Hans Benno Bernoulli

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Hans Benno Bernoulli
portrait of Hans Benno Bernoulli
Born(1876-02-17)17 February 1876
Died12 September 1959(1959-09-12) (aged 83)
NationalitySwiss
Alma materTechnische Universität München
OccupationArchitect
Spouse(s)Anna Ziegler
Parent(s)Theodor Bernoulli
BuildingsBernoullihäuser in Zurich and Grenchen SO

Hans Benno Bernoulli (17 February 1876 – 12 September 1959) was a Swiss architect and city planner.

Family[edit]

Bernoulli was born in Basel, the son of Theodor Bernoulli, an office clerk. He was descended from the Bernoulli family of mathematicians.[1] The suffragette and feminist Elisabeth Bernoulli (1873–1935) was his sister.

In 1904 he married Anna Ziegler in Berlin.

Career[edit]

He studied architecture at the Technische Universität München and in 1902 started a partnership in Berlin. In 1912 he was appointed "chief architect" for the Basler building industry.

His most important housing development projects were:

  • 1914–1929: Bernoullihäuser in Zürich, (Hardturmstrasse). The Bernoulli houses are named after the architect. These houses are a garden city project, from the 1920s and were meant to be sold without profit to the workers. You will find the Bernoulli houses on Zürich tram line no. 17 between the stations Bernoulli and Hardturm.
  • 1919: Bernoullihäuser in Grenchen SO (Rebgasse 61–67)
  • 1920–1923: residential area Im langen Loh in Basel
  • 1920–1923: residential estate Wasserhaus in the sub-district Neue Welt in Münchenstein, developed in partnership with Wilhelm Eduard Brodtbeck.
  • 1924–1934: Living and residential area Hirzbrunnenareal in Basel

After the Second World War his main projects were in rebuilding the bombed and destroyed cities.

Hans Benno Bernoulli died aged 83 in Basel.

Publication[edit]

Die Stadt und Ihr Boden, Birkhàuser Verlag, 1991[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oettli, Max (2009). "hans+bernoulli"&source=bl&ots=pk98DT Culture Shock, A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette, Switzerland. New York: Marshall Cavendish Corporation. p. 217. ISBN 978 0 7614 0050 9. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  2. ^ "Hans Bernoulli, architect city planner and theoretician".

External links[edit]