Hadim Ibrahim Pasha Mosque

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Hadim Ibrahim Pasha Mosque
Basic information
Location Istanbul, Turkey
Geographic coordinates 41°00′21.6″N 28°55′21.7″E / 41.006000°N 28.922694°E / 41.006000; 28.922694Coordinates: 41°00′21.6″N 28°55′21.7″E / 41.006000°N 28.922694°E / 41.006000; 28.922694
Affiliation Islam
Country Turkey
Architectural description
Architect(s) Mimar Sinan
Architectural type mosque
Architectural style Ottoman
Completed 1551
Specifications
Dome dia. (inner) 12 m
Minaret(s) 1

The Hadim Ibrahim Pasha Mosque (Turkish: Hadım İbrahim Paşa Camii) is a 16th-century Ottoman mosque located in the Silivrikapi neighborhood of Istanbul, Turkey.

History[edit]

The Hadim Ibrahim Pasha Mosque was designed by Ottoman imperial architect Mimar Sinan for the vizier Hadim (Eunuch) Ibrahim Pasha. The building was completed in 1551.[1]

Architecture[edit]

The mosque is in the form of a domed cube with an attached portico. The main dome has a diameter of 12 metres (39 feet) and is supported by eight internal buttresses. There are three tiers of windows. The five small domes of the portico are supported by arches with marble columns.[1] The stone minaret, on the southwest end of the portico, was rebuilt in 1763-64. The mosque is similar in design to the earlier Bali Pasha Mosque in the Yenibahçe district of Istanbul which was completed in 1504-05.[2]

The mosque is decorated with a number of panels in coloured Iznik tiles. Under the portico on the north façade are three lunette panels and two roundels. The underglaze painted tiled panels have white thuluth lettering reserved on a dark cobalt blue background. Between the letters are flowers in purple and turquoise. Above the mihrab is a larger lunette panel painted in cobalt blue, turquoise and dark olive green. The purple colouring is characteristic of the 'Damascus' style of Iznik pottery but is unusual on tiles. The panels help establish the chronology of the different styles adopted by the Iznik potters.[3][4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Necipoğlu 2005, p. 392.
  2. ^ Necipoğlu 2005, p. 393-394.
  3. ^ Carswell 2006, pp. 70-71.
  4. ^ Atasoy & Raby 1989, p. 129.

References[edit]

  • Atasoy, Nurhan; Raby, Julian (1989). Iznik: The Pottery of Ottoman Turkey. London: Alexandra Press. ISBN 978-1-85669-054-6. 
  • Carswell, John (2006) [1998]. Iznik Pottery. London: British Museum Press. ISBN 978-0-7141-2441-4. 
  • Necipoğlu, Gülru (2005). The Age of Sinan: Architectural Culture in the Ottoman Empire. London: Reaktion Books. ISBN 978-1-86189-253-9. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]