Halloween Night

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Halloween Night
Halloween Night dvd.jpg
DVD cover
Directed byMark Atkins
Written byMichael Gingold
Story byDavid Michael Latt
Produced byDavid Michael Latt
Sherri Strain
StarringDerek Osedach
Rebekah Kochan
Scot Nery
CinematographyDavid Michael Latt
Edited byMark Atkins
Music byMel Lewis
Production
company
Distributed byThe Asylum
Release date
  • October 24, 2006 (2006-10-24)
Running time
110 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Halloween Night is a 2006 American slasher mockbuster film produced by The Asylum.

Plot[edit]

The film follows Chris Vale (Scot Nery), who was admitted to an asylum at the age of 12 after witnessing his mother's rape and murder by two thugs hired by his father (who subsequently committed suicide). Chris barely survived having his face burned by one of the thugs. Now a 22-year-old grossly disfigured young man, he escapes from the asylum on Halloween after killing two orderlies who mock his wearing of masks that resemble those the thugs were wearing.

His old home is now inhabited by David Bexter's (Derek Osedach) family; Bexter hosts a Halloween party there with his girlfriend Shannon (Rebekah Kochan), his friends, and his schoolmates. Vale kills a party-goer named Todd (Nicholas Daly Clark) at a gas station, steals his costume and car, and drives to the party.

At the party, Vale is taken for Todd by everyone and starts a killing spree unnoticed. Meanwhile, David fakes a dispute with a friend who kidnaps Vale (still mistaken for Todd) with a gun and another friend disguised as a police officer, who is forced to hand over his car keys. After escaping with the car, the kidnapper is murdered by Vale, who goes back to the party in it. Because someone at the party has called the real police, the angry officer ends the party by telling everyone to go home, leaving only David, the now disappointed Shannon, and some friends.

Vale enters the house again, kills several of the remaining people, and ties up Shannon, who is wearing his mother's collar found in the house earlier. He breaks up a hole in the wall covered with boards where his father hid his mother's corpse before committing suicide.

As one girl escapes from the house in a panic, David begins to search for Shannon, finding her captured in the basement. After freeing her, Vale knocks David out from behind, but Shannon manages to grab a gun that Vale has lost, shooting him twice, presuming the killer for dead.

As the police and ambulance arrive later, David seems to have disappeared with the police searching for him. Suddenly a hooded person appears behind a police officer talking to Shannon. Shannon grabs the officer's gun, shooting and killing the hooded person. After removing the hood, she is shocked to see that she killed David.

In the final scene, Vale is seen hitch-hiking and picked up by a car driver, who presumes him to be having a long Halloween party night. The film ends while the car leaves.

Cast[edit]

  • Derek Osedach as David Baxter
  • Rebekah Kochan as Shannon
  • Scot Nery as Christopher Vale
  • Sean Durrie as Larry
  • Alicia Klein as Tracy
  • Erica Roby as Angela
  • Amanda Ward as Kendall
  • Jared Cohn as Daryll (as Jared Michaels)
  • Jay Costelo as Eddie
  • Michael Schatz as The Troll
  • Amelia Jackson-Gray as Jeanine
  • Nicholas Daly Clark as Todd
  • Tank Murdoch as Officer Connors
  • Stephanie Christine Medina as Kim
  • Jonathan Weber as Charlie
  • Shaun Dallas as Tom

Reception[edit]

Cinema Crazed panned the movie, writing "as a "Halloween" wannabe, it's horrible, but as a slasher film on its own merits it's horrible".[1] HorrorNews.net criticized some aspects of the film but also wrote "You get what you signed up for and therefore should be satisfied with that fact alone. Production is slick, score is eerie and the acting makes sense."[2] Dread Central also heavily criticized the film, stating "Halloween Night is stupid slasher flick that’s sporadically amusing but mostly dull due to pacing issues, the predictable nature of the “seen it a million times before” storyline, and its insistence on taking itself far too seriously even when it's being outright dumb."[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vasquez Jr., Felix. "Halloween Night (2006)". Cinema Crazed. Retrieved 2016-02-07.
  2. ^ "Film Review: Halloween Night (2006)". Horrornews.net. Retrieved 2016-02-07.
  3. ^ "Halloween Night (DVD)". Dread Central. Retrieved 2016-02-07.

External links[edit]