Hangar 9, Brooks Air Force Base

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Hangar 9
Hangar92 (1 of 1).jpg
Hangar 9, Brooks Air Force Base is located in Texas
Hangar 9, Brooks Air Force Base
Hangar 9, Brooks Air Force Base is located in the US
Hangar 9, Brooks Air Force Base
Location Brooks City-Base, San Antonio, Texas
Coordinates 29°20′37″N 98°26′37″W / 29.34361°N 98.44361°W / 29.34361; -98.44361Coordinates: 29°20′37″N 98°26′37″W / 29.34361°N 98.44361°W / 29.34361; -98.44361
Area less than one acre
Built 1918 (1918)
Architect Thomas & Harmon Co.
NRHP reference # 70000895
RTHL # 13363
Significant dates
Added to NRHP May 21, 1970[1]
Designated NHL December 8, 1976[2]
Designated RTHL 1967

Hangar 9 is a historic aircraft hangar at Brooks City-Base, the former Brooks Air Force Base, in San Antonio, Texas. Built in 1918, it is the oldest U.S. Air Force aircraft storage and repair facility, and the only surviving hangar from World War I. The building, now rehabilitated as a special event facility, was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976.[2]

Description and history[edit]

Hangar 9 stands at the northern corner of Inner Circle Road and Challenger Drive on the grounds of the former Brooks Air Force Base. It is a two-story wood frame structure, with a broad gambrel roof supported by massive wooden trusses. The exterior is finished with vertical board siding, its long sides dotted with windows. The north and south facades each have four 16-foot (4.9 m) rail-mounted sliding doors, which originally provided access for the movement of aircraft into and out of the building. The interior is essentially unfinished, with wall studs and roof trusses exposed.[3]

Hangar 9 was one of sixteen similar wood structures built at Brooks Field early in 1918. By the 1960s, only Hangar 9 remained. When, in the 1960s the Air Force proposed Hangar 9's demolition, the Bexar County Historical Society was given permission to restore the building. The building was dedicated as the Edward H. White II Aviation Museum in 1968. The museum, then known as the Edward H. White II Museum of Aerospace Medicine, closed in 2011 with the closing of the base.[4] As part of the base's redevelopment as the mixed-use Brooks City-Base community, it has been restored for use as an events venue, hosting weddings as well as corporate and other events.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b "Hangar 9, Brooks Air Force Base". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Archived from the original on 2009-01-13. Retrieved 2008-06-25. 
  3. ^ "NHL nomination for Hangar 9, Brooks Air Force Base". National Park Service. Retrieved 2018-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Hangar 9, Brooks Air Force Base". National Park Service. Retrieved 23 October 2014. 
  5. ^ "Hangar 9". Live Brooks. Retrieved 2017-01-06. 

External links[edit]