Hamblen County, Tennessee

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Hamblen County
Hamblen County Courthouse in Morristown
Official logo of Hamblen County
Motto(s): 
Service, Community, Industry
Map of Tennessee highlighting Hamblen County
Location within the U.S. state of Tennessee
Map of the United States highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°13′N 83°16′W / 36.22°N 83.27°W / 36.22; -83.27
Country United States
State Tennessee
Founded1870
Named forHezekiah Hamblen[1]
SeatMorristown
Largest cityMorristown
Government
 • MayorBill Brittain[2] (R)[3]
Area
 • Total176 sq mi (460 km2)
 • Land161 sq mi (420 km2)
 • Water15 sq mi (40 km2)  8.3%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total64,499 Increase
 • Density400.61/sq mi (154.68/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district1st
Websitewww.hamblencountytn.gov

Hamblen County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 census, the population was 64,499.[4] Its county seat and only incorporated city is Morristown.[5] Hamblen County is the core county of the Morristown Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Hamblen, Jefferson, and Grainger counties. The county and the Morristown MSA is included in the Knoxville-Morristown-Sevierville, TN Combined Statistical Area.[6]

History[edit]

Hamblen County was created in 1870 from parts of Jefferson, Grainger, and Hawkins counties. The county is named in honor of Hezekiah Hamblen (1775–1854),[1][7] an early settler, landowner, attorney, and member of the Hawkins County Court for many years. Governor Dewitt Clinton Senter, a resident of the county, used his influence to assist in its establishment.[8] The Hamblen County Courthouse was completed in 1874.

During World War I, Hamblen County was the only county in the United States to have two Medal of Honor recipients. Edward R. Talley and Calvin Ward both earned them while fighting on the Western Front.[9]

During World War II, the attack transport naval ship USS Hamblen was named after the county.

Historic sites[edit]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 176 square miles (460 km2), of which 161 square miles (420 km2) is land and 15 square miles (39 km2) (8.3%) is water.[10] It is the third-smallest county in Tennessee by land area and fourth-smallest by total area.

Adjacent counties[edit]

State protected areas[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Waterways[edit]

The main source of water on Hamblen County is the man-made Cherokee Lake. Cherokee Lake was created during WWII as part of the TVA hydroelectric project. The lake is fed by multiple sources, including a series of natural creeks and runoff waters. The lake begins with its first source at Poor Valley Creek in Hawkins County, extends through neighboring Grainger County and then Hamblen County. Cherokee Lake then ends with Cherokee Dam where the water is drained into the Holston River. In total, Cherokee Lake has 28,780 acres of surface area and extends for 400 miles of shoreline; though, only a portion of this resides in Hamblen County.[11]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
188010,187
189011,41812.1%
190012,72811.5%
191013,6507.2%
192015,05610.3%
193016,61610.4%
194018,61112.0%
195023,97628.8%
196033,09238.0%
197038,69616.9%
198049,30027.4%
199050,4802.4%
200058,12815.2%
201062,5447.6%
202064,4993.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]
1790-1960[13] 1900-1990[14]
1990-2000[15] 2010-2014[4]
Age pyramid Hamblen County, based on 2000 census data.

2020 census[edit]

Hamblen County racial composition[17]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 49,197 76.28%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 1,605 5.27%
Native American 130 0.2%
Asian 712 1.1%
Pacific Islander 268 0.42%
Other/Mixed 2,603 4.04%
Hispanic or Latino 9,483 14.7%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 64,499 people, 24,456 households, and 16,391 families residing in the county.

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[18] of 2010, there were 62,544 people, 29,693 households, and 17,161 families residing in the county. The population density was 388 people per square mile (138/km2). There were 24,560 housing units at an average density of 153 per square mile (59/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 91.74% White, 4.22% African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.70% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, and 1.42% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origins constituted 10.73% of the population.

There were 24,560 households, out of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.3% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.1% were non-families. 25.70% of all households were made up of individuals living alone, and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.30% under the age of 20, 5.7% from 20 to 24, 25.7% from 25 to 44, 26.7% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.6 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $39,807, and the median income for a family was $48,353. Males had a median income of $36,166 versus $27,094 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,162. 17.7% of the population and 13.2% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 15.7% are under the age of 65 and 19.3% are 65 or older.

Economy[edit]

Hamblen County's economic development in recent decades has been phenomenal. Several large industrial parks on the eastern, western, and southern parts of the county are home to manufacturing facilities for regionally, nationally, and internationally based corporations.[19]

Government[edit]

The Hamblen County government consists of twenty-six elected officials, twelve appointed officials, and the staffing and offices therein. In addition to these offices, the county also houses a liaison office with the University of Tennessee for its Agricultural Extension office.[20][21]

Elected Officials[edit]

  • County Mayor - Bill Brittain[22]
  • Sheriff - Esco Jarnigan[23]
  • Register of Deeds - Jim Clawson[24]
  • Circuit Court Clerk - Teresa West[25]
  • Trustee - Scotty Long[26]
  • Assessor of Property - Keith Ely[26]
  • Road Superintendent - Barry Poole[27]
  • County Clerk - Penny Petty[28]
  • General Sessions Judge Division 1 - Doug Collins[25]
  • General Sessions Judge Division 2 - Janice Snider[25]
  • Chancellor – 3rd Judicial District - Douglas Jenkins[29]
  • Criminal Court Judge - John Dugger[25]
  • County Commissioners (14 in total)[30]

Appointed Officials[edit]

  • Finance Director
  • Emergency Mgmt. Director
  • Cherokee Park Director
  • Director of Schools
  • Administrator of Elections
  • Clerk & Master
  • Juvenile Services Director
  • Veteran's Service Officer
  • Planning Director
  • Work Program Director
  • Human Resource Manager
  • Drug Court Director

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

  • Morristown (county seat, small portions in Jefferson)

Town[edit]

Census-designated place[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Public Education[edit]

The Hamblen County Department of Education has two high schools, four middle schools, eleven elementary/intermediate schools, and one alternative-placement school. The Tennessee Board of Regents also has a community college located in Morristown, as well as a technical college for vocational training. Hamblen County's department of education's current mission statement, as of the 2019–2020 school year, is, "The mission of Hamblen County Department of Education is to educate students so they can be challenged to successfully compete in their chosen fields."[31] The current superintendent of Hamblen County Schools is Dr. Jeff Perry.[32] As of the 2019–2020 school year, Hamblen County Department of Education has 10,424 students enrolled.[33]

Elementary schools[edit]

  • Alpha Elementary School
  • Fairview-Marguerite Elementary School
  • Hillcrest Elementary School
  • John Hay Elementary
  • Lincoln Heights Elementary School
  • Manley Elementary
  • Russellville Elementary School
  • Union Heights Elementary
  • West Elementary School
  • Whitesburg Elementary School
  • Witt Elementary School

Middle schools[edit]

  • East Ridge Middle School
  • Lincoln Heights Middle School
  • Meadowview Middle School
  • West View Middle School

High schools[edit]

Community College[edit]

Technical College[edit]

Alternative school[edit]

  • Miller Boyd Alternative School

Private Education[edit]

Lakeway Christian Schools[edit]

Lakeway Christian Schools is a private school system that contains three schools in Hamblen County. Cornerstone Christian Academy enrolls students from grades PreK through 5. Lakeway Christian Academy enrolls students from grades 6 through 12. Tri-Cities Cristian Academy enrolls students from grades 9 through 12.[34] The current mission state is, "Partnering with families to provide a Christ-centered and academically challenging education, equipping students with a biblical worldview and a heart for Christ, that they may grow in wisdom, stature and in favor with God and man."[35][36]

All Saints' Episcopal School[edit]

All Saints' Episcopal School was founded in 1967 as a preschool. In 1985, the school was expanded to include first grade. Since then, the school has further expanded (completion in 1992) to enroll students from PreK to 8th grade.[37]

Faith Christian Academy[edit]

Faith Christian Academy enrolls students from grades 1 through 12.[38]

Morristown Covenant Academy[edit]

Morristown Covenant Academy was founded in 1985 and enrolls students in grades Kindergarten through 12. In their high school educational program, students can choose an educational path for general education, college/university readiness, or vocational readiness.[39] The Morristown Covenant Academy also houses a day care and pre-k program.[40]

Politics[edit]

Like almost all of East Tennessee, Hamblen County has long voted overwhelmingly Republican, starting with its powerful Unionist sentiment during the Civil War. The last Democratic candidate to carry the county was Jimmy Carter in 1976.

United States presidential election results for Hamblen County, Tennessee[41]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 18,811 76.37% 5,500 22.33% 320 1.30%
2016 15,857 76.63% 4,075 19.69% 760 3.67%
2012 14,522 72.49% 5,234 26.13% 276 1.38%
2008 15,508 68.41% 6,807 30.03% 354 1.56%
2004 14,742 66.05% 7,433 33.30% 143 0.64%
2000 11,824 60.02% 7,564 38.40% 311 1.58%
1996 9,797 54.13% 7,006 38.71% 1,296 7.16%
1992 8,898 49.84% 7,114 39.85% 1,842 10.32%
1988 10,418 66.93% 5,061 32.52% 86 0.55%
1984 11,144 68.97% 4,922 30.46% 92 0.57%
1980 9,741 60.60% 5,890 36.65% 442 2.75%
1976 6,989 47.78% 7,504 51.30% 135 0.92%
1972 8,879 76.39% 2,563 22.05% 182 1.57%
1968 6,382 57.86% 2,390 21.67% 2,259 20.48%
1964 5,196 53.00% 4,607 47.00% 0 0.00%
1960 7,093 69.23% 3,122 30.47% 30 0.29%
1956 5,608 67.77% 2,592 31.32% 75 0.91%
1952 5,031 67.19% 2,395 31.98% 62 0.83%
1948 2,116 53.80% 1,552 39.46% 265 6.74%
1944 2,001 53.73% 1,723 46.27% 0 0.00%
1940 1,794 46.27% 2,055 53.00% 28 0.72%
1936 2,261 48.12% 2,438 51.88% 0 0.00%
1932 1,458 41.40% 2,032 57.69% 32 0.91%
1928 1,902 60.09% 1,263 39.91% 0 0.00%
1924 1,342 49.48% 1,317 48.56% 53 1.95%
1920 1,571 53.86% 1,301 44.60% 45 1.54%
1916 795 50.73% 741 47.29% 31 1.98%
1912 427 28.62% 722 48.39% 343 22.99%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Mrs. Burwin Haun, "Hamblen County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: 16 October 2013.
  2. ^ "Hamblen". County Technical Assistance Service. University of Tennessee. Retrieved September 11, 2020.
  3. ^ "Re-elect Bill Brittain". Bill Brittain for County Mayor.
  4. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved December 2, 2013.
  5. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  6. ^ "Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas" (PDF). Office of Management and Budget. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved April 27, 2014 – via National Archives.
  7. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. pp. 147.
  8. ^ "Hamblen's History," Morristown Citizen Tribune, 12 September 2012. Retrieved: 16 October 2013.
  9. ^ Claborn, Jim (March 25, 2017). "Back When". CitizenTribune.com. Retrieved November 19, 2018.
  10. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  11. ^ "Cherokee Lake".
  12. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  14. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  16. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved July 20, 2019.
  17. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 26, 2021.
  18. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  19. ^ "Hamblen County".
  20. ^ hostmethod. "Elected Officials/Department Heads Directory". Hamblen County Government. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  21. ^ hostmethod. "County Commission". Hamblen County Government. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  22. ^ "Mayor". Hamblen County Government.
  23. ^ "Sheriff's Department And Jail". Hamblen County Government.
  24. ^ "Register of Deeds". Hamblen County Government.
  25. ^ a b c d "Circuit, Criminal, Juvenile and General Sessions Court". Hamblen County Government.
  26. ^ a b "Trustee". Hamblen County Government.
  27. ^ "Highway & Garbage Departments". Hamblen County Government.
  28. ^ "Hamblen County Clerk – Tennessee".
  29. ^ "Loading..." www.hamblencountychancery.org.
  30. ^ "County Commission". Hamblen County Government.
  31. ^ "About". www.hcboe.net. Retrieved February 8, 2020.
  32. ^ "Welcome to the Hamblen County Board of Education Website". hamblencounty.schoolinsites.com. Retrieved February 8, 2020.
  33. ^ "Explore Hamblen County School District". Niche. Retrieved February 8, 2020.
  34. ^ "About - Cornerstone and Lakeway Academy". www.lcstn.org. Retrieved February 8, 2020.
  35. ^ "Mission and Vision - Cornerstone and Lakeway Academy". www.lcstn.org. Retrieved February 8, 2020.
  36. ^ "Home | Tri-Cities Christian Academy | Lakeway Christian Schools".
  37. ^ "History". All Saints' School. Retrieved February 8, 2020.
  38. ^ "Academy Info". FAITH CHURCH AND ACADEMY. Retrieved February 8, 2020.
  39. ^ "About – Morristown Covenant Academy". Retrieved February 8, 2020.
  40. ^ "ELC – Morristown Covenant Academy". Retrieved February 8, 2020.
  41. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 10, 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°13′N 83°16′W / 36.22°N 83.27°W / 36.22; -83.27