Handforth

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Handforth
The Peter Herd 'Deli' in the Handforth Precinct - geograph.org.uk - 1534933.jpg
The Paddock (Handforth Precinct)
Handforth is located in Cheshire
Handforth
Handforth
Location within Cheshire
Population6,266 (2011)
OS grid referenceSJ8583
Civil parish
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Historic countyCheshire
Post townWilmslow
Postcode districtSK9
Dialling code01625
PoliceCheshire
FireCheshire
AmbulanceNorth West
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Cheshire
53°21′00″N 2°12′58″W / 53.350°N 2.216°W / 53.350; -2.216Coordinates: 53°21′00″N 2°12′58″W / 53.350°N 2.216°W / 53.350; -2.216

Handforth is a town and civil parish in Cheshire, England, 9 miles (14 km) south of Manchester city centre.[2] The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 6,266.[3] In the 1960s and 1970s, two overspill housing estates, Spath Lane in Handforth[4] and Colshaw Farm nearby in Wilmslow, were built to re-house people from inner city Manchester.[5] It lies between Wilmslow, Heald Green and Styal, in the Cheshire East unitary authority, and forms part of the Greater Manchester Built-up Area.

History[edit]

Handforth, township and hamlet with ry. sta., Cheadle par., E. Cheshire, 5 miles SW. of Stockport, 1311 ac., pop. 736; P.O., T.O.

— John Bartholomew's Gazetteer of the British Isles, 1887, [6]

Handforth's original name was Handforth-cum-Bosden, having resided in the parish of Cheadle in some of its earliest mentions.[citation needed] The name "Handforth" is believed to originate from the Saxon name for a crossing on the River Dean, "Hanna's Ford". The first mention of Handforth is found in a charter dated between 1233 and 1236 CE, with a later mention found in a deed of transfer between Lord Edmund Phitoun and Henry de Honeford, dated to 1291.[a] The settlement is not mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086, though it may have, at that time, been recorded as a component part of the parish of Cheadle.

During the Crusades, Handforth acquired its own Coat of Arms, displaying the Honford Star emblem of Henry de Honeford, a member of the local nobility.[7] The town was referred to as "Honford" in John Speede's map of the area in 1611,[8] also named after the de Honford family.

The oldest building in Handforth is Handforth Hall, a typical Tudor-styled black and white timber building built by Sir Urian Brereton in 1562, also originally named "Honford Hall" after the de Honfords. Sir Urian Brereton, the escheator of Cheshire and one of the privy grooms to King Henry VIII, died at Handforth Hall on 19 March 1577, and is thought to be buried in one of the chapels of St Mary's Church, Cheadle. In the church's south chapel, two recumbent effigies depicted in alabaster are thought to represent members of the Hondford family; Sir John, who died in 1461, and his son, also named John. A third, depicted in sandstone, represents Sir Thomas Brereton, who died in 1673.[9] The most famous resident of Handforth is Sir Urian's great grandson, the Parliamentary General Sir William Brereton, 1st Baronet, who fought in the English Civil War.[10]

During the First World War, an internment camp was set up in Handforth, for both civilian and military prisoners. The site, converted from a disused print works built in 1910 and requisitioned by the War Office in 1914, was designed to hold no more than 3,000 men, and was opened on 6 November 1914 with the arrival of 500 prisoners. From May 1915, following the aftermath of a number of Anti-German riots which swept a number of cities in England, the camp's civilian population increased, following decisions to intern 'enemy aliens', with a number of men sent to Handforth from Liverpool. The camp was inspected by an attaché to the American Embassy in London on 1 April 1916, at which a time there were 2,713 prisoners living in the camp.

At the height of the camp's operations, the interned population of the camp was greater than that of the village of Handforth itself; later in the war, when German soldiers captured from the front lines began to arrive, the local population started to take a greater interest in the camp, and would watch the new arrivals, with crowds gathering at the nearby railway station. The Manchester Evening News reported on 17 March 1915: "Great excitement prevailed at Handforth and Wilmslow today when it became generally known that about 600 German prisoners taken during heavy fighting in the North of France were expected to arrive for internment at the concentration camp."[11][12][13][14]

During the Second World War, Handforth, along with Cheadle Hulme, became home to large parts of RAF Handforth, a maintenance unit classed as a universal stores depot, with the official Royal Air Force name 'RAF Handforth No 61 M.U. (Maintenance unit)'. The depot, which covered large areas of land in both Handforth and neighbouring Cheadle Hulme, opened in 1939 and closed in 1959. The depot's stores spanned every single item required by the RAF in wartime, from utensils and everyday tools to aircraft engines. The site was served by a large, internal railway system, which left the Manchester to Crewe mainline near Handforth railway station; the site of the exchange sidings and junction is now found on the modern-day Epsom Avenue. The depot also featured its own shunting locomotives, which were stored in an engine shed that stood at the Wilmslow bound exit slip road for the Handforth Dean shopping centre. The only surviving buildings of RAF Handforth are the government pay offices, now found on Dairyhouse Lane; these buildings, used as the headquarters of the depot, have survived in Ministry of Defence use to this day.

Greyhound Inn, Handforth, c. 1905 (since demolished)

In January 2017, government plans were announced to build a garden village on the eastern margin of Handforth village, to include 2,000 houses with facilities including a nursery and care home.[15]

Administrative history[edit]

Handforth-cum-Bosden was part of the Stockport Registration District between 1837 and 1877, until it was divided onto the separate parishes of Handforth and Bosden. Handforth continued to be part of the Stockport Registration District from 1877 to 1936, when it was then incorporated into the parishes of Wilmslow and Cheadle and Gatley. The parish of Bosden was abolished in 1900, and incorporated into the parish of Hazel Grove and Bramhall.[16]

Handforth, along with other towns such as Whitworth, Poynton and Alderley Edge, successfully objected to being part of the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester when it was formed in 1974, as a result of plans laid out in the Local Government Act 1972.[17] From 1974 until the changes in local government, which occurred in 2009, Handforth was administered by both the Macclesfield Borough Council and the Cheshire County Council. On 1 April 2009, it became part of the Cheshire East unitary authority.[18]

Geography[edit]

Handforth borders Heald Green to the north and Wilmslow to the south, between the Cheshire Plain and the Pennines.[19] The area lies near the River Dean, a tributary of the River Bollin that flows north–west and eventually joins the River Mersey near Lymm. The local geology is mostly glacial clay, as well as glacial sands and gravel.[20][21]

The majority of buildings in the area are houses dating to the 20th and 21st centuries, with a small number of buildings - such as that of Handforth Hall - dating to before this time.

Climate[edit]

Handforth experiences a temperate maritime climate, like much of the British Isles, with relatively cool summers and mild winters.

Handforth
Climate chart (explanation)
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
 
 
69
 
 
8
−2
 
 
70
 
 
8
2
 
 
50
 
 
10
3
 
 
63
 
 
13
5
 
 
51
 
 
16
8
 
 
58
 
 
19
10
 
 
54
 
 
21
12
 
 
69
 
 
21
12
 
 
63
 
 
18
10
 
 
88
 
 
14
7
 
 
82
 
 
10
4
 
 
78
 
 
7
2
Average max. and min. temperatures in °C
Precipitation totals in mm
Source: Climate-Charts.com
Climate data for Handforth
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 15
(59)
17
(63)
19
(66)
25
(77)
27
(81)
29
(84)
32
(90)
34
(93)
27
(81)
23
(73)
18
(64)
15
(59)
34
(93)
Average high °C (°F) 8
(46)
8
(46)
10
(50)
13
(55)
16
(61)
19
(66)
21
(70)
21
(70)
18
(64)
14
(57)
10
(50)
7
(45)
14
(57)
Average low °C (°F) −2
(28)
2
(36)
3
(37)
5
(41)
8
(46)
10
(50)
12
(54)
12
(54)
10
(50)
7
(45)
4
(39)
2
(36)
6
(43)
Record low °C (°F) −8
(18)
−8
(18)
−8
(18)
−4
(25)
−2
(28)
1
(34)
5
(41)
2
(36)
−1
(30)
−4
(25)
−8
(18)
−12
(10)
−12
(10)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 69
(2.7)
70
(2.8)
50
(2.0)
63
(2.5)
51
(2.0)
58
(2.3)
54
(2.1)
69
(2.7)
63
(2.5)
88
(3.5)
82
(3.2)
78
(3.1)
795
(31.3)
Source: My Weather 2[22]

Physical geography[edit]

The eastern half of Cheshire, in which Handforth is located, is Upper Triassic Mercia Mudstone laid down with large salt deposits, which were mined for hundreds of years around Northwich. Separating this area from Lower Triassic Sherwood Sandstone to the west is a prominent sandstone ridge known as the Mid Cheshire Ridge. A 55-kilometre (34 mi) footpath,[23] the Sandstone Trail, follows this ridge from Frodsham to Whitchurch, passing Delamere Forest, Beeston Castle and earlier Iron Age forts.[24]

The highest point in Cheshire is Shining Tor on the Derbyshire/Cheshire border between Macclesfield and Buxton, at 559 metres (1,834 ft) above sea level. Before county boundary alterations in 1974, the county top was Black Hill (582 m (1,909 ft)) near Crowden, in the far east of the historic county on the border with the West Riding of Yorkshire. Black Hill is now the highest point in West Yorkshire.

Governance[edit]

Handforth is in Cheshire East, a unitary authority area with borough status in the county of Cheshire,[18] and the constituency of Tatton, a strongly Conservative seat represented by Esther McVey.[25] It is the third most affluent constituency in the UK outside of Kensington and Cities of London and Westminster.[25] Before Brexit in 2020, it was also represented in the European Parliament as part of the North West England constituency.[26]

Handforth Parish Council was formed in May 2011; it consists of seven councillors, representing three wards.[27] The parish council gained attention in February 2021, after a heated Zoom meeting of its Planning and Environment Committee went viral.[28][29] This event spawned a number of memes and mainstream media coverage.[30][31] After gaining online traction on the evening of 4 February, attendee Jackie Weaver's name was the highest trending topic on Twitter in the United Kingdom that night and the following day.[32][33] On that day, Weaver appeared on BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour in her first public appearance since gaining online popularity,[34] followed by an appearance on The Last Leg.[35][36]

Demography[edit]

Population[edit]

The historic population of Handforth was 650 in 1851, and 911 in 1901.[37] According to the United Kingdom Census 2011, the Handforth Ward has a population of 9,139 people.[38] This is an increase from the data in the 2001 Census, when the Handforth Ward had a population of 8,014 people. The gender composition of Handforth is made up of 50.8% (4,640) females and 49.2% (4,499) males.[39][40][41]

Historical populations
YearPopulation±%
1831 591—    
1841 681+15.2%
1851 650−4.6%
1861 629−3.2%
1871 662+5.2%
1881 736+11.2%
1891 794+7.9%
1901 911+14.7%
1911 934+2.5%
1921 904−3.2%
YearPopulation±%
1931 1,031+14.0%
1941 -—    
1951 -—    
1961 3,254—    
1971 7,537+131.6%
1981 6,843−9.2%
1991 6,343−7.3%
2001 8,014+26.3%
2011 9,138+14.0%
Source: Cheshire County Council: Township Pack No 48.[42] [43]
Handforth Compared
2011 UK Census Handforth Cheshire East England
Total population 9,138 370,127 53,012,456
White 91.6% 96.7% 85.5%
Asian 4.7% 1.6% 7.7%
Black 0.8% 0.4% 3.4%

Ethnicity[edit]

According to the 2011 Census, ethnic white groups (British, Irish, other) account for 91.6% (8,375) of the population, against 96.8% in the previous 2001 census, with 8.4% (764 people) being in ethnic groups other than white.

Of the 8.4% (764 people) in non-white ethnic groups:

Religion[edit]

According to the 2011 Census, a breakdown of the religious groups and denominations in Handforth showed a majority (79.2% in 2001, 63.5% in 2011) Christian population, with the second-largest recorded group being people with no religion (12.8% in 2001, rising to 24.5% in 2011), followed by Handforth's Muslim population (1% in 2001, rising to 2.7% in 2011):[45]

  • Christian - 79.2% (6,345 people), 2001; 63.5% (5,805 people), 2011
  • No religion - 12.8% (1,026 people), 2001; 24.5% (2,244 people), 2011
  • Religion not stated - 5.9% (473 people), 2001; 6.8% (621 people), 2011
  • Muslim - 1% (82 people), 2001; 2.7% (250 people), 2011
  • Hindu - 0.4% (31 people), 2001; 0.9% (78 people), 2011
  • Jewish - 0.3% (27 people), 2001; 0.4% (36 people), 2011
  • Buddhist - 0.2% (12 people), 2001; 0.3% (28 people), 2011
  • Sikh - 0.1% (8 people), 2001; 0.5% (43 people), 2011
  • Other religions - 0.1% (10 people), 2001; 0.4% (34 people), 2011

Places of worship[edit]

St Benedict's Roman Catholic Church

There are three churches in Handforth:

  • Methodist
    • St Mary's Methodist Church was built in 1872, though Methodism was present in the Handforth and Wilmslow area long before this. It is recorded that John Wesley preached at nearby Finney Green on 1 September 1748.[46]
  • Roman Catholic
  • Anglican
    • St Chad's Church of England, part of the Diocese of Chester, is an Anglican church based in Handforth. During the 19th century, a chapel of ease was built in Handforth, then part of the parish of Cheadle. The chapel was consecrated in 1837 as a chapel to St Mary's Church, Cheadle, becoming the parish church for Handforth and part of Cheadle in 1877. Due to the growth of the population of Handforth in the late 19th century, the chapel went through extensive redevelopment and expansion, and the new building - known as St Chad's Church - was consecrated by Francis Jayne, Bishop of Chester on St Chad's day, 2 March, in 1899.[37][49][50][51]

Transport[edit]

Handforth railway station is on a double-track electrified line that runs from Manchester Piccadilly to Crewe via Levenshulme, Cheadle Hulme, Stockport and Wilmslow.[52] The A34 bypass is situated to the east,[53] and the main thoroughfare is Wilmslow Road (B5358).[54] Manchester Airport lies just 3.5 mi (5.6 km) to the north-west, though Handforth lies away from the airport's approach and departure routes, and therefore suffers only slightly from aircraft noise.[55] Bus 42C runs between Handforth and Manchester city centre, via Cheadle and East Didsbury.

Economy[edit]

Handforth Dean is a retail park that houses shops such as Tesco, Marks & Spencer Outfit and Boots the Chemist, and is situated by the A34 bypass.[56] Pets at Home has its headquarters in Handforth.[57]

Public services[edit]

Health[edit]

Handforth Health Centre, purpose-built in 1975, was purchased from the Health Authority by the GPs in 1992 and completely refurbished.[58]

Schools[edit]

Handforth is served by three primary schools: Handforth Grange (formerly Wilmslow Grange, 1951–2019),[59] Dean Oaks Primary[60] and St Benedict's RC Primary.[61]

Police[edit]

Handforth is served by Cheshire Constabulary, with the closest branch being based in Wilmslow.[62]

Fire[edit]

Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service is the fire service that caters for Handforth, with the nearest fire station being located in Wilmslow.[63]

Facilities[edit]

Pavilion at Meriton Park

Parks[edit]

Meriton Road Park, opened in 1935, covers an area of 3.4 hectares (8.4 acres)[64] and is situated to the rear of the Paddock Shopping Centre. Until the mid-1980s, the park was the site for the Handforth Gala. Current attractions in the park include a multi-sport court, tennis courts and a miniature railway, which is operated by the Handforth Model Engineering Society.

Stanley Hall Park is situated between the Spath Lane Estate and the railway line from Handforth to Cheadle Hulme. The park was donated by Manchester City Council in the early 1960s. The park is owned and maintained by Cheshire East Council's environmental partner Ansa, and has an active 'friends of the park' group.[65] Facilities include the Swingtime play areas and Multi-Use Games Area donated by Spath Lane Residents Association, and a 52-seat all-inclusive picnic area with space for 15 wheelchairs or buggies and a concrete skatepark installed by the Friends of Stanley Hall Park in 2015-16.

Famous Parish Council Meeting[edit]

A meeting of Handforth Parish Council in December 2020 went viral on the internet.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The deed, which relates to the site of a water mill, "assigns a whole half of the water of Honeford between the two highways of which a certain way comes from Wilmyslawe and the other way which comes from Macclisfeld and extends itself beyond said water towards Bolleschawehefd". A copy of the deed is held by the John Rylands Library.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Home Page". www.handforth.org.uk.
  2. ^ "HANDFORTH : latitude, longitude, map and postcode / zip code of Handforth SK9 in United Kingdom". Zip-code.en.mapawi.com. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  3. ^ "Civil Parish population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 13 March 2016.
  4. ^ Google Maps: Handforth (Retrieved 29 November 2014)
  5. ^ Google Maps: Colshaw Farm (Retrieved 29 November 2014)
  6. ^ "History of Handforth, in Macclesfield and Cheshire | Map and description". Visionofbritain.org.uk. 1887. Retrieved 29 November 2014.
  7. ^ Graham Rollason, Handforth Archived 10 November 2011 at the Wayback Machine (Retrieved 4 December 2014)
  8. ^ Map of Cheshire, by John Speed, Published By Basset & Chiswell, 1676 Archived 30 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine (Retrieved 29 November 2014)
  9. ^ Richards, Raymond (1947), Old Cheshire Churches, London: Batsford, pp. 91–93
  10. ^ "Cheshire Magazine". Cheshire Magazine. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  11. ^ "Handforth Internment Camp". merseyside-at-war.org.
  12. ^ 'Handforth, Cheshire East: German Takeover of a Sleepy Village', BBC World War One at Home http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p023084q
  13. ^ 'Handforth Concentration Prison', Diverse Narratives of WWI, http://diversenarratives.com/2015/02/05/handforth-concentration-prison/
  14. ^ 'Prisoners of War and Internees (Great Britain)', International Encyclopaedia of the First World War, http://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/prisoners_of_war_and_internees_great_britain
  15. ^ Jessica Elgot (2 January 2016). "Fourteen garden villages to be built in England totalling 48,000 homes". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  16. ^ "Stockport Registration District". Ukbmd.org.uk. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  17. ^ Local Government Act 1972 (Retrieved 29 November 2014)
  18. ^ a b [1] Archived 27 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  19. ^ Macchi, L. (1990). "A Field Guide to the Continental Permo-Triassic Rocks of Cumbria and Northwest Cheshire". Liverpool Geological Society, Liverpool: 88 pages.
  20. ^ Taylor, B.; Price R., and Trotter F. (1963). "The geology of the Country around Stockport and Knutsford". Memoir of the Geological Survey GB: pp 20–22.
  21. ^ British Geological Survey 1:50K map series sheets 96-98, 108-110, 122,123 and accompanying memoirs
  22. ^ "December Climate History for Handforth | Local | Cheshire, United Kingdom". Myweather2.com. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  23. ^ [2] Archived 2 May 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  24. ^ "Walking Cheshire's Sandstone Trail". Archived from the original on 22 July 2011.
  25. ^ a b "George Osborne | MP for Tatton". Georgeosborne4tatton.com. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  26. ^ "European Election 2009, North West Results". BBC News. 19 April 2009.
  27. ^ "Handforth: Past, Present and Future" (PDF). Handforth Parish Council. p. 3. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 September 2020. Retrieved 5 February 2021. The parish council was formed in May 2011 and comprises seven councillors representing wards in the west (3), east (2) and south (2).
  28. ^ "Foul-tempered (and occasionally sweary) parish council meeting becomes internet hit". Sky News. 5 February 2021. Archived from the original on 5 February 2021. Retrieved 5 February 2021.
  29. ^ "'I'd have got my hair done': Jackie Weaver - star of viral parish council meeting - on becoming an unlikely internet hit". ITV News. 5 February 2021. Archived from the original on 5 February 2021. Retrieved 5 February 2021.
  30. ^ "Chaotic Handforth Parish Council meeting goes viral". BBC News. 5 February 2021. Archived from the original on 5 February 2021. Retrieved 5 February 2021.
  31. ^ Farrer, Martin (5 February 2021). "Insults and expletives turn parish council Zoom meeting into internet sensation". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 5 February 2021. Retrieved 5 February 2021.
  32. ^ Booth, Rich (5 February 2021). "Bizarre Handforth Parish Council Zoom meeting goes viral after descending into chaos". The Independent. Archived from the original on 5 February 2021. Retrieved 5 February 2021. One of the meeting's participants, Jackie Weaver, trended throughout Thursday evening.
  33. ^ Malvern, Jack (5 February 2021). "Chaotic Handforth parish council meeting becomes viral video". The Times. Archived from the original on 5 February 2021. Retrieved 5 February 2021. Jackie Weaver, who hosted the call, became an internet celebrity whose name was the first in Twitter’s list of trending topics this morning.
  34. ^ BBC Woman's Hour [@BBCWomansHour] (5 February 2021). "BBC Woman's Hour on Twitter: "Today on Woman's Hour: We speak to the one and only Jackie Weaver to find out what actually happened at *that* viral #HandforthParishCouncil meeting bbc.in/3cHGKUY"" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  35. ^ Pugh, Rachel (5 February 2021). "Channel 4 viewers in stitches over brand new Jackie Weaver footage". Manchester Evening News. Archived from the original on 5 February 2021. Retrieved 6 February 2021.
  36. ^ Nugent, Annabel (6 February 2021). "The Last Leg viewers praise Jackie Weaver's 'hilarious' appearance on show". The Independent. Archived from the original on 6 February 2021. Retrieved 6 February 2021.
  37. ^ a b "Cheshire Towns & Parishes : Handforth". Ukbmd.org.uk. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  38. ^ Office for National Statistics (Retrieved 29 November 2014)
  39. ^ Office for National Statistics (Retrieved 30 November 2014)
  40. ^ Office for National Statistics, Neighbourhood Statistics (Retrieved 30 November 2014)
  41. ^ Office for National Statistics, Neighbourhood Statistics: Lead View Table (Retrieved 30 November 2014)
  42. ^ Cheshire County Council, Archives and Local Studies, Township Pack, No 48.{{
  43. ^ http://www.handforthnplan.org/resources/handforthPPFA.docx
  44. ^ Office For National Statistics, Neighbourhood Statistics - Ethnic Group, 2011 (Retrieved 2014-08-11)
  45. ^ Office For National Statistics, Neighbourhood Statistics - Religion, 2001 (UV15) (Retrieved 4 December 2014)
  46. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20120425152515/http://www.bramhallmethodists.org.uk/circuit/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=52&Itemid=70. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 19 February 2016. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  47. ^ "Useful Links". St. Benedict's Catholic Primary School. Archived from the original on 30 November 2014. Retrieved 30 November 2014.
  48. ^ Heusel, F.E. (1982) Handforth Through The Ages, Cheshire Libraries and Museums
  49. ^ SRM © 2006. "St Chad's Parish Church, Handforth, Cheshire". Stchadshandforth.org.uk. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  50. ^ Church of England: Diocese of Chester (Retrieved 30 November 2013)
  51. ^ RC Diocese of Shrewsbury (Retrieved 30 November 2013)
  52. ^ [3] Archived 10 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  53. ^ AA Road Book of England and Wales, 4th edition (1953)
  54. ^ B5358, Roader's Digest (Retrieved 30 November 2013)
  55. ^ Manchester (Handforth) Hotel, Premier Inn Official website (Retrieved 30 November 2014)
  56. ^ Handforth Dean: That bit of Handforth that's sort of in Wilmslow..., The Wilmslow Website (Retrieved 30 November 2013)
  57. ^ Ferguson, James (8 July 2011). "Pets at Home expansion plans - 700 new jobs and £5m depot". Manchester Evening News. Trinity Mirror (now Reach plc). Archived from the original on 17 July 2011. Retrieved 9 February 2021.
  58. ^ Handforth Health Centre Official Website (Retrieved 30 November 2014)
  59. ^ "Outstanding school changes name to reflect local pride". Frank Field Education Trust. 12 March 2019. Retrieved 5 February 2021.
  60. ^ Dean Oaks Primary
  61. ^ St. Benedict's RC Primary
  62. ^ Cheshire Constabulary: Eastern BCU Archived 20 October 2011 at the Wayback Machine (Retrieved 30 November 2014)
  63. ^ Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service (Retrieved 30 November 2014)
  64. ^ [4] Archived 22 February 2014 at the Wayback Machine
  65. ^ Reeves, Lisa (12 March 2015). "Handforth park has new 'Friends' - wilmslow.co.uk". www.wilmslow.co.uk. Retrieved 9 February 2021.

External links[edit]