyers. Man o'War. 2. London: Arms & Armour. ISBN 0-85368-233-X. 
  • Rohwer, Jürgen (2005). Chronology of the War at Sea 1939-1945: The Naval History of World War Two (Third Revised ed.). Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-119-2. 
  • Whinney, Bob (2000). The U-boat Peril: A Fight for Survival. Cassell. ISBN 0-304-35132-6. 
  • Whitley, M. J. (1988). Destroyers of World War 2. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-326-1. 
  • Winser, John de D. (1999). B.E.F. Ships Before, At and After Dunkirk. Gravesend, Kent: World Ship Society. ISBN 0-905617-91-6.