Hadrosauroidea

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Hadrosauroids
Temporal range: Early-Late Cretaceous, 130–66 Ma
Tethyshadros insularis.JPG
Holotype skeleton of Tethyshadros insularis
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Clade: Dinosauria
Order: Ornithischia
Suborder: Ornithopoda
Clade: Hadrosauriformes
Superfamily: Hadrosauroidea
Cope, 1869
Type species
Hadrosaurus foulkii
Leidy, 1858
Subgroups
Synonyms

Hadrosauroidea is a clade or superfamily of ornithischian dinosaurs that includes the "duck-billed" dinosaurs, or hadrosaurids, and all dinosaurs more closely related to them than to Iguanodon. Many primitive hadrosauroids, such as the Asian Probactrosaurus and Altirhinus, have traditionally been included in a paraphyletic (unnatural grouping) "Iguanodontidae". With cladistic analysis, the traditional Iguanodontidae has been largely disbanded, and probably includes only Iguanodon and perhaps its closest relatives.

Classification[edit]

The cladogram below follows an analysis by Andrew McDonald, 2012, and shows the position of Hadrosauroidea within Styracosterna.[1]

Styracosterna

Uteodon aphanoecetes





Hippodraco scutodens



Theiophytalia kerri





Iguanacolossus fortis




Lanzhousaurus magnidens




Kukufeldia tilgatensis




Barilium dawsoni


Hadrosauriformes

Iguanodon bernissartensis


Hadrosauroidea

Mantellisaurus atherfieldensis



Other hadrosauroids










The cladogram below follows an analysis by Wu Wenhao and Pascal Godefroit (2012).[2]

Hadrosauriformes 
 Iguanodontidae 

Iguanodon




Ouranosaurus



Mantellisaurus




 Hadrosauroidea 

Bolong




Equijubus




Jinzhousaurus




Altirhinus




Batyrosaurus




Probactrosaurus




Eolambia




Protohadros




Bactrosaurus



Levnesovia




Shuangmiaosaurus




Tethyshadros




Telmatosaurus



Hadrosauridae















Cladogram after Prieto-Marquez and Norell (2010).[3]

Hadrosauroidea 


Jinzhousaurus



Penelopognathus





Equijubus




Probactrosaurus





Eolambia



Protohadros





Tanius




Bactrosaurus




Gilmoreosaurus




Telmatosaurus




Shuangmiaosaurus



Nanyangosaurus



Lophorhothon



Hadrosauridae











A phylogenetic analysis performed by Ramírez-Velasco et al. (2012) found a big polytomy of all hadrosauroids which are more derived than Probactrosaurus but less derived than Hadrosauridae. The exclusion of Claosaurus, Jeyawati, Levnesovia, Nanyangosaurus, Shuangmiaosaurus and Telmatosaurus from the polytomy resulted in a more resolved topology.[4]

Hadrosauroidea 

Jinzhousaurus yangi




Fukuisaurus tetoriensis




Penelopognathus weishampeli




Equijubus normani




Probactrosaurus gobiensis





Eolambia caroljonesa



Protohadros byrdi





Tanius sinensis





Bactrosaurus johnsoni



Glishades ericksoni





Gilmoreosaurus mongoliensis




Huehuecanauhtlus tiquichensis





Jintasaurus meniscus



Tethyshadros insularis




Hadrosauridae













See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McDonald, A. T. (2012). Farke, Andrew A, ed. "Phylogeny of Basal Iguanodonts (Dinosauria: Ornithischia): An Update". PLoS ONE. 7 (5): e36745. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0036745. PMC 3358318Freely accessible. PMID 22629328. 
  2. ^ Wu Wenhao; Pascal Godefroit (2012). "Anatomy and Relationships of Bolong yixianensis, an Early Cretaceous Iguanodontoid Dinosaur from Western Liaoning, China". In Godefroit, P. Bernissart Dinosaurs and Early Cretaceous Terrestrial Ecosystems. Indiana University Press. pp. 293–333. 
  3. ^ Albert Prieto-Marquez & Mark A. Norell (2010). "Anatomy and Relationships of Gilmoreosaurus mongoliensis (Dinosauria: Hadrosauroidea) from the Late Cretaceous of Central Asia" (PDF). American Museum Novitates. 3694: 1–52. doi:10.1206/3694.2. ISSN 0003-0082. 
  4. ^ Angel Alejandro Ramírez-Velasco; Mouloud Benammi; Albert Prieto-Márquez; Jesús Alvarado Ortega; René Hernández-Rivera (2012). "Huehuecanauhtlus tiquichensis, a new hadrosauroid dinosaur (Ornithischia: Ornithopoda) from the Santonian (Late Cretaceous) of Michoacán, Mexico". Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences. 49 (2): 379–395. doi:10.1139/e11-062.