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Renal Cell Carcinoma.jpg
A chromophobe renal cell carcinoma viewed on a hematoxylin & eosin stained slide.
System Blood
Subdivisions Hematological oncology
Significant diseases Malaria, Thalassemia, Leukemia, Clotting disorders, Anemia
Significant tests Blood film, Coagulation tests, Bone marrow aspirate
Specialist Hematologist

Hematology, also spelled haematology (from the Greek αἷμα, haima "blood" and -λoγία), is the branch of medicine concerned with the study, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases related to the blood. Hematology includes the study of etiology.[1] It involves treating diseases that affect the production of blood and its components, such as blood cells, hemoglobin, blood proteins, bone marrow, platelets, blood vessels, spleen, and the mechanism of coagulation. The laboratory work that goes into the study of blood is frequently performed by a medical technologist or medical laboratory scientist. Hematologists also conduct studies in oncology and work with oncologists, people who may specialize only in that field instead of both-the medical treatment of cancer. There are various disorders that people are affected by. A few of these different types of blood conditions that are looked at include anemia, hemophilia, general blood clots, bleeding disorders,etc. As for related blood cancers such as leukemia, myeloma, and lymphoma, these are more serious cases that need to be diagnosed.

To begin in this career, hematologists complete a four-year medical degree which is followed by three or four more years, depending on the person, in residency or internship programs. After completing that, they further expand their knowledge of hematology by spending two or three more years learning how to experiment, diagnose, and treat blood disorders. When applying for this career, most job openings look for first hand practical experiences in a recognized training program that provides practice in the following: Cause of abnormalities in formation of blood and other disorders, diagnosis of numerous blood related conditions or cancers using experimentation, and the proper care and treatment of patients in

the best manner.

Physicians specialized in hematology are known as hematologists or haematologists. Their routine work mainly includes the care and treatment of patients with hematological diseases, although some may also work at the hematology laboratory viewing blood films and bone marrow slides under the microscope, interpreting various hematological test results and blood clotting test results. In some institutions, hematologists also manage the hematology laboratory. Physicians who work in hematology laboratories, and most commonly manage them, are pathologists specialized in the diagnosis of hematological diseases, referred to as hematopathologists or haematopathologists. Hematologists and hematopathologists generally work in conjunction to formulate a diagnosis and deliver the most appropriate therapy if needed. Most may consider hematologists to only diagnose the blood, but that isn't entirely true. Hematologists observe and find the right treatment first, then sit down and deliver the various types of treatments fitted for that particular being. No one being is exactly the same, just as each organism has its individual genes that cause an issue in their blood, each organism has a different reaction to different treatments. It is essential hematologists look in depth and deliver the message immediately with the right diagnostics. Hematology is a distinct subspecialty of internal medicine, separate from but overlapping with the subspecialty of medical oncology. Hematologists may specialize further or have special interests, for example, in:


(abnormality of the hemoglobin molecule or of the rate of hemoglobin synthesis)


Treatments include:


Names Medical Specialist
Occupation type
Activity sectors
Education required

Alphabetical lists[edit]



  1. ^ "Hematology". 

External links[edit]