Hamburg steak

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Hamburg steak
Hamburg steak.jpg
A Hamburg steak
Place of origin Germany
Main ingredients beefsteak
Cookbook: Hamburg steak  Media: Hamburg steak

Hamburg steak is beefsteak that is shaped into a patty to be cooked after being chopped. It is closely similar to the Salisbury steak. Made popular worldwide by migrating Germans, it became a mainstream dish in around the start of the nineteenth century.

History[edit]

Hamburg, Germany, where Hamburg steak was allegedly invented

In the early eighteenth century, Hamburg steak was already popular mostly among the Germans, who are claimed to have invented it.[1] One tale has it that the beef in Hamburg, a German port, was known for being minced and chopped – a method borrowed from the Russians by the German butchers.[1] Another one states that Hamburg steak is an English creation; it is mentioned in the 1745 cookbook Art of Cookery by Hannah Glasse.[1] Migrating Germans introduced the dish worldwide and Hamburg steak became a mainstream dish in nineteenth-century America.[1] The first printed menu in the United States listed Hamburg steak as one of the food items offered; at ten cents, it was the most expensive item on the list.[2] After being wedged between two pieces of bread, the steak evolved into the hamburger.[3]

There is a distinction between the terms Hamburg steak and hamburger: The former refers to just a beef patty made a certain way, while the hamburger is a sandwich-like dish comprising the patty, buns and other ingredients including onions.[1]

Preparation[edit]

Hamburg beefsteak is made from ground beef or other cheap beef parts.[4] After being chopped, minced, and scraped into a patty, the beefsteak is cooked, either by roasting, frying, or smoking.[5] Eggs, bread, or onions, are sometimes combined with the beef. Mixing milk with the dish[clarification needed] is believed to enhance its quality.[4] Hamburg steak is usually seasoned. The steak may also be consumed raw.[6]

Haute cuisine[edit]

Hamburg steak is listed by Escoffier as a classic dish in haute cuisine.[7]

See also[edit]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e McWilliams 2012, p. 122.
  2. ^ Murphy, Jane (2010). The Great Big Burger Book: 100 New and Classic Recipes for Mouth Watering Burgers Every Day Every Way: Easyread Large Edition. ReadHowYouWant. p. 2. ISBN 9781458764638. 
  3. ^ Urbans, Dennis (2005). God Wants You Healthy!. Xulon Press. p. 120. ISBN 9781597814638. 
  4. ^ a b Hunt, Caroline Louisa (1910). Economical use of meat in the home. Department of Agriculture (United States). pp. 33–. 
  5. ^ Blumenthal, Heston (2010). In Search of Total Perfection. Bloomsbury. pp. 195–. ISBN 9781408802441. 
  6. ^ Francis, Charles (2009). Wisdom Well Said. Levine Mesa Press. pp. 166–. ISBN 9780982388709. 
  7. ^ Le Guide Culinaire by Auguste Escoffier, 1903

Bibliography[edit]