Haifanggou Formation

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Haifanggou Formation
Stratigraphic range: Middle Jurassic
Type Geological formation
Underlies Tiaojishan Formation
Overlies Beipiao Formation
Lithology
Primary Conglomerate
Other Sandstone, mudstone, coal
Location
Region Inner Mongolia
Country  China

The Haifanggou Formation (also known as the Jiulongshan Formation) is a fossil-bearing rock deposit located near Daohugou village of Ningcheng County, in nner Mongolia, northeastern China.

The rocks consists of coarse conglomerates, sandstone, mudstone, and thin coal layers.

The formation dates from the Middle Jurassic.[1]

Fauna[edit]

Color key
Taxon Reclassified taxon Taxon falsely reported as present Dubious taxon or junior synonym Ichnotaxon Ootaxon Morphotaxon
Notes
Uncertain or tentative taxa are in small text; crossed out taxa are discredited.

Arthropods[edit]

Insects of the Haifanggou Formation
Genus Species Year of description Abundance Notes Images

A. neimengguensis[2]

2008

A tangle-veined fly

A. musicus[3]

2012

1 specimen

A stem-katydid

F. macularis[4]

2008

1 specimen

A hangingfly

J. astictus[4]

2008

1 specimen

A hangingfly

M. dunlopi[5]

2012

1 specimen

A harvestman

M. daohugoensis[6]

2007

1 specimen

A hangingfly

S. ningchengensis[7]

2008

An aphid

2013

A Mecopteran

2013

A Mecopteran

Vertebrates[edit]

Genus Species Year of description Notes Images
Chunerpeton[9] C. tianyiensis 2003 A cryptobranchid salamander
Castorocauda[10] C. lutrasimilis 2006 A docodont (early mammal)

Flora[edit]

Plants of the Haifanggou Formation
Genus Species State Abundance Notes Images

S. sinensis[11]

Liaoning

A possible early flowering plant

X. sinensis[12]

Liaoning

An early flowering plant

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Ji, S.; Yang, Z. (2006). "U-Pb zircon age for the Daohugou Biota at Ningcheng of Inner Mongolia and comments on related issues". Chinese Science Bulletin. 51 (21): 2634–2644. doi:10.1007/s11434-006-2165-2. 
  2. ^ Zhang, K.; Yang, D.; Ren, D.; Ge, F. (2008). "New Middle Jurassic tangle−veined flies from Inner Mongolia, China". Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 53 (1): 161–164. doi:10.4202/app.2008.0112. 
  3. ^ Gu J.-J., Montealegre-Z, F., Robert, D., Engel, M.S., Qiao G.-X., and Ren D. (2012). "Wing stridulation in a Jurassic katydid (Insecta, Orthoptera) produced low-pitched musical calls to attract females." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, (advance online publication) doi:10.1073/pnas.1118372109
  4. ^ a b Li, Y-L.; Ren, D.; Shih, C-K (2008). "Two Middle Jurassic hanging-flies (Insecta: Mecoptera: Bittacidae) from Northeast China" (PDF). Zootaxa. 1929: 38–46. ISSN 1175-5334. 
  5. ^ Giribet, G., et al., 2012. An exquisitely preserved harvestman (Arthropoda, Arachnida, Opiliones) from the Middle Jurassic of China. Organisms, Diversity & Evolution, 12, p.51-56.
  6. ^ Petrulevicius, J. F.; Huang, D-Y.; Ren, D. (2007). "A new hangingfly (Insecta: Mecoptera: Bittacidae) from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China" (PDF). African Invertebrates. 48 (1): 145–152. 
  7. ^ Huang, D.; Nel, A. (2008). "A new Middle Jurassic aphid family (Insecta: Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Sinojuraphididae fam. nov.) from Inner Mongolia, China". Palaeontology. 51 (3): 715–719. doi:10.1111/j.1475-4983.2008.00773.x. 
  8. ^ a b Wang, Qi; Shih, Chungkun; Ren, Dong; Carrier, David (2013). "The Earliest Case of Extreme Sexual Display with Exaggerated Male Organs by Two Middle Jurassic Mecopterans". PLoS ONE. 8 (8): e71378. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071378. PMC 3743757Freely accessible. PMID 23977031. 
  9. ^ Gao, Ke-Qin; Shubin, Neil H. (2003). "Earliest known crown-group salamanders". Nature. 422 (6930): 424–428. doi:10.1038/nature01491. PMID 12660782. 
  10. ^ {https://www.sciencemag.org/content/311/5764/1123.full.pdf}
  11. ^ Xin Wing; Shuying Duan; Baoyin Geng; Jinzhong Cui; Yong Yang (2007). "Schmeissneria: A missing link to angiosperms?". BMC Evolutionary Biology. 7: 14. doi:10.1186/1471-2148-7-14. PMC 1805421Freely accessible. PMID 17284326. 
  12. ^ Xin WANG; and Shijun WANG (2010). "Xingxueanthus: An Enigmatic Jurassic Seed Plant and Its Implications for the Origin of Angiospermy". Acta Geologica Sinica - English Edition. 84 (1): 47–55. doi:10.1111/j.1755-6724.2010.00169.x. 
Jurassic Period
Lower/Early Jurassic Middle Jurassic Upper/Late Jurassic
Hettangian | Sinemurian
Pliensbachian | Toarcian
Aalenian | Bajocian
Bathonian | Callovian
Oxfordian | Kimmeridgian
Tithonian