HNLMS Van Galen (1928)

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Hr. Ms. Van Galen (1929).jpg
HNLMS Van Galen
History
Netherlands
Name: Van Galen
Namesake: Johan van Galen
Builder: Fijenoord
Laid down: 28 May 1927
Launched: 28 June 1928
Commissioned: 22 October 1929
Fate: Sunk, 10 May 1940
General characteristics
Class and type: Admiralen-class destroyer
Displacement:
  • 1,316 long tons (1,337 t) standard
  • 1,640 long tons (1,666 t) full load
Length: 98 m (321 ft 6 in)
Beam: 9.53 m (31 ft 3 in)
Draft: 2.97 m (9 ft 9 in)
Installed power:
Propulsion:
Speed: 36 knots (67 km/h; 41 mph)
Range: 3,200 nmi (5,900 km; 3,700 mi) at 15 kn (28 km/h; 17 mph)
Complement: 149
Armament:
  • 4 × 120 mm (4.7 in) guns (4×1)
  • 1 × 75 mm (3 in) AA gun
  • 4 × 40 mm (1.6 in) AA guns
  • 4 × 12.7 mm (0.50 in) guns
  • 6 × 533 mm (21 in) torpedo tubes (2×3)
Aircraft carried: 1 × Fokker C.VII-W floatplane
Aviation facilities: crane

HNLMS Van Galen (Dutch: Hr.Ms. Van Galen) was a Admiralen-class destroyer of the Royal Netherlands Navy, named after the 17th century Dutch Commodore Johan van Galen. She served during World War II. The opening chapter of E.H.Larive's autobiography 'The Man Who Came In From Colditz' (p. Hale, 1975) describes in detail the craft's demise.

Service history[edit]

The ship was laid down on 28 May 1927, at the shipyard Fijenoord, in Rotterdam, and launched on 28 June 1928. The ship was commissioned on 22 October 1929.[1]

On 22 February 1932, Van Galen left Surabaya, for a trip to Shanghai, to look after Dutch interests in the region. She returned in April that year.[2]

On 16 November 1935, Van Galen, her sister Witte de With, and the cruiser Sumatra, made a visit to Saigon.[3]

On 23 August 1936, Sumatra, her sister Java, and the destroyers Van Galen, Witte de With and Piet Hein, were present at the fleet days held at Surabaya.[4]

On 16 August 1937, the ship was again send to Shanghai, because of rising political tension in China. With the ship, 150 marines were sent to protect European citizens and interests.[5]

On 8 May 1940, she returned to the Netherlands, on 10 May, war with Germany broke out. The Germans had captured the airfield Waalhaven, in Rotterdam, and Van Galen was ordered to bombard the airfield. A German aircraft attacked her while underway and she sank near Merwehaven. The Germans decided to raise the ship on 23 October 1941. The wreck was scrapped in Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "netherlandsnavy.nl". Retrieved 2013-10-12.
  2. ^ "scheepvaartmuseum.nl :: Maritieme kalender 1932". Archived from the original on 2013-10-14. Retrieved 2013-10-12.
  3. ^ "scheepvaartmuseum.nl :: Maritieme kalender 1935". Retrieved 2013-10-12.
  4. ^ "scheepvaartmuseum.nl :: Maritieme kalender 1936". Retrieved 2013-10-12.
  5. ^ "scheepvaartmuseum.nl :: Maritieme kalender 1937". Retrieved 2013-10-12.