Hanover Township, New Jersey

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Hanover Township, New Jersey
Tuttle House
Tuttle House
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hanover Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hanover Township, New Jersey
Hanover Township is located in Morris County, New Jersey
Hanover Township
Hanover Township
Location in Morris County
Hanover Township is located in New Jersey
Hanover Township
Hanover Township
Location in New Jersey
Hanover Township is located in the United States
Hanover Township
Hanover Township
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°49′12″N 74°25′41″W / 40.81995°N 74.427986°W / 40.81995; -74.427986Coordinates: 40°49′12″N 74°25′41″W / 40.81995°N 74.427986°W / 40.81995; -74.427986[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyMorris
Settled1676
FormedDecember 7, 1720
IncorporatedMarch 25, 1740
Named forHouse of Hanover
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorJohn L. Ferramosca (R, term ends December 31, 2022)[3][4]
 • Administrator / Municipal clerkJoseph A. Giorgio[5]
Area
 • Total10.75 sq mi (27.83 km2)
 • Land10.52 sq mi (27.23 km2)
 • Water0.23 sq mi (0.59 km2)  2.14%
 • Rank204th of 565 in state
16th of 39 in county[1]
Elevation279 ft (85 m)
Population
 • Total14,677
 • Estimate 
(2021)[8][10]
14,640
 • Rank179th of 566 in state
15th of 39 in county[11]
 • Density1,396.1/sq mi (539.0/km2)
  • Rank353rd of 566 in state
22nd of 39 in county[11]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Codes
Area code(s)862/973[16]
FIPS code3402729550[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0882187[1][19]
Websitewww.hanovertownship.com

Hanover Township is a township in Morris County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2020 United States census, the township's population was 14,677,[8][9] an increase of 965 (+7.0%) from the 2010 census count of 13,712,[20][21][22] which in turn reflected an increase of 814 (+6.3%) from the 12,898 counted in the 2000 census.[23] The township comprises the unincorporated communities of Whippany and Cedar Knolls.[14]

Located just north of the historic town of Morristown (separated by a thin strip of Morris Township) and adjacent to the regional Morristown Municipal Airport, Hanover Township offers many public attractions including the Whippany Railway Museum,[24] the Frelinghuysen Arboretum[25] and the Morris County Library. Patriots' Path, a wilderness walkway and bike trail that stretches for 26 miles (42 km), also passes through the township along the Whippany River.[26]

History[edit]

Hanover Township is the site of the first European settlement in northwest New Jersey. New Englanders established a settlement along the Whippany River in 1685 near the current location of the old Whippany Cemetery on Route 10.[27]

Once the Province of West Jersey purchased the land from the local Lenape Native Americans, the original County of Morris was created and comprised all of what is now Morris, Sussex and Warren Counties. The counties were partitioned into townships. Morris' original township was 'Whippenny' which itself comprised all of what is now Morris County.

The name "Hanover" was taken from the House of Hanover in Germany.[28] This namesake was given to the Township of Hanover on December 7, 1720, as a sign of respect to George I of Great Britain who was of the House of Hanover and who ruled over the American colonies in the eighteenth century. Its size has been considerably decreased as the population of the area has increased since the creation of Hanover Township in 1720 and its incorporation on March 25, 1740, with the formation of Morris County.[29][30] Originally encompassing all of Morris County and parts of Sussex and Warren County, Hanover Township became too unwieldy for a single local government to maintain. The Township was subdivided into smaller municipalities that could provide more responsive local control despite placing greater demands on the local tax base to support new facilities for each.

Portions of the township were taken to form Mendham Township on March 29, 1749. Hanover Township was established by the Township Act of 1798 of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Additional portions of the township were taken to form Chatham Township (February 12, 1806), Rockaway Township (April 8, 1844), Boonton Town (March 16, 1866), Mountain Lakes (April 29, 1924), Morris Plains (April 15, 1926), East Hanover Township and Parsippany-Troy Hills Township (which both split off on May 9, 1928).[31][32]

During the Revolutionary War, George Washington and his troops often camped in, and marched through, Hanover Township.

The name Whippany is adapted from the Native American word Whippanong which means “place of the arrow wood".[33]

The old settlements of Monroe and Malapardis were consumed by development and what remains are two communities—Whippany and Cedar Knolls—which are roughly separated by Interstate 287.

The Malapardis area of Cedar Knolls is primarily located around Malapardis Road. A section of Malapardis, even though it is in Hanover Township's borders, has a Morris Plains mailing zip code. Another section of Cedar Knolls is called Trailwood which has a section of its land in a Morris Plains ZIP code, the area closest to American Way.

The Monroe area of Whippany is located around Whippany Road and Cedar Knolls Road, marked by a building in the intersection named Monroe Hall.

Until the post-World War II suburbanization of New Jersey, Hanover Township was a sparsely populated industrial town known for its iron works and paper mills. This industry was driven by the ever-present power of the Whippany River. Over the second half of the twentieth century, the Township became thoroughly suburban.

Lucent Technologies had a large facility in Whippany. The first demonstration of long distance television transmission in the United States took place in 1927, with a transmission that went via wire from Washington, D.C., to New York, and from Whippany to New York using radio.[34]

The Seeing Eye, the first guide dog school for the blind in the United States, was located in Whippany between 1931 and 1966, before moving to its current campus in nearby Morris Township.[35]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 10.75 square miles (27.83 km2), including 10.52 square miles (27.23 km2) of land and 0.23 square miles (0.59 km2) of water (2.14%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Balls Mills, Black Meadows, Cedar Knolls, Eden Mill, Horse Hill, Jefferson, Lee Meadows, Malapardis, Monroe and Whippany.[36]

Hanove Township borders the Morris County municipalities of East Hanover Township, Florham Park, Morris Plains, Morris Township and Parsippany-Troy Hills Township.[37][38][39]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18103,843*
18203,503−8.8%
18303,7186.1%
18403,9095.1%
18503,614*−7.5%
18603,476−3.8%
18703,623*4.2%
18804,13814.2%
18904,4818.3%
19005,36619.8%
19106,22816.1%
19208,53137.0%
19302,516*−70.5%
19402,81211.8%
19503,75633.6%
19609,329148.4%
197010,70014.7%
198011,84610.7%
199011,538−2.6%
200012,89811.8%
201013,7126.3%
202014,6777.0%
2021 (est.)14,640[8][10]−0.3%
Population sources:
1810–1920[40] 1840[41] 1850–1870[42]
1850[43] 1870[44] 1880–1890[45]
1890–1910[46] 1910–1930[47]
1930–1990[48] 2000[49][50]
2010[20][21][22] 2020[8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[31]

2010 census[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 13,712 people, 5,308 households, and 3,790 families in the township. The population density was 1,302.8 per square mile (503.0/km2). There were 5,526 housing units at an average density of 525.0 per square mile (202.7/km2). The racial makeup was 85.53% (11,728) White, 1.01% (138) Black or African American, 0.04% (6) Native American, 10.80% (1,481) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.26% (173) from other races, and 1.35% (185) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.59% (630) of the population.[20]

Of the 5,308 households, 30.9% had children under the age of 18; 61.1% were married couples living together; 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present and 28.6% were non-families. Of all households, 25.1% were made up of individuals and 12.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.12.[20]

22.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 30.0% from 45 to 64, and 18.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.9 years. For every 100 females, the population had 91.8 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 88.1 males.[20]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $100,962 (with a margin of error of +/− $6,654) and the median family income was $115,341 (+/− $10,572). Males had a median income of $76,766 (+/− $2,263) versus $61,441 (+/− $5,321) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $44,123 (+/− $2,675). About 1.5% of families and 2.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.5% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.[51]

2000 census[edit]

At the 2000 United States census[17] there were 12,898 people, 4,745 households and 3,620 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,209.6 per square mile (467.2/km2). There were 4,818 housing units at an average density of 451.8 per square mile (174.5/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 88.79% White, 1.09% African American, 0.05% Native American, 8.71% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.59% from other races, and 0.77% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.50% of the population.[49][50]

There were 4,745 households, of which 32.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.8% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.7% were non-families. 19.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.13.[49][50]

Age distribution was 22.8% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 26.6% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.1 males.[49][50]

The median household income was $84,115, and the median family income was $93,937. Males had a median income of $59,278 versus $40,799 for females. The per capita income for the township was $37,661. About 0.7% of families and 1.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.0% of those under age 18 and 1.4% of those age 65 or over.[49][50]

Arts and culture[edit]

The township is home to the Whippany-based Hanover Wind Symphony, which was established in 1985.[52]

Sports[edit]

Home of the 2017 Junior Pee Wee Division Youth Football National Champions sponsored by the NFL Hall of Fame.[53]

Parks and recreation[edit]

Municipal parks and recreational facilities include:[54]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Hanover Township Hall, Jefferson Rd & Rt 10, August 2007.

Hanover Township is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government, one of 141 municipalities (of the 564) statewide that use this form, the second-most commonly used form of government in the state.[62] The Township Committee is comprised of five members, who are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6][63] A Mayor and Deputy Mayor are selected at the annual reorganization meeting by the committeemen from among the members of the Township Committee.

As of 2022, members of the Township Committee are Mayor John L. Ferramosca (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2024; term as mayor ends 2022), Deputy Mayor Thomas A. "Ace" Gallagher (R, term on committee and as deputy mayor ends 2022), Brian J. Cahill (R, 2023), Ronald F. Francioli (R, 2022), Michael A. Mihalko (R, 2023).[3][64][65][66][67][68][69]

In July 2020, Ronald F. Francioli stepped down as mayor, while retaining his committee seat. John L. Ferramosca moved from deputy mayor and took over as mayor while Thomas A. "Ace" Gallagher was chosen as deputy mayor.[70][71]

Township Hall, which was renovated and enlarged in 2003, is located at the corner of Jefferson Road and Route 10. It contains all Township offices, the Township Municipal Court, the Police Department and the Whippanong Public Library.

The 2014 township budget was $24,927,191.79, with a combined property tax rate in Cedar Knolls of $1.705 per $100 in assessed value and $1.670 for Whippany, reflecting differences in fire district assessments.[72] The Township's NJ Treasury/Taxation code is 1412.

Township services[edit]

The Township has its own Police Department consisting of about 30 officers in addition to a Public Works Department which handles the Township's sanitation and recycling needs. The Cedar Knolls First Aid Squad provides emergency medical coverage for the entire township.[73] Morristown Medical Center, a level-2 regional trauma center, is about three miles away.

There are two combination volunteer/career fire districts in the Township:

  • Whippany Fire District #2 is located on the corner of Troy Hills Road and Route 10. They maintain three pumpers, swift water rescue team vehicle and a hazardous materials response (hazmat) team truck.[74]
  • Cedar Knolls Fire District #3 is located at the corner of Ridgedale and Mountain Avenues. They maintain two pumpers, aerial ladder and the Township's emergency medical services (EMS) ambulance.[75]

The Hanover Sewerage Authority provides sewerage service for the Township. It has a treatment plant located on Troy Road.[76]

Malapardis Park in the Cedar Knolls section of Hanover Township.
Bee Meadow Park in the Whippany section of Hanover Township during the Summer Concert Series.
Central Park in the Whippany section of Hanover Township.

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hanover Township is located in the 11th Congressional District[77] and is part of New Jersey's 27th state legislative district.[21][78][79] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Hanover Township had been in the 26th state legislative district.[80]

For the 118th United States Congress, New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Mikie Sherrill (D, Montclair).[81] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[82] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[83][84]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 27th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Richard Codey (D, Roseland) and in the General Assembly by Mila Jasey (D, South Orange) and John F. McKeon (D, West Orange).[85]

Morris County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners comprised of seven members who are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either one or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election.[86] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[87]: 8  As of 2022, Morris County's Commissioners are Commissioner Director Tayfun Selen (R, Chatham Township, term as commissioner ends December 31, 2023; term as director ends 2022),[88] Commissioner Deputy Director John Krickus (R, Washington Township, term as commissioner ends 2024; term as deputy director ends 2022),[89] Douglas Cabana (R, Boonton Township, 2022),[90] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (R, Roxbury, 2022),[91] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (R, Montville, 2022),[92] Stephen H. Shaw (R, Mountain Lakes, 2024)[93] and Deborah Smith (R, Denville, 2024).[94][87]: 2 [95] The county's constitutional officers are the County Clerk and County Surrogate (both elected for five-year terms of office) and the County Sheriff (elected for a three-year term).[96] As of 2022, they are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (R, Parsippany–Troy Hills, 2023),[97][98] Sheriff James M. Gannon (R, Boonton Township, 2022)[99][100] and Surrogate Heather Darling (R, Roxbury, 2024).[101][102]

Politics[edit]

Politics in Hanover Township are decidedly Republican. No Democrat has made a serious bid for Township Committee since the 1950s.[citation needed]

As of March 2011, there were a total of 9,317 registered voters in Hanover Township, of which 4,356 (46.8%) were registered as Republicans, 1,606 (17.2%) were registered as Democrats, and 3,350 (36.0%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered as Libertarians or Greens.[103]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 61.0% of the vote (4,384 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 38.1% (2,740 votes), and other candidates with 0.9% (67 votes), among the 7,243 ballots cast by the township's 9,782 registered voters (52 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 74.0%.[104][105] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 60.2% of the vote (4,544 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 38.3% (2,894 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (78 votes), among the 7,553 ballots cast by the township's 9,478 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.7%.[106] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 61.2% of the vote (4,474 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 37.5% (2,740 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (69 votes), among the 7,312 ballots cast by the township's 9,226 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 79.3.[107]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 73.3% of the vote (3,337 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 25.4% (1,156 votes), and other candidates with 1.3% (60 votes), among the 4,635 ballots cast by the township's 9,849 registered voters (82 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 47.1%.[108][109] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 64.5% of the vote (3,314 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 27.0% (1,388 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.2% (368 votes) and other candidates with 0.3% (16 votes), among the 5,138 ballots cast by the township's 9,358 registered voters, yielding a 54.9% turnout.[110]

Education[edit]

Public schools[edit]

For pre-kindergarten through eighth grade, public school students attend the Hanover Township Public Schools.[111] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of four schools, had an enrollment of 1,382 students and 129.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.7:1.[112] Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[113]) are Bee Meadow School[114] with 334 students in grades K–5, Mountview Road School[115] with 317 students in grades K–5, Salem Drive School[116] with 242 students in grades K–5 and Memorial Junior School[117] with 478 students in grades 6–8.[118][119]

During the 1998–1999 school year, Bee Meadow School was awarded the National Blue Ribbon School Award of Excellence by the United States Department of Education, the highest award an American school can receive.[120]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Whippany Park High School in the Whippany section of Hanover Township, as part of the Hanover Park Regional High School District, which also serves students from the neighboring communities of East Hanover Township and Florham Park, who attend Hanover Park High School in East Hanover.[121] As of the 2018–2019 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 642 students and 58.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.0:1.[122] The seats on the high school district's nine-member board of education are allocated to the constituent municipalities based on population, with Hanover Township assigned three seats.[123]

Parochial and private[edit]

There are also three private special education schools: The Allegro School,[124] The Calais School[125] and P.G. Chambers School.[126]

Transportation[edit]

Interstate 287 northbound in Hanover Township

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 77.54 miles (124.79 km) of roadways, of which 62.47 miles (100.54 km) were maintained by the municipality, 7.46 miles (12.01 km) by Morris County and 7.61 miles (12.25 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[127]

Interstate 287, Route 10 and Route 24 pass through the Township. Interstate 80, U.S. Route 46 and U.S. Route 202 are nearby.

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit offers local bus service on the 871, 872 and 874 routes, with service between the township and Newark on the 73 route.[128][129] Until 2010, service in the borough was offered on the MCM8 route, until subsidies offered to the local provider were eliminated by NJ Transit as part of budget cuts.[130]

The Whippany Line of the Morristown and Erie Railway, a small freight line, traverses the township. Established in 1895, the line runs from Morristown and runs through East Hanover Township and Hanover Township to Roseland.[131]

Aviation[edit]

Morristown Municipal Airport is a general aviation facility located within Hanover Township, though it is owned by the town of Morristown.[132]

Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark / Elizabeth is the closest airport with scheduled passenger service. It is approximately 20 minutes away via Route 24 and Interstate 78.

Media[edit]

Radio stations WMTR[133] and WDHA[134] have studios and offices located in the Cedar Knolls section of the township.

Economy[edit]

Major employers in Hanover Township include:[135]

Name confusion[edit]

There is some confusion over the place names in Hanover Township which results from the sometimes arcane usage of place names in New Jersey.

Whippany and Cedar Knolls are place names for unincorporated communities. They each have their own ZIP Code and fire department but are otherwise simply neighborhood names. The two each had their own post office until 2011, when flooding from Hurricane Irene destroyed the Whippany post office.

Next to Hanover Township is East Hanover Township which has a neighborhood called 'Hanover'. Also, there is a New Hanover Township and a North Hanover Township in Burlington County, and several other Hanover Townships in Pennsylvania and Michigan. Furthermore, street signs and maps often do not identify Hanover Township but instead indicate one of the place names.

Residents of Whippany and Cedar Knolls have become accustomed to indicating that they live in either Whippany or Cedar Knolls and not in Hanover Township. Some confusion comes from the difference between neighborhood boundaries, and the arbitrary ZIP Code boundaries that do not necessarily coincide with municipal boundaries resulting in township mailing addresses which use place names outside of the township. Whippany's ZIP code is 07981 and Cedar Knolls' is 07927.

Notable events[edit]

On January 5, 2009, five unidentified red lights were spotted in the night sky over Hanover Township and Morris County. The event became nationally known as the Morristown UFO hoax after two residents disclosed how they had used road flares attached to balloons to create the objects seen across the area.[136]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Hanover Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Township Committee, Township of Hanover. Accessed June 24, 2022.
  4. ^ 2022 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed March 1, 2022.
  5. ^ Administration and Township Clerk, Township of Hanover. Accessed June 24, 2022.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 121.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Hanover, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e QuickFacts Hanover township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 28, 2022.
  9. ^ a b c Total Population: Census 2010 - Census 2020 New Jersey Municipalities, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 1, 2022.
  10. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 1, 2022.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Cedar Knolls, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Whippany, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  14. ^ a b Profile Archived 2012-10-04 at the Wayback Machine, Township of Hanover. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  15. ^ Post Offices Archived 2014-10-06 at the Wayback Machine, Township of Hanover. Accessed September 30, 2014.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Whippany, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 30, 2014.
  17. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed April 1, 2022.
  19. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hanover township, Morris County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  21. ^ a b c Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  22. ^ a b Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hanover township Archived 2015-05-30 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  23. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  24. ^ History, Whippany Railway Museum. Accessed September 10, 2013.
  25. ^ Frelinghuysen Arboretum Archived 2007-10-05 at the Wayback Machine, Morris County Parks Commission. Accessed September 10, 2013.
  26. ^ Patriots' Path Archived 2013-09-01 at the Wayback Machine, Morris County Parks Commission. Accessed September 10, 2013.
  27. ^ Staff. "Hanover named best suburb in New Jersey Magazine taps township for honor", New Jersey Hills, March 7, 2001. Accessed September 30, 2014. "The first settlement in what is now Morris, Sussex, and Warren counties occurred along the Whippanong River in Whippany in 1685."
  28. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 31, 2015.
  29. ^ Historical Timeline of Morris County Boundaries Archived December 25, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, Morris County Library. Accessed December 24, 2016. "1740, March 25. Morris County is established. Morris County includes Morris Township, Pequannock (also referred to as Poquanick or Peqannoc), Hanover Township, and 'Morris Town.'"
  30. ^ Profile, Township of Hanover. Accessed December 24, 2016. "Settled in 1676 and incorporated on March 25, 1740, Hanover's historic charm, showcased in the book, Along The Whippanong, is rich and colorful. "
  31. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 193. Accessed October 26, 2012.
  32. ^ Staff. "New Montclair Board Organizes Next Week; C.G. Phillips Only Candidate to Get First Choice Majority--Three Re-elected at Long Branch.", The New York Times, May 10, 1928. Accessed April 13, 2020. "The electorate of the present Hanover Township near here turned out in force today and by a vote of 1,938 to 987 registered its approval of the proposal to split the township into three new townships. The present township will be divided into the townships of Parsippany-Troy Hills, East Hanover and Old Township."
  33. ^ Fariello, L., A Place Called Whippany (2nd ed.) L.A. Sunchild Publishing (2003).
  34. ^ AT&T milestones in TV History, AT&T Corporation. Accessed May 27, 2007.
  35. ^ History, The Seeing Eye. Accessed November 16, 2021. "The Seeing Eye was incorporated in Nashville, Tenn., on Jan. 29, 1929. In 1931, the organization relocated to Whippany, N.J., because the climate in the northeast was more suitable for training dogs."
  36. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  37. ^ Areas touching Hanover Township, MapIt. Accessed February 23, 2020.
  38. ^ Morris County Municipalities Map, Morris County, New Jersey Department of Planning and Preservation. Accessed February 23, 2020.
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