Hagrite

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The Hagrites (also spelled Hagarite or Hagerite, and called Hagarenes, Agarenes, and sons of Agar) were associated with the Ishmaelites mentioned in the Bible, the inhabitants of the regions of Jetur, Naphish and Nodab lying east of Gilead.[1] Their name is understood to be related to that of the biblical Hagar. They lived a nomadic, animal-herding lifestyle in sparsely populated land east of the Israelites.[2]

According to First Chronicles 5:18-22, the Reubenites, Gadites, and the half of the tribe of Manasseh in Gilead brought 44,760 to battle with the Hagrites and defeated them. Through the battle, the Reubenites captured the Hagrite land as well as 50,000 camels, 250,000 sheep, 2,000 donkeys. Finally, the Reubenites captured 100,000 Hagrites, men, women and children and held them as captives. According to Theodor Nöldeke, these numbers are "enormously exaggerated."[3]

The Hagrites are no longer mentioned as a distinct people after the reign of King David.

Due to the Israelite feud with the Hagrites, Asaph uttered a harsh prayer against them in Psalms 83:6. On the other hand, King David of Israel ignored the feud and made Jazziz the Hagrite steward of his flocks.

References[edit]

  • Comfort, Philip and Walter Elwell. Tyndale Bible Dictionary. Wheaton, Illinois: Tyndale House Publishers, 2001. ISBN 0-8423-7089-7
  1. ^ For "sons of Agar," see Baruch 3:23, Revised Version. For Agarenes see Baruch 3:23, King James Bible.
  2. ^ Theodor Nöldeke (1899). "Hagar". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 
  3. ^ Thedor Nöldeke (1899). "Hagar". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Shutherland Black. Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. 2, E-K. New York: The Macmillan Company. 

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