Hamdog

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Hamdog
Place of origin Australia
Region or state Western Australia
Created by Mark Anthony Murray
Main ingredients Hot dog, beef patty
Variations chili, cheese, onions, egg, potatoes, hoagie roll
Food energy
(per serving)
623 (315 from fat)[1] kcal
Other information fat 35 g[1]
Cookbook: Hamdog  Media: Hamdog

A hamdog is an Australian sandwich that consists of a shaped bread bun with a beef patty cut in two, and a frankfurter placed in between the two halves which is then topped off with cheese, pickles, sauces, tomato, lettuce and onion. The specially shaped bun was invented by Australian Mark Anthony Murray in February 2004 who was later granted a US patent.

History[edit]

One kind of hamdog was conceived by Australian Mark Murray in 2004. His version contains a beef patty cut in two, with a frankfurter placed in between the two patties, then topped off with cheese, pickles, sauces, tomato, lettuce and onion. He received a US patent for the specially shaped bun in 2009.[2]

Another variety of hamdog was invented in February 2005 by Chandler Goff, the owner of a bar in Decatur, Georgia. This version consists of a hot dog wrapped in a half pound of hamburger with bacon, cheese and onion on a hoagie bun which is deep-fried and served with a fried egg on top and a side of French fries.[3] He started selling it at the Indiana State Fair in 2006.[4] A hamdog eating contest was established in Vadnais Heights, Minnesota, in 2007 by Jimmy's Food and Drink. There is no reward for the winner other than bragging rights.[5] A hamdog eating contest was established in 2007. Dr. Nicholas Lang, professor of surgery at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, advised against consuming a hamdog, even as a one-time snack.[6]

Reception[edit]

David Harsanyi mentioned the hamdog in his manifesto against the nanny state, Nanny State: How Food Fascists, Teetotaling Do-Gooders, Priggish Moralists, and other Boneheaded Bureaucrats are Turning America into a Nation of Children. He claimed a group of activists, whom he called "Twinkie Fascists", were trying to prevent him from eating the meal. While some people might not enjoy it as much as he did, that was the beauty of being a free citizen. Harsanyi described the hamdog as "perfect", "greasy", and "scrumptious", but mentioned he could only finish half. That was his body exhibiting self control, "two concepts that nannies, it seems, can't wrap their minds around."[7]

Health concerns[edit]

Goff told the Associated Press that his restaurant served more healthy alternatives, like salads and sandwiches that were not deep-fried. Dr. Nicholas Lang, professor of surgery at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, advised against ever consuming a hamdog at any point in one's lifetime. "If you choke that down, you might as well find a heart surgeon because you are going to need one," he added.[6]

The approximate caloric intake for a hamdog is 623, including 315 calories from fat. The total fat in a hamdog is 35 grams, roughly 54% of an average person's daily value. These statistics were listed by The Advocate in a 2005 article.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Harsanyi, David (2007). Nanny State: How Food Fascists, Teetotaling Do-Gooders, Priggish Moralists, and other Boneheaded Bureaucrats are Turning America into a Nation of Children. New York, New York: Broadway Books. ISBN 978-0-7679-2432-0. OCLC 105450624.