Hall County, Texas

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Hall County, Texas
Hall Co Courthouse Memphis, TX.JPG
The Hall County Courthouse in Memphis
Map of Texas highlighting Hall County
Location in the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1890
Named for Warren D. C. Hall
Seat Memphis
Largest city Memphis
Area
 • Total 904 sq mi (2,341 km2)
 • Land 883 sq mi (2,287 km2)
 • Water 21 sq mi (54 km2), 2.3%
Population
 • (2010) 3,353
 • Density 3.8/sq mi (1.5/km2)
Congressional district 13th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5

Hall County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population is 3,353.[1] Its county seat is Memphis.[2] The county was created in 1876 and later organized in 1890.[3] It is named for Warren D. C. Hall, a secretary of war for the Republic of Texas.[4]

Republican Drew Springer, Jr., a businessman from Muenster in Cooke County, has since January 2013 represented Hall County in the Texas House of Representatives. He succeeded Rick Hardcastle of Vernon, who retired after 14 years in the position.[5]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 904 square miles (2,340 km2), of which 883 square miles (2,290 km2) are land and 21 square miles (54 km2) (3.8%) are covered by water.[6]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
188036
18907031,852.8%
19001,660136.1%
19108,279398.7%
192011,13734.5%
193016,96652.3%
194012,117−28.6%
195010,930−9.8%
19607,322−33.0%
19706,015−17.9%
19805,594−7.0%
19903,905−30.2%
20003,782−3.1%
20103,353−11.3%
Est. 20163,138[7]−6.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1850–2010[9] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[10] of 2000, 3,782 people, 1,548 households, and 1,013 families resided in the county. The population density was 4 people per square mile (2/km²). The 1,988 housing units averaged 2 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 71.97% White, 8.22% Black or African American, 0.53% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 17.90% from other races, and 1.22% from two or more races. About 27.50% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 1,548 households, 28.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.70% were married couples living together, 9.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.50% were not families; 32.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the county, the population was distributed as 27.20% under the age of 18, 6.80% from 18 to 24, 22.10% from 25 to 44, 22.40% from 45 to 64, and 21.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $23,016, and for a family was $27,325. Males had a median income of $22,167 versus $19,050 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,210. About 21.60% of families and 26.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 39.80% of those under age 18 and 16.30% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Hall County is served by these districts:

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Ghost Towns[edit]

Notable people[edit]

At one time, the JA Ranch, founded by Charles Goodnight and John George Adair, which reached into six counties, held acreage in Hall County. Minnie Lou Bradley, matriarch of the Bradley 3 Ranch in nearby Childress County, claims a Hall County address.

Politics[edit]

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 81.9% 893 15.0% 164 3.1% 34
2012 75.0% 832 23.9% 265 1.1% 12
2008 73.6% 930 25.6% 324 0.8% 10
2004 67.4% 860 32.3% 413 0.3% 4
2000 66.8% 966 32.6% 472 0.6% 8
1996 42.5% 626 51.0% 750 6.5% 96
1992 36.8% 631 47.8% 819 15.4% 264
1988 41.0% 714 59.0% 1,029
1984 51.7% 1,058 48.1% 984 0.2% 3
1980 51.4% 1,141 47.6% 1,057 1.0% 22
1976 29.0% 671 70.6% 1,633 0.4% 10
1972 67.4% 1,303 31.4% 607 1.2% 24
1968 33.8% 753 46.7% 1,038 19.5% 434
1964 27.2% 667 72.8% 1,785 0.0% 1
1960 44.0% 939 55.9% 1,192 0.1% 2
1956 31.5% 687 68.2% 1,487 0.2% 5
1952 41.8% 1,253 58.2% 1,744 0.1% 2
1948 7.3% 174 89.3% 2,122 3.4% 80
1944 7.8% 164 86.0% 1,812 6.3% 132
1940 9.0% 219 90.8% 2,221 0.2% 5
1936 5.4% 126 93.6% 2,195 1.1% 25
1932 4.1% 91 95.3% 2,114 0.6% 13
1928 74.1% 1,409 25.9% 493
1924 16.9% 229 78.3% 1,060 4.7% 64
1920 16.1% 194 76.6% 922 7.3% 88
1916 4.6% 49 86.6% 925 8.8% 94
1912 2.5% 24 79.8% 773 17.8% 172

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved May 24, 2015. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 147. 
  5. ^ "State Rep. Springer announces district tour July 30". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, July 16, 2013. Retrieved July 18, 2013. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 28, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 28, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved April 28, 2015. 
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  11. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-07-25. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°31′N 100°41′W / 34.52°N 100.69°W / 34.52; -100.69