Hadjer-Lamis Region

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Hadjer-Lamis Region
حجر لميس
Hadjer-Lamis Region
Location of Hadjer-Lamis region in Chad
Location of Hadjer-Lamis region in Chad
Country Chad
Departments 3
Sub-prefectures 9
Government
 • Governor Haroun Saleh (since 2007)
Area
 • Total 30,000 km2 (10,000 sq mi)
Population (2009 census)
 • Total 562,957
 • Density 18.9/km2 (49/sq mi)

Hadjer-Lamis (Arabic: حجر لميس‎‎) is one of the 23 regions of Chad. It is located in the southwest of the country. The capital is Massakory. It corresponds to part of the former prefecture of Chari-Baguirmi (sub-prefectures of Bokoro and of Massakory and part of N'Djamena).

Per the census of 2009, the total population in the region was 562,957, 50.1% females. The total number of households was 110,170: it was 93,126 in rural areas and 17,044 in urban areas. The number of nomads in the region was 26,615, 6.9% of the total population.

Geography[edit]

The region has a general elevation of 240 m (790 ft) in the Lake Chad Depression towards the Guera Massif located at an elevation of 1,800 m (5,900 ft), and extends eastwards towards the mountainous Saharan region which has an elevation of 3,350 m (10,990 ft). The only rivers in the country of importance are Chari and Logone, flowing into Lake Chad. The region receives an annual rainfall of 744 mm (29.3 in) and has vegetational zones. The region is the principal agricultural region of the entire country, producing cotton and groundnut, the two main cash crops of the country. There are a variety of local crops like rice that are also grown in the region.[1] Hadjer-Lamis is one of the 23 regions of Chad and the Head Post Office of the region is located in the capital. As of 2015, internet and telephone services were limited and post was the primary mode of communication.[2]

Demographics[edit]

Per the census of 2009, the total population in the region was 562,957, 50.1% females. The average size of household as of 2009 was 5.1 : it was 5.1 in rural households, while it was 4.7 in urban areas. The total number of households was 110,170: it was 93,126 in rural areas and 17,044 in urban areas. The number of nomads in the region was 26,615, 6.90% of the total population. There were 559,339 people residing in private households. There were 239,133 above 18 years of age: 115,212 male and 123,921 female. The sex ratio was 100.00 for every hundred males. There were 536,342 sedentary staff, 5% of the total population.[3]

Administration[edit]

Chad became independent in 1961 from the French Colonial Empire. On account of ensuing political instability and local civil wars, it continued as a one party democracy till 1991, while other parties were also allowed. All the powers rested centrally with the President.[4] As a part of decentralization in February 2003, the country is administratively split into regions, departments, municipalities and rural communities. The prefectures which were originally 14 in number were re-designated in 17 regions. The regions are administered by Governors appointed by the President. The Prefects, who originally held the responsibility of the 14 prefects, still retained the titles and were responsible for the administration of smaller departments in each region. The members of local assemblies are elected every six years, while the executive organs are elected every three years. The region of Hadjer-Lamis is divided into three departments, namely, Dababa (capital Bokoro), Dagana (capital Massakory) and Haraze Al Biar (capital Massaguet ).[5] As of 2016, there are totally 23 regions in Chad, which are divided based on population and administrative convenience.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hilling, David (2004). "Chad - Physical and Social Geography". Africa South of the Sahara 2004. Psychology Press. p. 218. ISBN 9781857431834. 
  2. ^ Falola, Toyin; Jean-Jacques, Daniel (2015). Africa: An Encyclopedia of Culture and Society [3 volumes]: An Encyclopedia of Culture and Society. ABC-CLIO. p. 251. ISBN 9781598846669. 
  3. ^ "Census of Chad". National Institute of Statistical, Economic and Demographic Studies, Chad. 2009. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  4. ^ "Chad profile - Timeline". BBC. 2 August 2016. Retrieved 20 November 2016. 
  5. ^ Republic of Chad Public Administration and Country profile (PDF) (Report). Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), United Nations. 2004. p. 9. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  6. ^ Chad district map (PDF) (Report). Department of Field Support,Cartographic Section, United Nations. Retrieved 20 November 2016.