Haltemprice

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Obsolete Arms of the Former Haltemprice Urban District Council

Haltemprice is an area in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England, directly to the west of Hull. Originally an extra-parochial area, it became a civil parish in 1858, in 1935 it was expanded by the combination of the urban districts of Cottingham, Anlaby, and Sculcoates to form a new urban district; the district included the villages of Anlaby, Cottingham, Hessle, Kirk Ella, Skidby, West Ella and Willerby. Urban districts were abolished 1974.

As of 2012 Haltemprice gives its name to the Haltemprice and Howden (UK Parliament constituency), and the East Riding of Yorkshire Council run 'Haltemprice Leisure Centre' in Anlaby.[1]

Background and etymology[edit]

Main article: Haltemprice Priory

Haltemprice Priory was established as an Augustinian religious dwelling in the 14th century. The name is thought to derive from the French Haute Emprise (High enterprise). The priory existed until the 16th century and the Dissolution of the Monasteries under Henry VIII.[2] Settlement continued at Haltemprice as 'Haltemprice Farm',[3] the farm was occupied up to 1998, as of 2011 the farm building is derelict.[4]

Parish[edit]

Haltemprice was historically an extra-parochial area, and was made a civil parish in its own right in 1858.[5] It was included in the Sculcoates Rural District under the Local Government Act 1894.

Urban district[edit]

In 1935, under a County Review Order, an urban district of Haltemprice was set up, to cover Hull's western suburbs. The Cottingham and Hessle urban districts were abolished and included into the new Haltemprice Urban District, as was part of the Sculcoates Rural District including the existing parish of Haltemprice and the parish of West Ella.[6]

In 1974, under the Local Government Act 1972, Haltemprice Urban District was merged to form part of the Beverley borough in Humberside, the northern half of which became the reconstituted East Riding in 1996. The former Haltemprice area has been since divided again into a number of civil parishes.

The area gives its name to the Parliamentary seat of Haltemprice and Howden which is held by the former Shadow Home Secretary David Davis and, as the fictional constituency of Haltemprice, was held by the fictional Tory MP Alan B'Stard in the ITV sitcom The New Statesman.

Kirk Ella[edit]

The traditional centre of the village is the area around St Andrew's Church, which is a Grade I listed building.

St Andrew's Church

Kirk Ella was served by the Willerby and Kirk Ella railway station on the Hull and Barnsley Railway between 1885 and 1955.

The village has a mini supermarket, newsagents, several hairdressers, florist and three pubs/bars. Kirk Ella is a main bus route as there are many bus stops, some of the local buses go into the nearby city of Hull.

Kirk Ella also has a primary school and is home to Wolfreton Upper School, with the Lower School site in Willerby, though this will change in September 2016 when the two sites merge into one due to the new school building, with the Upper School site expected to become housing. Wolfreton was rated a 'good' school by Ofsted in 2013.

Kirk Ella has a large green space ideal for dog walking or walking across which is opposite the Haltemprice Leisure Centre. Next to it there is the old railway line, the line is long gone but there is a good walk along it that ends up in the dog field from the end of the Willerby Square Car Park.

Kirk Ella has many listed buildings as the village is rather old.

The singer David Whitfield lived here in the 1960s.

West Ella Hall is a Grade II listed building and is owned by the local multi-millionaire Eddie Healey who owns the Meadowhall Shopping Centre in Sheffield.

West Ella[edit]

West Ella is together in a small parish with Kirk Ella. There are no shops but there is a war memorial and chapel. The village has many large houses, many with large gardens and swimming pools, which are often home to upper class residents. West Ella is situated 6 miles (10 km) west of the city of Kingston upon Hull, and on the east side of the A164 road. On the opposite west side of the A164 is the village and civil parish of Swanland.

Anlaby[edit]

The area is primarily residential, with industrial and commercial premises on Springfield Way. A new shopping development 'Anlaby Retail Park' opened in 2010, replacing late 20th century light industrial development; the new retail park is directly east of a large Morrison's supermarket (1993, rebuilt and expanded 2003) The Anlaby Retail Park is home to a Marks and Spencer supermarket, Pets At Home, Costa Coffee, Brantano Footwear, Next, Argos and Asda Living.

Anlaby Primary School is located on the eastern fringe of the village. Anlaby also has Haltemprice Leisure Centre which has swimming facilities and a gym. The village also has its own library and doctor's surgery.

Anlaby Common[edit]

In the 1850s Anlaby Common was enclosed land in open countryside to the east of the village of Anlaby. It is primarily residential but has a Trenton Cars garage, travel agents, mini supermarket ,dry cleaners/launderette and take-away. There is a school named "Eastfield School" in East Ella. Anlaby Common has 2 churches.

Lindsey Place, Anlaby Common, built c.1964 (2007)

There is a school named "Eastfield School" in East Ella. Anlaby Common has 2 churches. Anlaby Common also has a rugby club down Springhead Lane which is also home to door company "Summerbridge Doors", which old premises was near the Anlaby retail park on Springfield Way.

Willerby[edit]

Willerby has a mini supermarket, bistro/café bar, bank, many estate agents, take-away and a garage. Willerby has its own retail park named Willerby Shopping Park which is home to a Waitrose supermarket, Iceland, Pound Stretcher, B&M Bargains, Key Cutters and Sue Ryder charity shop. The village also houses Wolfreton School and Willerby Carr Lane Primary School. In 2013 Ofsted said that Wolfreton School was a "Good" school. There is a children's play park with a farm opposite that which sells flowers all year round. Nearby in the village there is the Willerby and Kirk Ella Cricket Club. Willerby also has its own public library and doctor's surgery.

Hessle[edit]

Hessle is a town which has many residential areas, shops including supermarkets, banks, charity shops and lots more. Hessle is home to the famous Humber Bridge which was opened in 1981 by the Queen. At the time of its opening, it was the world's largest single span suspension bridge. Hessle also has many good events which include the Farmer's Market which is held every first Sunday of the month in the Humber Bridge Car Park and Hessle Feast which is held every year during Whitsuntide. Hessle Feast is a time of enjoyment, when the people of the Parish would gather to celebrate the coming year.

Skidby[edit]

Skidby has a single main street, Main Street, running roughly east-west: the eastern end leads to Cottingham, making a crossroads with the former Hessle to Beverley turnpike before a roundabout junction with the A164 road. At the western end of the village Little Weighton Road leads roughly towards Little Weighton; to the south is Riplingham Road, also leading westward, currently (2006) a farm track and footpath

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Haltemprice Leisure Centre". Haltemprice Leisure Centre in Anlaby. Retrieved 19 April 2012. 
  2. ^ Hayton, Richard. "Haltemprice Priory". Archived from the original on 16 May 2011. 
  3. ^ Historic England. "Haltemprice Priory Farm (1103364)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 16 April 2012. 
  4. ^ Peter Gaze Pace (chartered architects) (September 2011), "Haltemprice Priory Farmhouse, Abbey Lane, Willerby, Hull HU10 6ER, Scheduled Ancient Monument SM 32639. Proposed re-instatement as a single domestic dwelling" (PDF), East Riding of Yorkshire Council 
  5. ^ "Relationships / unit history of Haltemprice CP/ExP". A Vision of Britain Through Time. Great Britain Historical GIS Project. Retrieved 24 July 2009. 
  6. ^ "Relationships / unit history of Haltemprice RD". A Vision of Britain Through Time. Great Britain Historical GIS Project. Retrieved 24 July 2009. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 53°45′50″N 0°26′20″W / 53.764°N 0.439°W / 53.764; -0.439