Hamilton Township, Mercer County, New Jersey

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Hamilton Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Hamilton
Sayen Park Botanical Garden
Motto(s): America's Favorite Hometown[1]
Location in Mercer County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Mercer County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hamilton Township, Mercer County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hamilton Township, Mercer County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°12′25″N 74°40′28″W / 40.20704°N 74.674431°W / 40.20704; -74.674431Coordinates: 40°12′25″N 74°40′28″W / 40.20704°N 74.674431°W / 40.20704; -74.674431[2][3]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Mercer
Incorporated April 11, 1842
Named for Hamilton Square / Alexander Hamilton
Government[8]
 • Type Faulkner Act Mayor-Council
 • Body Township Council
 • Mayor Kelly Yaede (R, term ends December 31, 2019)[4][5]
 • Administrator John Ricci[6]
 • Municipal clerk Eileen A. Gore[7]
Area[2]
 • Total 104.602 km2 (40.387 sq mi)
 • Land 102.277 km2 (39.489 sq mi)
 • Water 2.325 km2 (0.898 sq mi)  2.22%
Area rank 55th of 565 in state
2nd of 12 in county[2]
Elevation[9] 30 m (98 ft)
Population (2010 Census)[10][11][12]
 • Total 88,464
 • Estimate (2016)[13] 88,400
 • Rank 9th of 565 in state
1st of 12 in county[14]
 • Density 864.9/km2 (2,240.2/sq mi)
 • Density rank 271nd of 565 in state
6th of 12 in county[14]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08609–08611, 08619, 08620, 08629, 08650, 08690, 08691[15][16]
Area code(s) 609 and 640[17]
FIPS code 3402129310[2][18][19]
GNIS feature ID 0882127[2][2][20]
Website www.hamiltonnj.com

Hamilton Township is a township in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. The township is within the New York metropolitan area as defined by the United States Census Bureau,[21] but directly borders the Philadelphia metropolitan area and is part of the Federal Communications Commission's Philadelphia Designated Market Area.[22] As of the 2010 United States Census, the township had a total population of 88,464,[10][11][12] reflecting an increase of 1,355 (+1.6%) from the 87,109 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 556 (+0.6%) from the 86,553 counted in the 1990 Census.[23] The township was the state's 9th-largest municipality, after having been ranked 10th in 2000.[24] The township is located immediately east of the city of Trenton, the state's capital.

Hamilton was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 11, 1842, from portions of the now-defunct Nottingham Township. Portions of the township were taken to form Chambersburg borough (April 1, 1872, annexed by Trenton in 1888) and Wilbur borough (April 24, 1891, annexed by Trenton in 1898).[25] Hamilton Township derives its name from the village of Hamilton Square, which might have been named for Alexander Hamilton.[26][27]

In 2006, Hamilton Township was ranked by Morgan Quitno as the eighteenth-safest city in the United States, out of 369 cities nationwide.[28] In the company's 2005 survey, the Township was ranked 15th safest of 354 cities surveyed nationwide.[29]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 40.387 square miles (104.602 km2), including 39.489 square miles (102.277 km2) of it is land and 0.898 square miles (2.325 km2) of water (2.22%) is water.[2][3]

Although Hamilton is one of the largest townships in New Jersey it doesn't have a true "downtown", but a number of settlements within the township form smaller commercial centers. Groveville (with a 2010 Census population of 2,945[30]), Hamilton Square (12,784[31]), Mercerville (13,230[32]), White Horse (9,494[33]) and Yardville (7,186[34]) are all census-designated places and unincorporated communities located within the township.[35]

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Briar Manor,[citation needed] Broad Street Park, Bromley, Chewalla Park,[citation needed] Creston, DeCou Village, Deutzville, Duck Island, East Trenton Heights,[citation needed] Edgebrook, Extonville, Golden Crest,[citation needed] Gropps Lake, Haines Corner, Hutchinson Mills, Lakeside Park, Maple Shade, North Crosswicks, Nottingham,[citation needed] Oil City, Pond Run, Quaker Bridge, Quaker Gardens,[citation needed] Rosemont,[citation needed] The Orchards,[citation needed] Trenton Gardens,[citation needed] Warner Village,[citation needed] White City and Yardville Heights.[36]

Van Nest Wildlife Refuge is a 98-acre (40 ha) wildlife management area operated by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Fish and Wildlife.[37][38]

As of late 2005, much of the new residential development in Hamilton has been geared to accommodating the aging baby boomer generation. New retirement communities and assisted-living facilities outpace that of new traditional residential communities. Such construction has been spurred by several factors. The first being that the public is skeptical of growing school budgets due to its already large size. Hamilton voters have often rejected increases in school budgets in their yearly elections to keep already high taxes from growing higher. As a result, the planning board has been reluctant to authorize construction of housing that will increase the student population. Another reason is a series of improvements to Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital. The hospital is now a highly respected source of care in the state. It is situated next to where most of the under-developed land in the township used to be, land that is now home to the active older-adult communities.

As of October 2016, significant construction has been done to further build up the Hamilton Township area. Multiple new retirement communities have been constructed, as well as multiple new restaurants, banks, gas stations and convenience stores along Route 33. Hamilton Township continues to expand rapidly to accommodate the increase in citizens residing in the community.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18101,747
18201,710−2.1%
18301,90311.3%
18502,807
18603,77334.4%
18705,41743.6%
18803,370*−37.8%
18904,16323.5%
19004,164*0.0%
19107,89989.7%
192014,58084.6%
193027,12186.0%
194030,21911.4%
195041,15636.2%
196065,03558.0%
197079,60922.4%
198082,8014.0%
199086,5534.5%
200087,1090.6%
201088,4641.6%
Est. 201688,400[13][39]−0.1%
Population sources:
1850-1920[40] 1850-1870[41]
1850[42] 1870[43] 1880-1890[44]
1890-1910[45] 1910-1930[46]
1930-1990[47] 2000[48][49] 2010[10][11][12]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[25]

2010 Census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 88,464 people, 34,534 households, and 23,759 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,240.2 per square mile (864.9/km2). There were 36,170 housing units at an average density of 915.9 per square mile (353.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 78.38% (69,340) White, 11.78% (10,419) Black or African American, 0.17% (149) Native American, 3.29% (2,914) Asian, 0.09% (79) Pacific Islander, 4.27% (3,775) from other races, and 2.02% (1,788) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.87% (9,613) of the population.[10]

There were 34,534 households out of which 28.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.3% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.2% were non-families. 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.09.[10]

In the township, the population was spread out with 21.2% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 25.3% from 25 to 44, 29.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.8 years. For every 100 females there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 88.6 males.[10]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $72,026 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,663) and the median family income was $87,512 (+/- $2,631). Males had a median income of $58,674 (+/- $3,519) versus $45,661 (+/- $1,733) for females. The per capita income for the township was $32,344 (+/- $701). About 3.5% of families and 5.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.3% of those under age 18 and 3.3% of those age 65 or over.[50]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[18] there were 87,109 people, 33,523 households, and 23,667 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,208.0 people per square mile (852.5/km²). There were 34,535 housing units at an average density of 875.4 per square mile (338.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 85.15% White, 8.16% African American, 0.14% Native American, 2.56% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 2.19% from other races, and 1.76% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.13% of the population.[48][49]

There were 33,523 households out of which 31.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.3% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.4% were non-families. 24.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.10.[48][49]

In the township the population was spread out with 23.2% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 29.9% from 25 to 44, 24.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.0 males.[48][49]

The median income for a household in the township was $57,110, and the median income for a family was $66,986. Males had a median income of $46,360 versus $33,673 for females. The per capita income for the township was $25,441. About 2.8% of families and 4.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.4% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over.[48][49]

Parks and recreation[edit]

Hamilton hosts one of the largest recreational parks in the state, and borders another. The municipal Veterans Park is 350 acres (1.4 km2) and is housed entirely in the township. Mercer County Park borders the township to the North and encompasses 2,500 acres (10 km2) of land that was shared from Hamilton Township along with neighboring Lawrence Township and West Windsor Township.[51] This park contains Mercer Lake, one of the largest man-made lakes in the state, which was built as a result of a federal flood control project to prevent flooding in Trenton along Assunpink Creek, with gravel removed to deepen the lake basin used as part of the construction of Interstates 95 and 195.[52]

on the Grounds For Sculpture, located in Hamilton, New Jersey

The Grounds for Sculpture is a 42-acre (170,000 m2) sculpture park which houses more than 270 sculptures, gardens, water features, and other nature scenes. The organization's mission is to promote the appreciation of arts and sculpture.[53]

Sayen Park Botanical Garden is named after Fredrick Sayen because it was originally his land and his home.[54]

George Washington used Quakerbridge Road on his famous night march from the Second Battle of Trenton on his way to the Battle of Princeton.

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Hamilton Township is governed within the Faulkner Act, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law, under the Mayor-Council plan E system of New Jersey municipal government, as implemented on January 1, 1976, based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission.[55] The township's government consists of a mayor and a five-member township council, with all elected representatives serving four-year terms of office. Elections alternate in a four-year cycle, with the mayor and two township council members up for election and then the three other township council seats coming up to vote two years later.[8] At an annual reorganization meeting, the council selects a president and vice president from among its members for a one-year term.[56]

Mayors of Hamilton Township, Mercer County
# Mayor Term Party
1 John K. "Jack" Rafferty 1976–2000 Republican
2 Glen Gilmore 2000–08 Democratic
3 John Bencivengo 2008–12 Republican
Kevin Meara (acting) 2012 Republican
4 Kelly Yaede[4] 2012– Republican

As of 2018, the Mayor of Hamilton Township is Republican Kelly A. Yaede, serving a term of office that ends December 31, 2019.[4] Members of the Township Council are Council President Anthony P. Carabelli Jr. (D, 2021), Council Vice President Jeffrey Martin (D, 2021), Ralph Mastrangelo (R, 2019), Ileana Schirmer (R, 2019) and Richard Tighe (D, 2021).[57][58][59][60][61][62]

2012 Mayoral resignation[edit]

On April 27, 2012, Mayor John Bencivengo was charged by the U.S. Attorney's office for corruption in the extortion of payments in exchange for influencing the awarding of a health insurance contract for the Township's Board of Education.[63] On June 22, 2012 he was indicted by a federal grand jury on five criminal counts including extortion, attempted extortion, money laundering and two counts related to the federal travel act.[64]

On June 29, 2012, Rob Warney, a former Hamilton Township Director in Mayor John Bencivengo's cabinet, pleaded guilty before US District Court Judge Peter Sheridan to laundering money related to the federal bribery indictment against Mayor Bencivengo. Warney also admitted to accepting a bribe in 2006 in exchange for his vote and influence over a health insurance broker's contract.[65]

On November 19, 2012, Bencivengo was found guilty on all counts of corruption, extortion and bribery. He submitted his resignation effective November 21, 2012.[66]

On March 24, 2013, Bencivengo was sentenced to a 38-month prison term, and is currently serving his sentence at a minimum security federal prison at Lewisburg Federal Penitentiary in Lewisburg, PA. On September 23, 2013, his attorney filed an appeal with the Third Circuit Court of Appeals.[67]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hamilton Township is located in the 4th Congressional District[68] and is part of New Jersey's 14th state legislative district.[11][69][70]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[71] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[72] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, 2019).[73][74]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 14th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Linda R. Greenstein (D, Plainsboro Township) and in the General Assembly by Daniel R. Benson (D, Hamilton Township, Mercer County) and Wayne DeAngelo (D, Hamilton Township, Mercer County).[75][76] The Governor of New Jersey is Phil Murphy (D, Middletown Township).[77] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Sheila Oliver (D, East Orange).[78]

Mercer County is governed by a County Executive who oversees the day-to-day operations of the county and by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders that acts in a legislative capacity, setting policy. All officials are chosen at-large in partisan elections, with the executive serving a four-year term of office while the freeholders serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year.[79] As of 2014, the County Executive is Brian M. Hughes (D, term ends December 31, 2015; Princeton).[80] Mercer County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chair Andrew Koontz (D, 2016; Princeton),[81] Freeholder Vice Chair Samuel T. Frisby, Sr. (2015; Trenton),[82] Ann M. Cannon (2015; East Windsor Township),[83] Anthony P. Carabelli (2016; Trenton),[84] John A. Cimino (2014, Hamilton Township),[85] Pasquale "Pat" Colavita, Jr. (2015; Lawrence Township)[86] and Lucylle R. S. Walter (2014; Ewing Township)[87][88][89] Mercer County's constitutional officers are County Clerk Paula Sollami-Covello (D, 2015),[90] Sheriff John A. Kemler (D, 2014)[91] and Surrogate Diane Gerofsky (D, 2016).[92][93]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 56,202 registered voters in Hamilton Township, of which 18,266 (32.5%) were registered as Democrats, 10,402 (18.5%) were registered as Republicans and 27,508 (48.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 26 voters registered to other parties.[94]

Presidential Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016[95] 45.5% 19,396 50.7% 21,608 3.8% 1,633
2012[96] 41.7% 17,114 57.1% 23,434 1.2% 510
2008[97] 43.9% 19,422 53.5% 23,658 1.5% 679
2004[98] 48.5% 20,637 49.0% 20,874 0.7% 376

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 57.1% of the vote (23,434 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 41.7% (17,114 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (510 votes), among the 44,558 ballots cast by the township's 58,973 registered voters (3,500 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 75.6%.[99] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 53.5% of the vote here (23,658 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 43.9% (19,422 votes) and other candidates with 1.5% (679 votes), among the 44,201 ballots cast by the township's 58,979 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.9%. In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 49.0% of the vote here (20,874 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 48.5% (20,637 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (376 votes), among the 42,561 ballots cast by the township's 56,332 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 75.6.

Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2017[100] 46.6% 11,996 51.2% 13,180 2.3% 590
2013[101] 62.0% 17,434 36.3% 10,217 1.7% 478
2009[102] 47.4% 14,234 45.0% 13,490 6.5% 1,953
2005[103] 48.5% 14,235 47.6% 13,990 3.9% 1,154

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 62.0% of the vote (17,434 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 36.3% (10,217 votes), and other candidates with 1.7% (478 votes), among the 29,111 ballots cast by the township's 57,809 registered voters (982 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 50.4%.[104] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 47.4% of the vote here (14,234 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 45.0% (13,490 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.4% (1,629 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (324 votes), among the 29,999 ballots cast by the township's 57,543 registered voters, yielding a 52.1% turnout.

Education[edit]

The Hamilton Township School District serve students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its 23 schools had an enrollment of 12,317 students and 975.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.6:1.[105] The district consists of seventeen elementary schools, three middle schools and three high schools along with an alternative program. Schools in the district (with 2014-15 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[106]) are Alexander Elementary School[107] (318 students; in grades K-5), Greenwood Elementary School[108] (238; K-5), Kisthardt Elementary School[109] (230; PreK-5), Klockner Elementary School[110] (240; PreK-5), Kuser Elementary School[111] (394; PreK-5), Lalor Elementary School[112] (234; K-5), Langtree Elementary School[113] (353; PreK-5), McGalliard Elementary School[114] (266; K-5), Mercerville Elementary School[115] (336; K-5), Morgan Elementary School[116] (315; K-5), Robinson Elementary School[117] (346; K-5), Sayen Elementary School[118] (258; K-5), Sunnybrae Elementary School[119] (319; K-5), University Heights Elementary School[120] (325; PreK-5), George E. Wilson Elementary School[121] (408; PreK-5), Yardville Elementary School[122] (287; K-5), Yardville Heights Elementary School[123] (252; K-5), Richard C. Crockett Middle School[124] (800; 6-8), Albert E. Grice Middle School[125] (868; 6-8), Emily C. Reynolds Middle School[126] (1,008; 6-8), Nottingham High School (North)[127] (1,366; 9-12), Hamilton High School (West / Watson)[128] (1,228; 9-12), Steinert High School (East)[129] (1,272; 9-12) and Hamilton Educational Program (HEP) High School.[130][131][132]

Pace Charter School of Hamilton is a charter school serving students in Kindergarten through fifth grade, operating under a charter granted by the New Jersey Department of Education.[133] The school was one of 11 in the state to be recognized in 2014 by the United States Department of Education's National Blue Ribbon Schools Program.[134][135][136]

St. Gregory the Great Academy is a Catholic school serving students in preschool through eighth grade that operates under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton.[137][138] The school was also recognized in 2014 by the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program.[134][135][139]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The New Jersey Turnpike (I-95) is the largest and busiest highway in Hamilton, though it has no interchanges within the township

Situated next to the New Jersey state capital of Trenton, and New Jersey's eighth-largest municipality, Hamilton Township is 65 miles (105 km) away from New York City and 35 miles (56 km) away from Philadelphia. Hamilton is also close to most points along the Jersey Shore. By car, Hamilton is about 80 minutes from New York City and 50 minutes from Philadelphia. The train ride to New York is slightly shorter than the drive into New York while the train ride to Philadelphia is slightly longer than the drive into Philadelphia. With nearly 90,000 residents and 40 square miles (100 km2) of land, it offers modern train station and major roads passing through.

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 369.10 miles (594.01 km) of roadways, of which 304.98 miles (490.82 km) were maintained by the municipality, 33.49 miles (53.90 km) by Mercer County and 27.93 miles (44.95 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 2.70 miles (4.35 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[140]

Roads include the New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95), Interstate 295, Interstate 195, U.S. Route 130, U.S. Route 206 and Route 33. Hamilton is the only municipality in the state that hosts Interstate 95 and both of its auxiliary routes, Interstates 195 and 295.

View north along Interstate 295 from South Broad Street. Interstate 295 is the largest highway in Hamilton Township directly accessible within the township.

Major county routes that traverse through include CR 524, CR 533 and CR 535.

The Turnpike's Woodrow Wilson service area is located between Interchanges 7 and 7A northbound at milepost 58.7.[141] The Richard Stockton service area is located between Interchanges 7A and 7 southbound at milepost 58.7.[142] No turnpike interchange is located in the township, but the closest exit is at Interchange 7A along I-195 in neighboring Robbinsville Township.

The New Jersey Turnpike Authority widened the turnpike between Exit 6 in Mansfield Township, Burlington County and Exit 8A in Monroe Township, Middlesex County. Two new carriageways were built to accommodate the outer roadway (or truck lanes). In Hamilton, new sound barriers and overpasses were built, as well as new entrance & exit ramps to the service areas. The project was announced in December 2004 and completed in early November 2014.[143]

Public transportation[edit]

Hamilton, NJ station

With the addition of the modern Hamilton train station located on Sloan Avenue just off I-295 at Exit 65B, the township has attracted more New York City-based commuters to the area.[144] The station offers service on NJ Transit's Northeast Corridor Line to New York Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan and to Trenton station where there is a SEPTA Trenton Line Regional Rail service to and from Philadelphia.[145]

NJ Transit provides public bus service between the township and Philadelphia on the 409 route and to Trenton on the 601, 603, 606, 607, 608 and 609 routes.[146]

OurBus offers intercity bus service from Hamilton to Washington, D.C.[citation needed]

In the news[edit]

  • The Megan Kanka case, for whom Megan's Law was named, occurred in Hamilton Township.[147]
  • Some letters involved in the 2001 anthrax attacks were processed through the United States Postal Service Regional Mail Facility in Hamilton Township. The building was closed for more than four years while it was decontaminated at a cost of $65 million, but an improvised post office was made from tents and canopies in the building's vicinity.[148]
  • The annual Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree chosen for 2008 was grown in Hamilton. It was a 77-year-old Norway Spruce weighing 8 tons and rising 72 feet (22 m) that was located off the side of Klockner Road at the Tree King Tree Mart.[149]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Hamilton Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Quality of Life, Hamilton Township. Accessed July 11, 2016. "'America's Favorite Hometown' enjoys a deep-rooted history dating back to 1686, when our community was organized as the Town of Nottingham."
  2. ^ a b c d e f g 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  3. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c Office of the Mayor, Hamilton Township. Accessed July 11, 2016.
  5. ^ 2017 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 30, 2017.
  6. ^ Department of Administration, Hamilton Township, New Jersey. Accessed July 11, 2016.
  7. ^ Office of the Municipal Clerk, Hamilton Township, New Jersey. Accessed July 11, 2016.
  8. ^ a b 2013 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2012, p. 70.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Hamilton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hamilton township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  11. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  12. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hamilton township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  13. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016 - 2016 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  14. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hamilton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed March 17, 2011.
  16. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 2, 2013.
  17. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Hamilton, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 2, 2013.
  18. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  20. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  21. ^ New York-Newark, NY-NJ-CT-PA Combined Statistical Area, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 28, 2014.
  22. ^ - Philadelphia Market Area Coverage Maps, Federal Communications Commission. Accessed December 28, 2014.
  23. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  24. ^ The Counties and Most Populous Cities and Townships in 2010 in New Jersey: 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 28, 2017.
  25. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 162. Accessed March 17, 2012.
  26. ^ History of Hamilton Township, Hamilton Township Historical Society, 1999
  27. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 31, 2015.
  28. ^ Morgan Quitno 12th Annual Safest (and Most Dangerous) Cities: Top and Bottom 25 Cities Overall, Morgan Quitno. Accessed October 28, 2017.
  29. ^ Morgan Quitno 11th Annual Safest (and Most Dangerous) Cities: Top and Bottom 25 Cities Overall Archived 2011-12-25 at the Wayback Machine., accessed June 4, 2006.
  30. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Groveville CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  31. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Hamilton Square CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  32. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Mercerville CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  33. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for White Horse CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
  34. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Yardville CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 19, 2012.
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  137. ^ About Us, Saint Gregory the Great Academy. Accessed December 31, 2014.
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  140. ^ Mercer County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  141. ^ New Jersey Turnpike: Woodrow Wilson Service Area Archived 2006-01-17 at the Wayback Machine., New Jersey Turnpike. Accessed May 31, 2006.
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  144. ^ Hamilton station, NJ Transit. Accessed September 7, 2014.
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  146. ^ Mercer County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed March 17, 2012.
  147. ^ Pristin, Terry. "Trial to Begin in Girl's Killing", The New York Times, January 2, 1997. Accessed March 17, 2012. "More than two years after 7-year-old Megan Kanka was abducted from her Hamilton Township home and raped and killed, the trial of the man accused of killing her is about to begin."
  148. ^ Duffy, Erin. "Hamilton marks 10 year anniversary of anthrax attacks", The Times (Trenton), October 19, 2011. Accessed April 30, 2012. "By Oct. 18, 2001, the Route 130 facility was closed after anthrax spores were found inside and a handful of workers were confirmed to have cases of both inhalational and skin anthrax. Nearly 1,000 workers were treated for potential exposure, and the Hamilton facility remained closed for nearly five years, subject to dozens of tests and a $65 million cleanup."
  149. ^ Jaccarino, Mike; and Melago, Carrie. "Planted with love: Rockefeller Center finds its Christmas tree in Hamilton, New Jersey", New York Daily News, November 13, 2008. Accessed April 30, 2012. "Though Kremper and her husband, Joseph Varanyak, aren't alive to enjoy the fanfare, their sons beamed Thursday, when the 72-foot-high tree was cut down from their Hamilton, N.J., front yard."
  150. ^ Barone, Michael. "The education of a judge", Townhall, January 6, 2006. Accessed June 18, 2017. "In his opening statement to the Judiciary Committee, Judge Samuel Alito told the senators where he comes from. First, Hamilton Township, N.J., the modest-income suburb of Trenton, where he grew up."
  151. ^ via Associated Press. "Hamilton's Bill Baroni tapped for Port Authority job", The Trentonian, February 19, 2010. Accessed February 22, 2011.
  152. ^ Assemblyman Daniel R. Benson, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed April 30, 2012.
  153. ^ Angermiller, Michelle Amabile. "Songwriter Erin Bowman Talks Oscars Sync, Performing on Good Morning America & More", Billboard (magazine), February 26, 2017. Accessed October 2, 2017. "It will be a huge moment for the Hamilton, N.J., native -- and she can’t wait to watch.... This victory has been a long time coming since Bowman graduated Steinert High School in 2008 and headed off to New York City to pursue her musical dreams."
  154. ^ Bracy, Aaron. "Hamilton native vents after being cut by Sixers", The Trentonian, July 6, 2007. Accessed May 21, 2017. "Hamilton native Christian Burns came up short in his bid to make the 76ers' summer league team."
  155. ^ Mehlman, Peter. "Brestowski, Corcoran Nail Down Titles in Darts", The Washington Post, January 15, 1979. Accessed January 17, 2018. "Brestowski, from Hazleton, Pa., defeated 1975 champion Conrad Daniels in three legs to win the title before 800 spectators in his first U.S. Open competition.... Daniels, of Hamilton Square, N.J., thoroughly emotionless throughout the finals and semifinals, and was similarly stolid after the champion-ship match, accepting his loss with a mildly disappointed shrug."
  156. ^ Assemblyman Wayne P. DeAngelo, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed April 30, 2012.
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  159. ^ Colin Ferrell Archived 2008-09-19 at the Wayback Machine., Indianapolis Colts. Accessed August 11, 2008.
  160. ^ Franklin, Paul. "Mercer County legend Dave Gallagher nearly missed out on a Major League career before it started", The Times (Trenton), July 11, 2014. Accessed August 29, 2015. "Growing up in Hamilton Square, Gallagher came up through the Nottingham Little League and went on to star at Steinert High School in the late 1970s."
  161. ^ Giase, Frank. "Hamilton native Gaven will face Red Bulls, his former team, in MLS Cup", The Star-Ledger, November 19, 2008. Accessed February 22, 2011.
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  163. ^ Pizarro, Max. "Tom Goodwin", New York Observer, August 6, 2007. Accessed January 17, 2018. "Trenton-born Republican Tom Goodwin moved to Hamilton when he was 8.... The 56-year old family man and president of the Hamilton Township Council in 2006, Goodwin is a financial planner who makes the claim, 'I know what a small business goes through.'"
  164. ^ "gary+l.+guear"+Dem. Fitzgerald's Legislative Manual, 2003, p. 264. E. J. Mullin, 2003. Accessed January 17, 2018. "Gary L. Guear, Dem., Hamilton - Mr. Guear was elected Nov. 2, 1999, and was sworn to his first term in the Assembly Jan. 11, 2000. He was re-elected in 2001."
  165. ^ Davis, Mike. "Recently suspended TCNJ football coach Eric Hamilton retires after 37 years", The Times (Trenton), July 19, 2013. Accessed January 20, 2018. "Hamilton also served on the Hamilton Township school board from 1998 until 2012, including terms as board president."
  166. ^ Staff. "Garden Staters will be among the nearly one million deer hun(ters)", Daily Record (Morristown), November 27, 2002. Accessed February 22, 2011. "A bill to allow Sunday hunting in our state, S-2013, has been introduced in the Senate, sponsored by Peter Inverso of Hamilton Township."
  167. ^ Clerkin, Bridget. "Steinert government class leads Hamilton native to White House job", The Times (Trenton), October 15, 2014. Accessed January 17, 2018. "For Brad Jenkins, that journey led from the halls of Steinert High School to the corridors of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. The Hamilton native now is an associate director in the Office of Public Engagement – ;literally the front door of the White House,' he said – finding and inviting various leaders and advocates to Washington to discuss how best to move forward with issues that are important to them, the president and the country."
  168. ^ Battista, Judy. "College Basketball; Rutgers Could Have a Post-Season With Meaning", The New York Times, February 21, 1999. Accessed March 17, 2012. "With his first full recruiting class, one of the best in the Big East, Bannon got Dahntay Jones, a guard from Hamilton Square, N.J., and Rashod Kent, a forward from West Virginia."
  169. ^ CFL.ca Player Profile. Accessed December 17, 2007. "Thaddeus was An All-County and All-Area selection at Hamilton High School West in Trenton [sic], New Jersey"
  170. ^ Assemblyman Paul Kramer, New Jersey Legislature, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 25, 1998. Accessed June 8, 2010.
  171. ^ Jim McKeown, Mercer County Soccer Hall of Fame. Accessed October 2, 2017. "Joining an ever-growing list of booters from Steinert High School, Jim McKeown’s accomplishments on the field earns him a place among the many greats in the Mercer County Soccer Hall of Fame. A product of the Hamilton Township youth programs, Jim was a three-year performer for the Spartans, leading them to the Group IV title in both 1971 and 1973."
  172. ^ Staff. "Draft fulfills an officer's dream", Contra Costa Times, June 17, 2007. Accessed February 22, 2011. "Chris Pittaro, the A's national field coordinator, is a fellow native of Hamilton Township and has known of Johnston since his days in American Legion ball."
  173. ^ Wosh, Peter J. Wosh, Covenant House: Journey of a Faith-Based Charity, pp. 13-35. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005. ISBN 9780812238310. Accessed January 17, 2018.
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  175. ^ Fisher, Rick. "Soccer legend Smith returns to his roots", Community News, November 7, 2014. Accessed November 17, 2018. "Smith is arguably the second-most recognizable Hamiltonian in the world next to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sam Alito.... And yet the 63-year-old Smith still calls Hamilton home, and Mercer County is lucky enough to have him nurturing soccer youth at the Bob Smith Soccer Academy in Robbinsville."
  176. ^ Cannon, Kathleen. "Challenger questions Smith on vets' issues", Burlington County Times, October 10, 2004. Accessed February 22, 2011. "As U.S. Rep. Chris Smith, R-4th of Hamilton Township, this weekend is due to receive an award from the Vietnam Veterans of America, his Democratic challenger, Amy Vasquez of Burlington City, issued a statement criticizing his record on veterans issues."

External links[edit]