Hannah Devlin

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Hannah Devlin
UK Science Journalists in the 2011 Geek Calendar (cropped).jpg
UK Science Journalists: (left to right) Roger Highfield, Nigel Hawkes, Mark Henderson, Hannah Devlin, Ed Yong, in the 2011 Geek Calendar to support Libel Reform
EducationSt Bede's College, Manchester
Alma materImperial College London (BSc)
University of Oxford (DPhil)
Known forScience journalism
Scientific career
InstitutionsResearch Fortnight
The Times
The Guardian
ThesisPhysiological variability in functional magnetic resonance imaging (2008)
Doctoral advisorPeter Jezzard[1]
Websitetheguardian.com/profile/hannah-devlin

Hannah Devlin an author in London and science correspondent for The Guardian.

Education[edit]

Devlin attended St Bede's College, Manchester, where she studied A-Levels in Maths, Physics, French and General Studies.[2] She completed an undergraduate degree in physics at Imperial College London in 2004[2] She has a Doctor of Philosophy degree in functional magnetic resonance imaging from the University of Oxford for research supervised by Peter Jezzard.[1][3][4] In 2006, whilst Devlin was a DPhil student, she worked for The Times on a British Science Association Media Fellowship.[5] She began her career as a journalist whilst completing her postgraduate studies.[6][7] She was a finalist for the Young Science Writers award.[8]

Career[edit]

Devlin worked for Research Fortnight for a year, before getting a permanent job at The Times in 2009.[2][9][10]

In 2015, Devlin was appointed to The Guardian.[11] She works as the science correspondent for The Guardian,[12] as well as presenting their podcast Science Weekly.[13][14][15] Devlin has also written for the journal Science.[16] In 2017 she gave a keynote talk at the Human Tissue Association's annual conference.[17] She was a contributor to BBC One's TV show, Doctors.[18] She has been shortlisted for the 2017 The Press Awards Science Journalist of the Year.

Devlin is an advocate for women in science.[19] In 2011 she chaired a debate with Athene Donald, Ottoline Leyser and Keith Laws called Women of science, do you know your place?.[20][21] She has contributed opinion pieces such as Why don't women win Nobel science prizes?[22] and Why are there so few women in tech? The truth behind the Google memo.[23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Devlin, Hannah (2008). Physiological variability in functional magnetic resonance imaging. bodleian.ox.ac.uk (DPhil thesis). University of Oxford. OCLC 757052157. EThOS uk.bl.ethos.496847.
  2. ^ a b c "Interview with Hannah Devlin". thescientific23.com. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  3. ^ "Former Students and Post Docs — Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences". www.ndcn.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  4. ^ "What is FMRI? — Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences". www.ndcn.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  5. ^ "The Fellows". British Science Association. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  6. ^ "'Clean' car exhausts that emit toxic gases" (PDF). Glasgow University. 16 April 2007. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  7. ^ "Behind the web of lies". timeshighereducation.com. Times Higher Education. 1 June 2007. Retrieved 2 March 2018. (subscription required)
  8. ^ Highfield, By Roger (21 August 2007). "Shining a light on a world of complexity". ISSN 0307-1235. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  9. ^ Administrator. "Dragons' Den - UK Conference of Science Journalists". www.ukcsj.org. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  10. ^ "Women's Health Archives - A Room of Our Own". A Room of Our Own. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  11. ^ "Media Updates - 5 February | Vuelio". Vuelio. 5 February 2015. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  12. ^ Devlin, Hannah (24 July 2018). "Academic writes 270 Wikipedia pages in a year to get female scientists noticed". theguardian.com. London: The Guardian. Retrieved 24 July 2018.
  13. ^ "Hannah Devlin". the Guardian. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  14. ^ Weekly, The Guardian's Science. "The Guardian's Science Weekly – Podcast". Podtail. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  15. ^ "Dr Hannah Devlin - Oxford Talks". talks.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  16. ^ "Hannah Devlin". Science | AAAS. 14 January 2015. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  17. ^ Human Tissue Authority (HTA) (18 July 2017), Hannah Devlin - HTA conference 2017 'Conversations around death and dying', retrieved 2 March 2018
  18. ^ "Clean, Series 18, Doctors - BBC One". BBC. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  19. ^ "Hannah Devlin - Media Masters". Media Masters. 13 April 2017. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  20. ^ "Women of science, do you know your place?". Research Blogs. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  21. ^ "Different is OK, but inequality is not". 10 August 2007. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  22. ^ Devlin, Hannah (6 October 2017). "Why don't women win Nobel science prizes?". the Guardian. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  23. ^ Devlin, Hannah; Hern, Alex (8 August 2017). "Why are there so few women in tech? The truth behind the Google memo". the Guardian. Retrieved 2 March 2018.