Hampton Wick War Memorial

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Hampton Wick War Memorial
England, United Kingdom
Hampton Wick War Memorial Geograph-2507413-by-Rod-Allday.jpg
For Local servicemen who died in the two World Wars
Unveiled 1921
Location 51°24′40″N 0°18′41″W / 51.4112°N 0.3113°W / 51.4112; -0.3113Coordinates: 51°24′40″N 0°18′41″W / 51.4112°N 0.3113°W / 51.4112; -0.3113
Hampton Court Road, Hampton Wick, near Kingston Bridge, London
PARISH OF HAMPTON WICK 1914-1918 TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF THOSE BRAVE MEN OF THIS PARISH WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES FOR THEIR COUNTRY 1939-1945
Listed Building – Grade II
Official name Hampton Wick War Memorial
Designated 19 November 2015
Reference no. 1430664

The Hampton Wick War Memorial is situated on the Hampton Wick side of Kingston Bridge, in the south-west suburbs of London, England. It is found between the bridge and the entrance to Home Park. Several dozen casualties of both world wars are commemorated. Most of these men will have been lost or buried abroad, but a few are buried in the London area. The memorial has been Grade II listed since 2015.[1]

Hampton Wick War Memorial was unveiled on 3 May 1921, commemorating 47 local servicemen who died during the First World War. In 1933 the memorial was floodlit using gas from the Hampton Wick Gas Company. Following the Second World War a further 17 names were added to commemorate those who fell during that conflict.[1]

Some World War One casualties[edit]

Cecil Howard Sivers – 12th Bristol Battalion, the Gloucestershire Regiment. June 1899 to 23 August 1918, died at Pas de Calais, France, burial at Queens Cemetery, Bucquoy Son of Robert and Ethel of 27 Lower Teddington Road, now home to a religious order.

Walter Henry Martin – Serjeant, RAF Son of Mrs Hickman, husband of Edith, died 6 November 1918. Airman in training, he died days before the Armistice and his squadron never entered active service. He is buried at Chingford in Essex, the home of his squadron.

Henry John Doe – 1st Battalion, East Surrey Regiment. April 1895 to 20 July 1916, buried at Serre Rd No 2 Cemetery.

Some World War Two casualties[edit]

Derek William EvesFlying Officer, RAF, VR, 196 Squadron, Special Operations Pilot, Special Air Service (SAS), operating under the Special Operations Executive, separate from Bomber Command. 196 Squadron took part in the D-Day landings and the assault on Arnhem. They liaised with the French Resistance and carried the SAS and were specialists in low-level flying. Derek was the son of William and Ella. He died 9 November 1944, aged just twenty. At this time, his squadron was to prepare for the operation known as "Varsity". Derek Eves failed to return from Operation Draught 7A, over the Zeidersee, Holland.

Leonard Roy Hebberd – D-Day glider pilot, Army Air Corps – S.A.S. He took part in the D-Day landings and died three days later. Exact circumstances unknown because he was an S.A.S. officer. Leonard Hebberd is buried near to Hampton Wick, at Teddington Cemetery, with his mother and father. He died 9 June 1944.

William Timothy Udale – Sergeant, RAF, VR, 86 Squadron, Beaufort Fighter crew, engaged in coastal patrol.
Member of the well-known Udale family of Wolsey Cottage, died 7 September 1941.

See also[edit]

References[edit]