HP Roman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from HP roman8)
Jump to: navigation, search
Not to be confused with Mac OS Roman.

In computing HP Roman is a family of character sets consisting of HP Roman Extension, HP Roman-8, HP Roman-9 and several variants. Originally introduced by Hewlett-Packard around 1978, revisions and adaptations were published several times up to 1999. The 1985 revisions were later standardized as IBM codepages 1050 and 1051. Supporting many European languages, the character sets were used by various HP workstations, terminals, calculators as well as many printers, also from third-parties.

Overview[edit]

HP Roman is a family of single byte character encodings supporting several Latin script based languages of Europe. It was originally introduced by Hewlett-Packard around 1978 as 7- and 8-bit HP Roman Extension for some of their computer terminals and printers. Early versions of the 8-bit variant were also used by some HP workstations in 1978/1979. Several revisions led to more characters being added before the 8-bit variant of the character set became officially known as HP Roman-8 in 1983.[1] Soon later, this became the default character set of the HP-UX[2] operating system and the page description language PCL for inkjet[3] and laser printers in 1984. The character set was again expanded in 1985.[3][4][5] A modified adaptation was used in several early RPL calculators and corresponding thermal printers since 1986.[6][7] The latest off-spring of the family is HP Roman-9, which was introduced around 1999 to include the euro sign.

Codepage layout[edit]

Roman Extension[edit]

The character set was orignally introduced by Hewlett-Packard as extended ASCII 7-bit codepage named HP Roman Extension[8][9] (also known as RE,[9] code page 1050, CP1050 or ibm-1050[10]), which existed at least since 1978.[11][12][13][14][15] On some systems it was also accessible as 8-bit codepage. Before the name "Roman-8" was established for the 8-bit variant in 1983, this was sometimes called "8-bit mode", "8-bit Roman Extension" or "HP Roman-8 Extension". Over the years both variants were revised to include more characters. The final 1985 revision of the character set was also standardized as codepage 1050 by IBM in 1989.[10]

The table shows the 1982 version (a current variant is shown in the Roman-8 chapter).

Legend:

HP Roman Extension (1982)[8]
_0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F
 
0_
 
NUL
0000
0
SOH
0001
1
STX
0002
2
ETX
0003
3
EOT
0004
4
ENQ
0005
5
ACK
0006
6
BEL
0007
7
BS
0008
8
HT
0009
9
LF
000A
10
VT
000B
11
FF
000C
12
CR
000D
13
SO
000E
14
SI
000F
15
 
1_
 
DLE
0010
16
DC1
0011
17
DC2
0012
18
DC3
0013
19
DC4
0014
20
NAK
0015
21
SYN
0016
22
ETB
0017
23
CAN
0018
24
EM
0019
25
SUB
001A
26
ESC
001B
27
FS
001C
28
GS
001D
29
RS
001E
30
US
001F
31
 
2_
 
SP
0020
32
!
0021
33
"
0022
34
#
0023
35
$
0024
36
%
0025
37
&
0026
38
'
0027
39
(
0028
40
)
0029
41
*
002A
42
+
002B
43
,
002C
44
-
002D
45
.
002E
46
/
002F
47
 
3_
 
0
0030
48
1
0031
49
2
0032
50
3
0033
51
4
0034
52
5
0035
53
6
0036
54
7
0037
55
8
0038
56
9
0039
57
:
003A
58
;
003B
59
<
003C
60
=
003D
61
>
003E
62
?
003F
63
 
4_
 
@
0040
64
A
0041
65
B
0042
66
C
0043
67
D
0044
68
E
0045
69
F
0046
70
G
0047
71
H
0048
72
I
0049
73
J
004A
74
K
004B
75
L
004C
76
M
004D
77
N
004E
78
O
004F
79
 
5_
 
P
0050
80
Q
0051
81
R
0052
82
S
0053
83
T
0054
84
U
0055
85
V
0056
86
W
0057
87
X
0058
88
Y
0059
89
Z
005A
90
[
005B
91
\
005C
92
]
005D
93
^
005E
94
_
005F
95
 
6_
 
`
0060
96
a
0061
97
b
0062
98
c
0063
99
d
0064
100
e
0065
101
f
0066
102
g
0067
103
h
0068
104
i
0069
105
j
006A
106
k
006B
107
l
006C
108
m
006D
109
n
006E
110
o
006F
111
 
7_
 
p
0070
112
q
0071
113
r
0072
114
s
0073
115
t
0074
116
u
0075
117
v
0076
118
w
0077
119
x
0078
120
y
0079
121
z
007A
122
{
007B
123
|
007C
124
}
007D
125
~
007E
126
DEL ()
007F (2592)
127
 
8_
 
 
0080
128
 
0081
129
BPH
0082
130
NBH
0083
131
 
0084
132
NEL
0085
133
SSA
0086
134
ESA
0087
135
HTS
0088
136
HTJ
0089
137
VTS
008A
138
PLD
008B
139
PLU
008C
140
RI
008D
141
SS2
008E
142
SS3
008F
143
 
9_
 
DCS
0090
144
PU1
0091
145
PU2
0092
146
STS
0093
147
CCH
0094
148
MW
0095
149
SPA
0096
150
EPA
0097
151
SOS
0098
152
 
0099
153
SCI
009A
154
CSI
009B
155
ST
009C
156
OSC
009D
157
PM
009E
158
APC
009F
159
 
A_
 
NBSP
00A0
160
 

161
 

162
 

163
 

164
 

165
 

166
 

167
´
00B4
168
ˋ (`)
02CB (0060)
169
ˆ
02C6
170
¨
00A8
171
˜
02DC
172
 

173
 

174
(£)
20A4 (00A3)
175
 
B_
 
¯ ()
00AF (203E)
176
 

177
 

178
 

179
 

180
ç
00E7
181
Ñ
00D1
182
ñ
00F1
183
¡
00A1
184
¿
00BF
185
¤
00A4
186
£
00A3
187
 

188
§
00A7
189
 

190
 

191
 
C_
 
â
00E2
192
ê
00EA
193
ô
00F4
194
û
00FB
195
á
00E1
196
é
00E9
197
ó
00F3
198
ú
00FA
199
à
00E0
200
è
00E8
201
ò
00F2
202
ù
00F9
203
ä
00E4
204
ë
00EB
205
ö
00F6
206
ü
00FC
207
 
D_
 
Å
00C5
208
î
00EE
209
Ø
00D8
210
Æ
00C6
211
å
00E5
212
í
00ED
213
ø
00F8
214
æ
00E6
215
Ä
00C4
216
ì
00EC
217
Ö
00D6
218
Ü
00DC
219
É
00C9
220
ï
00EF
221
ß (β)
00DF (03B2)
222
 

223
 
E_
 
 

224
 

225
 

226
 

227
 

228
 

229
 

230
 

231
 

232
 

233
 

234
 

235
 

236
 

237
 

238
 

239
 
F_
 
 

240
 

241
 

242
 

243
 

244
 

245
 

246
 

247
 

248
 

249
 

250
 

251
 

252
 

253
 

254
 

255
HP Roman Extension (1982)
_0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F

Roman-8[edit]

HP Roman-8[2][16][5][17][18][19][20] (also known as HP Roman 8, HP Roman, hp-roman8, roman8, R8, code page 1051, CP1051 or ibm-1051[21][22] is an 8-bit single byte character encoding that is mainly used on HP-UX[2] and many Hewlett-Packard[6][7] and PCL compatible printers. The name Roman-8 appeared in 1983,[1] but a pre-cursor of the character set was already used by the HP 250 and HP 300 workstations since 1978/1979 as 8-bit Roman Extension.[12][13][14][15]

The original 1983/1984 version of Roman-8 still had some codepoints undefined.[3] In a 1985 revision codepoints 177 (Ý), 178 (ý), 242 (·), 243 (µ), 244 () and 245 (¾) were added and the appearance of codepoint 228 was changed from a stroked d (đ) to an eth (ð).[4][5] This final revision of the character set was also standardized as codepage 1051 by IBM in 1989.[21][22]

In contrast to the newer HP Roman-9, HP Roman-8 does not officially provide a codepoint for the euro sign. However, one source recommends to map it to codepoint 186 (as in Roman-9),[5] whereas another recommends codepoint 128 (0x80),[18] which lines up with where the character can end up in the modified HP Roman-8 character set as well.

The following table shows the latest 1985 definition of the HP Roman-8 character set (with some remarks regarding former definitions and alternative interpretations). Each character is shown with a potential Unicode equivalent and its decimal code, however, sources differ in the recommended translations for some of the codes even among definitions from Hewlett-Packard[2] and IBM.[21][22]

Legend:

HP Roman-8
_0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F
 
0_
 
NUL
0000
0
SOH
0001
1
STX
0002
2
ETX
0003
3
EOT
0004
4
ENQ
0005
5
ACK
0006
6
BEL
0007
7
BS
0008
8
HT
0009
9
LF
000A
10
VT
000B
11
FF
000C
12
CR
000D
13
SO
000E
14
SI
000F
15
 
1_
 
DLE
0010
16
DC1
0011
17
DC2
0012
18
DC3
0013
19
DC4
0014
20
NAK
0015
21
SYN
0016
22
ETB
0017
23
CAN
0018
24
EM
0019
25
SUB
001A
26
ESC
001B
27
FS
001C
28
GS
001D
29
RS
001E
30
US
001F
31
 
2_
 
SP
0020
32
!
0021
33
"
0022
34
#
0023
35
$
0024
36
%
0025
37
&
0026
38
'
0027
39
(
0028
40
)
0029
41
*
002A
42
+
002B
43
,
002C
44
-
002D
45
.
002E
46
/
002F
47
 
3_
 
0
0030
48
1
0031
49
2
0032
50
3
0033
51
4
0034
52
5
0035
53
6
0036
54
7
0037
55
8
0038
56
9
0039
57
:
003A
58
;
003B
59
<
003C
60
=
003D
61
>
003E
62
?
003F
63
 
4_
 
@
0040
64
A
0041
65
B
0042
66
C
0043
67
D
0044
68
E
0045
69
F
0046
70
G
0047
71
H
0048
72
I
0049
73
J
004A
74
K
004B
75
L
004C
76
M
004D
77
N
004E
78
O
004F
79
 
5_
 
P
0050
80
Q
0051
81
R
0052
82
S
0053
83
T
0054
84
U
0055
85
V
0056
86
W
0057
87
X
0058
88
Y
0059
89
Z
005A
90
[
005B
91
\
005C
92
]
005D
93
^
005E
94
_
005F
95
 
6_
 
`
0060
96
a
0061
97
b
0062
98
c
0063
99
d
0064
100
e
0065
101
f
0066
102
g
0067
103
h
0068
104
i
0069
105
j
006A
106
k
006B
107
l
006C
108
m
006D
109
n
006E
110
o
006F
111
 
7_
 
p
0070
112
q
0071
113
r
0072
114
s
0073
115
t
0074
116
u
0075
117
v
0076
118
w
0077
119
x
0078
120
y
0079
121
z
007A
122
{
007B
123
|
007C
124
}
007D
125
~
007E
126
DEL
007F
127
 
8_
 
 
0080
128
 
0081
129
BPH
0082
130
NBH
0083
131
 
0084
132
NEL
0085
133
SSA
0086
134
ESA
0087
135
HTS
0088
136
HTJ
0089
137
VTS
008A
138
PLD
008B
139
PLU
008C
140
RI
008D
141
SS2
008E
142
SS3
008F
143
 
9_
 
DCS
0090
144
PU1
0091
145
PU2
0092
146
STS
0093
147
CCH
0094
148
MW
0095
149
SPA
0096
150
EPA
0097
151
SOS
0098
152
 
0099
153
SCI
009A
154
CSI
009B
155
ST
009C
156
OSC
009D
157
PM
009E
158
APC
009F
159
 
A_
 
NBSP
00A0
160
À
00C0
161
Â
00C2
162
È
00C8
163
Ê
00CA
164
Ë
00CB
165
Î
00CE
166
Ï
00CF
167
´
00B4
168
ˋ (`)
02CB (0060)
169
ˆ
02C6
170
¨
00A8
171
˜
02DC
172
Ù
00D9
173
Û
00DB
174
(£)
20A4 (00A3)
175
 
B_
 
¯ ()
00AF (203E)
176
Ý
00DD
177
ý
00FD
178
° (˚)
00B0 (02DA)
179
Ç
00C7
180
ç
00E7
181
Ñ
00D1
182
ñ
00F1
183
¡
00A1
184
¿
00BF
185
¤
00A4
186
£
00A3
187
¥
00A5
188
§
00A7
189
ƒ
0192
190
¢
00A2
191
 
C_
 
â
00E2
192
ê
00EA
193
ô
00F4
194
û
00FB
195
á
00E1
196
é
00E9
197
ó
00F3
198
ú
00FA
199
à
00E0
200
è
00E8
201
ò
00F2
202
ù
00F9
203
ä
00E4
204
ë
00EB
205
ö
00F6
206
ü
00FC
207
 
D_
 
Å
00C5
208
î
00EE
209
Ø
00D8
210
Æ
00C6
211
å
00E5
212
í
00ED
213
ø
00F8
214
æ
00E6
215
Ä
00C4
216
ì
00EC
217
Ö
00D6
218
Ü
00DC
219
É
00C9
220
ï
00EF
221
ß (β)
00DF (03B2)
222
Ô
00D4
223
 
E_
 
Á
00C1
224
Ã
00C3
225
ã
00E3
226
Ð
00D0
227
ð (đ)
00F0 (0111)
228
Í
00CD
229
Ì
00CC
230
Ó
00D3
231
Ò
00D2
232
Õ
00D5
233
õ
00F5
234
Š
0160
235
š
0161
236
Ú
00DA
237
Ÿ
0178
238
ÿ
00FF
239
 
F_
 
Þ
00DE
240
þ
00FE
241
·
00B7
242
µ (μ)
00B5 (03BC)
243

00B6
244
¾
00BE
245
SHY (-)
00AD (002D)
246
¼
00BC
247
½
00BD
248
ª
00AA
249
º
00BA
250
«
00AB
251

25A0
252
»
00BB
253
±
00B1
254


255
HP Roman-8
_0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F

Modified Roman-8[edit]

In 1986, Hewlett-Packard introduced the HP-18C calculator and HP 82240A thermo printer, which internally used an extended variant of the 8-bit HP Roman-8 character set, but with the codepoints 127 (0x7F) and 160 (0xA0) as well as the control codes in the range 128 to 159 (0x80 to 0x9F) being replaced by additional displayable characters.[6][7][23] On the HP-28 series, characters above 147 (0x93) could not be displayed on the calculator, only be printed.[23][6][24]

While there is no official codepoint definition for the euro sign in this modified character set, data from the HP 49/50 series of calculators (which use a different character set[25] based on ECMA-94 / ISO 8859-1) translated to be used on HP 82240A printers via OLDPRT/PRTPAR[26][27][28] may result in the euro sign to end up at codepoint 128 (0x80) after translation, because this is the codepoint the former non-breaking space (in the HP 48 series) will be transformed to. Mapping the euro sign to code point 186 (0xBA) as in HP Roman-9 would be another choice.

Legend:

Modified HP Roman-8 (HP 82240A/B & HP-28C/S)
_0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F
 
0_
 
NUL
0000
0
SOH
0001
1
STX
0002
2
ETX
0003
3
EOT
0004
4
ENQ
0005
5
ACK
0006
6
BEL
0007
7
BS
0008
8
HT
0009
9
LF
000A
10
VT
000B
11
FF
000C
12
CR
000D
13
SO
000E
14
SI
000F
15
 
1_
 
DLE
0010
16
DC1
0011
17
DC2
0012
18
DC3
0013
19
DC4
0014
20
NAK
0015
21
SYN
0016
22
ETB
0017
23
CAN
0018
24
EM
0019
25
SUB
001A
26
ESC
001B
27
FS
001C
28
GS
001D
29
RS
001E
30
US
001F
31
 
2_–6_
 
...
 
7_
 
p
0070
112
q
0071
113
r
0072
114
s
0073
115
t
0074
116
u
0075
117
v
0076
118
w
0077
119
x
0078
120
y
0079
121
z
007A
122
{
007B
123
|
007C
124
}
007D
125
~
007E
126

2592
127
 
8_
 
NBSP ()[25])
00A0 (20AC[25])
128
÷
00F7
129
×
00D7
130

221A
131

222B
132
Σ
03A3
133

25B6
134
π
03C0
135

2202
136

2264
137

2265
138

2260
139
α
03B1
140

2192
141

2190
142
µ (μ)
00B5 (03BC)
143
 
9_
 

240A
144
°
00B0
145
«
00AB
146
»
00BB
147

251C?
148

2081
149

2082
150
²
00B2
151
³
00B3
152

1D62
153

2C7C
154

2025
155

2071
156
ʲ
02B2?
157

1D4F?
158

207F
159
 
A_
 
()
2220 (2221)
160
À
00C0
161
Â
00C2
162
È
00C8
163
Ê
00CA
164
Ë
00CB
165
Î
00CE
166
Ï
00CF
167
´
00B4
168
ˋ (`)
02CB (0060)
169
ˆ
02C6
170
¨
00A8
171
˜
02DC
172
Ù
00D9
173
Û
00DB
174
(£)
20A4 (00A3)
175
 
B_–F_
 
...
Modified HP Roman-8
_0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F

Roman-9[edit]

HP Roman-9 (also known as HP Roman 9, hp-roman9, roman9 or R9) is a slight modification of the 8-bit HP Roman-8 character set where the general currency sign (¤) at codepoint 186 (0xBA) was replaced by the euro sign (€).[29][30] It was introduced around 1999.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Stone, Artie (1983-12-01). "Two for one printer program" (PDF). Computer News - For HP Field Personnel. Hewlett-Packard. 9 (3): 32. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-17. Retrieved 2016-08-17. 
  2. ^ a b c d "MPE XL Native Language Programmer's Guide" (PDF). Hewlett-Packard. p. figure A-2 in appendix A. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-02-20. 
  3. ^ a b c "ThinkJet Printer - The Personal Printer from Hewlett-Packard - Reference Section" (PDF). Hewlett-Packard. March 1987. pp. D–2, D–3, 32. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-21. Retrieved 2016-08-21. 
  4. ^ a b Hewlett-Packard LaserJet Printer Family Soft Font Selection Guide (PDF). Hewlett-Packard. November 1986. HP-ID 26026-90924. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-17. Retrieved 2016-08-17. Roman-8 & Roman Extension: The Roman-8 and Roman Extension characters reflect the 1985 updates: 1. Six additional characters added to former blank positions. Ýý·µ¾ 2. Appearance of the lowercase đ character changed to ð. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Roman-8 Character Set Codes" (PDF). 2007-02-16. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-10. Retrieved 2016-08-10. 
  6. ^ a b c d HP 82240A Infrared Printer (PDF) (2 ed.). Corvallis, OR, USA: Hewlett Packard, Portable Computer Division. October 1986. HP reorder number 82240-90001 (82240-90008). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-06. Retrieved 2016-08-06. 
  7. ^ a b c HP 82240B Infrared Printer (1 ed.). Corvallis, OR, USA: Hewlett Packard. August 1989. pp. 17–18. HP reorder number 82240-90014. Retrieved 2016-08-01. 
  8. ^ a b "Owner's Manual - 2671A printer - 2671G graphics printer" (PDF). Hewlett-Packard. October 1982. pp. 3–7 – 3–12, 6–4 – 6–14. HP part number 02670-90015. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-20. Retrieved 2016-08-20. 
  9. ^ a b "Character Sets for HP Emulation". Attachmate. 2005-06-02. Technical Note 1179. Archived from the original on 2016-08-10. Retrieved 2016-08-10. 
  10. ^ a b "Code page 1050" (PDF). IBM. 2014-04-16. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-10. Retrieved 2016-08-10. 
  11. ^ Terry, F. Duncan (November 1978). "Versatile 400-lpm Line Printer with a Friction-Free Mechanism that Assures Long Life" (PDF). Hewlett-Packard Journal. Hewlett-Packard: 20–22. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-15. Retrieved 2016-08-15. 
  12. ^ a b Peery, Dennis L. (April 1979). "HP 250 BASIC: A Friendly, Interactive, Powerful System Language" (PDF). Hewlett-Packard Journal. Hewlett-Packard. 30 (4): 14–19. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-17. Retrieved 2016-08-17. 
  13. ^ a b Ha, Eric P. L.; Groff, James R. (June 1979). "The Integrated Display System and Terminal Access Method" (PDF). Hewlett-Packard Journal. Hewlett-Packard. 30 (6): 6–9. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-17. Retrieved 2016-08-17. 
  14. ^ a b Knoll, Alfred F.; Marschke, Norman D. (July 1979). "An Innovative Programming and Operating Console" (PDF). Hewlett-Packard Journal. Hewlett-Packard. 30 (7): 13–17. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-17. Retrieved 2016-08-17. 
  15. ^ a b Davis, Steve (1979-09-01). "European 2631A Users Beware!" (PDF). Computer Systems Newsletter - for HP Field Personnel. Hewlett-Packard. 4 (20): 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-17. Retrieved 2016-08-17. 009 - Roman Extension Set […] option 009 gives all the commonly used European characters a unique code. When this "Roman Extension" set is used in conjunction with the standard ASCII character set, the end result is a 256 character set represented by 8-bit code. The use of shift-in and shift-out characters is not required, since decimal codes 0 through 127 automatically access USASCII while codes 128 through 255 access the European characters. It IS Important to understand the differences between the two techniques and to know whlch technlque IS supported on a glven system. The HP 250 and HP 300 support the 8-bit code technlque, consequently, 2631A option 009 must be ordered to provlde local language prlntlng on these two systems. All other HP computer systems and the 264X terminals support the 7-bit code, shift-in/shift-out method. 
  16. ^ Bettencourt, Rebecca G. (2016-08-01) [1999]. "Character Encodings - Legacy Encodings - HP Roman-8". Kreative Korporation. Retrieved 2016-08-09. 
  17. ^ Rossi, Markku (March 2003) [1998]. "HP Roman-8 character set". GNU enscript. 1.58. Archived from the original on 2016-08-10. Retrieved 2016-08-10. 
  18. ^ a b "HP Roman-8, Hewlett Packard 8 Bit Character Encoding Scheme for Roman Letters (Latin)". Archived from the original on 2016-08-10. Retrieved 2016-08-10. 
  19. ^ Kostis, Kosta (2000-08-16). "HP Roman-8". 1.20. Archived from the original on 2016-03-07. Retrieved 2016-08-09. 
  20. ^ "Codepages / Ascii Table HP Roman-8". ASCII.ca. 2016 [2006]. Archived from the original on 2016-08-10. Retrieved 2016-08-10. 
  21. ^ a b c "SBCS code page information - CPGID: 01051 / Name: H-P Emulation, Roman 8". IBM Software: Globalization: Coded character sets and related resources: Code pages by CPGID: Code page identifiers. 1. IBM. 1989-05-01. C-H 3-3220-050. Archived from the original on 2016-08-09. Retrieved 2016-08-09.  [1] [2]
  22. ^ a b c "Code page 1051" (PDF). IBM. 2014-04-16. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-10. Retrieved 2016-08-10. 
  23. ^ a b HP-28S Advanced Scientific Calculator Reference Manual (PDF) (4 ed.). Hewlett-Packard. November 1988 [October 1987]. pp. 266–267. HP 00028-90068. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2015-06-08. Retrieved 2015-10-10. 
  24. ^ Nungester, Rick (1988-08-18). "Infra-Red output converter". Luc Pauwels (published 2006-10-24). Archived from the original on 2016-08-06. Retrieved 2016-08-06. 
  25. ^ a b c Prange, James M. (2006-11-02). "Re: Those solid block characters in the characters menu". HP Forum Archive 16. The Museum of HP Calculators (MoHPC). Archived from the original on 2016-08-02. Retrieved 2016-08-02. 
  26. ^ Rautenberg, Wolfgang (2004-05-09). "IOMAN - A small but powerful I/O manager for the HP49G/HP49g+". 5.2004. Archived from the original on 2016-08-02. Retrieved 2016-08-02.  [3]
  27. ^ HP 50g / 49g+ / 48gII graphing calculator advanced user’s reference manual (AUR) (2 ed.). Hewlett-Packard. 2009-07-14 [2005]. pp. 3–159, 3–160, J–1, J–2. HP F2228-90010. Retrieved 2015-10-10.  Searchable PDF
  28. ^ Michon, Gérard P. (2012-09-22). "Printer - The HP 82240B thermal printer has been standard since 1989". V'Ger HP Calculators - HP-48gII, HP-49g, HP-49g+, HP-50g - A review of top programmable calculators - Final Answers. Archived from the original on 2016-08-15. Retrieved 2016-08-14. 
  29. ^ "HP PCL/PJL Reference PCL 5 Comparison Guide" (PDF) (2 ed.). Hewlett-Packard Company, LP. June 2003. HP part-number 502-0378. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-08-10. Retrieved 2016-08-10.  [4]
  30. ^ Blackwell, Sally (2002). Lamandassa, Ingrid, ed. "The Euro Symbol € on the 3000". Hewlett-Packard, Netherlands. Archived from the original on 2016-08-10. Retrieved 2016-08-10. 

External links[edit]