Halloween pennant

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Halloween pennant
Celithemis eponina (Halloween Pennant).jpg
at Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, Florida

Secure (NatureServe)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Odonata
Suborder: Anisoptera
Family: Libellulidae
Genus: Celithemis
Species: C. eponina
Binomial name
Celithemis eponina
(Drury, 1773)

The Halloween pennant (Celithemis eponina) is a species of dragonfly in the family Libellulidae. It is native to eastern North America, including Ontario in Canada and the United States as far west as Colorado.[1]

Description[edit]

The Halloween pennant has been described as looking very similar to a butterfly. Its wings are entirely orange-yellow in color with dark brown bands, the Halloween inspiration for its common name.[2] Dragonflies of its genus perch at the tips of plants, waving in the breeze like pennants.[3] The young has yellow markings, including a stripe on its back. The adult male and female may develop pale red markings, especially on the face. This species is about 38 to 42 millimeters long.[4][5][6]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

This species occurs in eastern North America. In the southern part of its range it is in season all year round. In northern latitudes it can be seen from mid-June to mid-August.[4][6] It ranges as far north as southern Canada and as far west as the United States east of the Rocky Mountains. It lives in wet habitat types such as ponds, marshes and lakes, where it perches on vegetation.[5][7]

Biology[edit]

The female lays eggs in the morning on open water with the male still attached at the head. This method is known as exophytic egg laying.[5][8] Sexual activity normally occurs between 8:00 and 10:30 am.[6] Males rest on vegetation to await the females' arrival.[4] This species is not territorial.[9]

The Halloween pennant feeds on other insects.[4] It is able to fly in rain and strong wind.[5] On hot days, it will often shade its thorax using its wings.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ NatureServe. 2015. Celithemis eponina. NatureServe Explorer. Version 7.1. Accessed February 9, 2016.
  2. ^ Taber, S. W. (2005). Invertebrates of Central Texas Wetlands. Texas Tech University Press. p. 56. ISBN 0-89672-550-2. Retrieved 31 October 2008. The common name is a good one, for the wings are entirely orange-yellow with the exception of the bands, which are dark brown rather than black. 
  3. ^ Eaton, E. R. (2007). Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America. HMCo Field Guides. p. 50. ISBN 0-618-15310-1. Retrieved 31 October 2008. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Species Celithemis eponina - Halloween Pennant". BugGuide. Retrieved 2008-10-22. 
  5. ^ a b c d Taber, S. W. (2005). Invertebrates of Central Texas Wetlands. Texas Tech University Press. p. 56. ISBN 0-89672-550-2. 
  6. ^ a b c d Dunkle, S. W. (2000). Dragonflies Through Binoculars. Oxford University Press US. p. 233. ISBN 0-19-511268-7. 
  7. ^ Eaton, Eric R. (2007). Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America. HMCo Field Guides. p. 50. ISBN 0-618-15310-1. 
  8. ^ Lawlor, Elizabeth P. (2000). Discover Nature in Water & Wetlands. Stackpole Books. p. 87. ISBN 0-8117-2731-9. 
  9. ^ Bried, J., & Ervin, G. (2006). Abundance patterns of dragonflies along a wetland buffer. Wetlands, 3(26), 878-883.