Hancock County, Georgia

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Hancock County, Georgia
Hancock County Courthouse - panoramio.jpg
Hancock County Courthouse in Sparta
Map of Georgia highlighting Hancock County
Location in the U.S. state of Georgia
Map of the United States highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location in the U.S.
Founded December 17, 1793
Named for John Hancock
Seat Sparta
Largest city Sparta
Area
 • Total 479 sq mi (1,241 km2)
 • Land 472 sq mi (1,222 km2)
 • Water 6.8 sq mi (18 km2), 1.4%
Population
 • (2010) 9,429
 • Density 20/sq mi (8/km²)
Congressional district 10th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.hancockcountyga.gov
Thomas Cheely House, ca. 1825

Hancock County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,429.[1] The county seat is Sparta.[2] The county was created on December 17, 1793 and named for John Hancock.[3][4]

Hancock County is included in the Milledgeville, GA Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Before the Civil War, Hancock County's economy was based on growing cotton, and labor was done by slaves. This area is classified as part of the Black Belt of the United States, due to its fertile soil and association with the slave society. Slaves made up 61% of the total county population in the 1850 Census.[5] Unusually for such a plantation-dominated society, the county's representatives at the Georgia Secession Convention, overwhelmingly white and Democratic, voted against secession in 1861.[6]

The secession conventions were dominated by men who voted for separation, and Georgia soon seceded and entered the war.

Race relations[edit]

According to the 2010 census[7] estimate, the racial makeup of the county seat of Sparta was 84% African American, 15% White, 0.50% from two or more races, 0.30% Asian, and 0.10% Native American. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.70% of the population. Most African Americans support the Democratic Party and whites support the Republican Party.

In August 2015, the majority-white Hancock County Board of Elections initiated an effort to purge African-American voters from the rolls. They directed deputy sheriffs to the homes of more than 180 African Americans residing in the county seat of [[Sparta (these constituted some 20% of the city's total registered voters) to inform them they would lose their voting rights unless they appeared in court to prove their residency. A total of 53 voters were removed the voting rolls, but a federal judge overturned the Board's actions.[8]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 479 square miles (1,240 km2), of which 472 square miles (1,220 km2) is land and 6.8 square miles (18 km2) (1.4%) is water.[9]

The western portion of Hancock County, which is defined by a line running southeast from White Plains to the intersection of State Route 22 and Springfield Road, then running southwest along State Route 22, is located in the Upper Oconee River sub-basin of the Altamaha River basin. The southern portion of the county, defined by a triangle made of State Route 22 and State Route 15, with Sparta at its apex, is located in the Lower Oconee River sub-basin of the same Altamaha River basin. The northeastern portion of Hancock County is located in the Upper Ogeechee River sub-basin of the Ogeechee River basin.[10]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1800 14,456
1810 13,330 −7.8%
1820 12,734 −4.5%
1830 11,820 −7.2%
1840 9,659 −18.3%
1850 11,578 19.9%
1860 12,044 4.0%
1870 11,317 −6.0%
1880 16,989 50.1%
1890 17,149 0.9%
1900 18,277 6.6%
1910 19,189 5.0%
1920 18,357 −4.3%
1930 13,070 −28.8%
1940 12,764 −2.3%
1950 11,052 −13.4%
1960 9,979 −9.7%
1970 9,019 −9.6%
1980 9,466 5.0%
1990 8,908 −5.9%
2000 10,076 13.1%
2010 9,429 −6.4%
Est. 2016 8,640 [11] −8.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]
1790-1960[13] 1900-1990[14]
1990-2000[15] 2010-2013[1]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 10,076 people, 3,237 households, and 2,311 families residing in the county. The population density was 21 people per square mile (8/km²). There were 4,287 housing units at an average density of 9 per square mile (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 21.46% White, 77.76% Black or African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.14% from other races, and 0.38% from two or more races. 0.54% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 3,237 households out of which 31.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.00% were married couples living together, 28.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.60% were non-families. 26.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.10% under the age of 18, 9.90% from 18 to 24, 31.00% from 25 to 44, 23.00% from 45 to 64, and 12.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 114.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 118.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $22,003, and the median income for a family was $27,232. Males had a median income of $26,062 versus $19,328 for females. The per capita income for the county was $10,916. About 26.10% of families and 29.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 45.40% of those under age 18 and 25.30% of those age 65 or over. Hancock County is the poorest county in Georgia and the 55th poorest in the country according to per capita income.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 9,429 people, 3,341 households, and 2,183 families residing in the county.[17] The population density was 20.0 inhabitants per square mile (7.7/km2). There were 5,360 housing units at an average density of 11.4 per square mile (4.4/km2).[18] The racial makeup of the county was 74.1% black or African American, 24.4% white, 0.5% Asian, 0.4% American Indian, 0.1% from other races, and 0.6% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.5% of the population.[17] In terms of ancestry, and 25.1% were American.[19]

Of the 3,341 households, 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.8% were married couples living together, 23.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 34.7% were non-families, and 31.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.98. The median age was 43.0 years.[17]

The median income for a household in the county was $22,283 and the median income for a family was $27,168. Males had a median income of $26,837 versus $21,223 for females. The per capita income for the county was $10,925. About 26.7% of families and 26.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 37.3% of those under age 18 and 21.7% of those age 65 or over.[20]

Communities[edit]

Politics[edit]

Previous Presidential Elections Results[21]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 23.6% 843 75.5% 2,701 1.0% 36
2012 18.8% 769 80.9% 3,308 0.3% 13
2008 18.3% 795 81.3% 3,535 0.4% 18
2004 23.1% 822 76.4% 2,715 0.5% 18
2000 21.5% 662 78.2% 2,414 0.3% 10
1996 16.6% 438 80.7% 2,135 2.8% 73
1992 16.0% 506 78.0% 2,461 6.0% 190
1988 24.0% 621 75.2% 1,947 0.8% 21
1984 23.4% 644 76.6% 2,109
1980 20.4% 573 78.5% 2,205 1.1% 31
1976 23.5% 651 76.5% 2,117
1972 51.5% 1,595 48.5% 1,502
1968 10.4% 381 59.3% 2165 30.3% 1,104
1964 46.3% 925 53.7% 1,074
1960 26.8% 286 73.2% 780
1956 29.2% 354 70.8% 860
1952 17.7% 267 82.3% 1,245
1948 28.4% 219 57.1% 441 14.5% 112
1944 22.3% 109 77.7% 380
1940 23.4% 153 76.5% 501 0.2% 1
1936 10.0% 57 88.4% 504 1.6% 9
1932 3.3% 18 96.0% 529 0.7% 4
1928 17.6% 118 82.4% 552
1924 7.1% 22 88.3% 272 4.6% 14
1920 9.6% 53 90.4% 498
1916 3.6% 22 91.5% 562 4.9% 30
1912 6.5% 39 91.4% 549 2.2% 13

Hancock County has arguably been the most consistent Democratic county in the entire nation since the Civil War. It has voted for the Democratic presidential nominee in every election since 1852 except that of 1972, when George McGovern lost every county in Georgia – and even then it was easily McGovern’s best county in the state and he lost by only 93 votes. Apart from Richard Nixon in that election, Barry Goldwater is the only Republican since at least 1912 to reach 30 percent of the county’s vote,[22] and Goldwater did so when the enfranchisement of the county’s African-American majority was highly incomplete and the white minority’s traditional Democratic loyalties were being broken. In 1980 it was Georgia “favorite sonJimmy Carter’s second best county in the nation,[23] whilst in 1984 Walter Mondale, who went within 3,819 votes of losing all fifty states, won over 76.6 percent of Hancock County ballots to make it his fourth-best county outside the District of Columbia.[24]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011. Retrieved June 23, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 148. 
  5. ^ "Census of 1850" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  6. ^ Joslyn, Mauriel (2003). "Hancock County". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council. 
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  8. ^ "Critics See Efforts by Counties and Towns to Purge Minority Voters From Rolls". The New York Times. 31 July 2016. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  10. ^ "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. Retrieved 2015-11-20. 
  11. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  12. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 23, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 23, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 23, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 23, 2014. 
  16. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  17. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-29. 
  18. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-29. 
  19. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-29. 
  20. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-29. 
  21. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  22. ^ Scammon, Richard M. (compiler); America at the Polls: A Handbook of Presidential Election statistics 1920-1964, pp. 97, 100, 103, 106, 109 ISBN 0405077114
  23. ^ Dave Leip’s U.S. Election Atlas; 1980 Presidential Election Statistics
  24. ^ Dave Leip’s U.S. Election Atlas; 1984 Presidential Election Statistics
  25. ^ Beneath Los Angeles. Biddy Mason Verified 2011-02-03.
  26. ^ "New Georgia Encyclopedia entry for William Terrell". Retrieved 2006-12-25. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 33°16′N 83°00′W / 33.27°N 83.00°W / 33.27; -83.00