Half Chance Iron Bridge

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Half-Chance Bridge)
Jump to: navigation, search
Half Chance Bridge
Half-chance bridge.JPG
Coordinates 32°18′50″N 87°42′14″W / 32.314°N 87.704°W / 32.314; -87.704Coordinates: 32°18′50″N 87°42′14″W / 32.314°N 87.704°W / 32.314; -87.704
Crosses Chickasaw Bogue Creek
Locale Half Chance, Alabama
Official name Half Chance Iron Bridge
Characteristics
Design tied-arch bridge
Material wrought iron
Width 12 feet (3.7 m)
Longest span 100 feet (30 m)
History
Constructed by King Bridge Company
Construction end 1880
Half-Chance Bridge
Half Chance Iron Bridge is located in Alabama
Half Chance Iron Bridge
Half Chance Iron Bridge is located in the US
Half Chance Iron Bridge
Location Marengo County, Alabama, United States
Nearest city Dayton, Alabama
Coordinates 32°18′44″N 87°42′04″W / 32.31222°N 87.70111°W / 32.31222; -87.70111Coordinates: 32°18′44″N 87°42′04″W / 32.31222°N 87.70111°W / 32.31222; -87.70111
Area less than one acre
Built 1880
Architect King Iron Bridge Manufacturing Company
NRHP reference # 72000166[1][2]
Added to NRHP September 14, 1972

The Half Chance Iron Bridge, also known as the Half-Chance Bridge, is a historic single span wrought iron bridge located near the small community of Half Chance, between the towns of Linden and Dayton in rural Marengo County, Alabama. It is on Marengo County Road 39 over Chickasaw Bogue Creek.[1] The bridge is the oldest surviving iron bridge in Alabama, making it an important transportation and engineering landmark for the state.[1]

County Road 39 has been moved over the years. The Half Chance Iron Bridge is approximately 1/4 mi. to the South and on private property.

Half Chance Iron Bridge is a 12-foot (3.7 m) wide tied-arch bridge with a span of 100 feet (30 m). It was built by the King Iron Bridge Manufacturing Company of Cleveland, Ohio in 1880.[1] King Iron Bridge Manufacturing Company was founded in 1871 by Zenas King. As early as 1878 it was manufacturing many types of truss, combination, and wooden bridges and by the 1880s it was the largest highway bridge works in the United States.[3]

Bridge was reported as destroyed in a flood between 2008 and 2012. Structure does not exist anymore.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ "Alabama: Marengo County". "Nationalhistoricalregister.com". Retrieved 2008-03-05. 
  3. ^ "King Iron Bridge & Manufacturing Company". "The Cleveland Memory Project". Retrieved 2008-03-05. 
  4. ^ "Half Chance Iron Bridge". Retrieved 7 April 2017.