Haft-sin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Haft-Seen)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
The painting depicts Haft-seen symbols of Nowruz being related to elements of Fire, Earth, Air, Water, and the three life forms of Humans, Animals and Plants.
Haft-seen table.

Haftsin (Persian: هفت‌سین) is an arrangement of seven symbolic items whose names start with the letter "س" (pronounced as "seen"), the 15th letter in the Persian alphabet; "haft" (هفت) is Persian for "seven".[1][2] It is traditionally displayed at Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, which is celebrated on the day of the vernal equinox, marking the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere.

Items of Haft-seen[edit]

a haft-seen table in Piranshahr, Kurdistan Province, Iran

The following are the primary items of Haft-sin, whose Persian names begin with the letter sin in the Persian alphabet.[1][2]

  1. Sabzeh (سبزه) – wheat, barley, mung bean, or lentil sprouts grown in a dish.
  2. Samanu (سمنو) – wheat germ sweet pudding.
  3. Senjed (سنجد) – Oleaster
  4. Serkeh (سرکه) – vinegar.
  5. Seeb (سیب) – apple.
  6. Seer (سیر) – garlic.
Senjed
Sonbol
Somāq

Coins (سکه sekke), hyacinth (سنبل sombol), and clock (ساعت suat also pronounced so-at) are sometimes included too. Other symbolic items that are typically used to accompany Haft-sin include a mirror, candles, painted eggs, goldfish, and traditional Persian confections.

A "book of wisdom" is also commonly included, which might be the Quran, Avesta, the Shahnameh, or the Divān of Hafez.[1]

Symbolic Roots of Haft-seen[edit]

The Haft-Seen table represents nature. By tradition, Iranian families take great pains to create the most beautiful Haft-Seen table that they can, for not only does it embody values both traditional and spiritual, it is also appreciated by the visitors during Nowruz visiting exchanges as a reflection of the families' aesthetic sense and good taste.

Items that start with Persian letter "س":

  • Sabzeh (سبزه): Sprouting /Grass: the symbol of rebirth and growth.
  • Samanu (سمنو): the symbol of power and strength.
  • Senjed (سنجد): the symbol of love.
  • Somāq (سماق): Sumac: the symbol of sunrise.
  • Serkeh (سرکه): Vinegar: the symbol of patience.
  • Seeb (سیب): Apple: the symbol of beauty.
  • Seer (سیر): Garlic: the symbol of health and medicine.

Other items that start with Persian letter "س" that are sometimes included:

  • Sonbol (سنبل): Hyacinth: the symbol of spring's arrival.
  • Sekkeh (سکه): Coin: the symbol of wealth and prosperity.
  • Saat (ساعت): Clock: the symbol of time.

Items that don't start with "س" but, nonetheless, are invariably included:

  • Tokhm-e Morg Rangi (تخم‌مرغ رنگی): Eggs: the symbol of fertility.
  • Ayina (آینه): Mirror: the symbol of self-reflection.
  • Shem'a (شمع): Candle: the symbol of enlightenment.
  • Maahi-ye Qırmız (ماهی قرمز): Goldfish: the symbol of progress.
  • Ketaab (کتاب): Book: the symbol of wisdom.

Afghan Haft Mewa[edit]

In Afghanistan, people prepare Haft Mēwa (Persian: هفت‌میوه) (literally translates as Seven Fruits) in addition to or instead of Haft Seen which is common in Iran. Haft Mewa is like a fruit salad made from seven different dried fruits, served in their own syrup. The seven dried fruits are: raisins, Senjed (the dried fruit of the oleaster tree), pistachios, hazelnuts, prunes (dried apricots), walnuts and either almonds or another species of plum fruit.[3][4]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Campo, Juan Eduardo (2009). "Navruz". Encyclopedia of Islam. Infobase Publishing. pp. 524–525. Archived from the original on 2017-10-14. Retrieved 2018-04-17.
  2. ^ a b "Noruz, manifestation of culture of peace, friendship among societies". Tehran Times. April 7, 2018. Archived from the original on April 18, 2018. Retrieved April 17, 2018.
  3. ^ Sethi, Simran (2022-03-21). "Nowruz is banned in Afghanistan, but families continue to celebrate". NPR. Archived from the original on 2022-04-28. Retrieved 2022-04-29.
  4. ^ Deravian, Naz (2022-03-14). "For Afghans Abroad, Nowruz Is a Chance to Reflect". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on 2022-04-29. Retrieved 2022-04-29.

External links[edit]

  • Shahbazi, A. Shapur (March 1, 2012). "HAFT SIN". Encyclopaedia Iranica. Vol. XI. pp. 524–526.