Hans Rosenfeldt

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Hans Rosenfeldt (2014)

Hans Rosenfeldt (born Hans Petersson on 13 July 1964) is a Swedish screenwriter, radio presenter, novelist and actor. He co-created the Swedish series De drabbade (2003) and Oskyldigt dömd (2008–09), and created the Scandinavian series The Bridge (2011–2018) and the ITV/Netflix series Marcella (2016–).

Early life[edit]

Hans Petersson was born in 1964 in Borås, Västergötland.[1] He grew particularly tall during puberty and was treated with growth hormone at fourteen years old to limit his growth. He reached his full height of 2.06 metres (6 ft 9 in) at fourteen.[2] He considered a career as a basketball player,[2] and briefly worked as a sea lion trainer at Borås djurpark.[3] He also had jobs as a chauffeur and a teacher before deciding to become an actor.[1] He took on the surname Rosenfeldt – his mother's maiden name – during school, replacing his birth name.[4]

Career[edit]

Rosenfeldt began acting in the late 1980s.[1] In addition to small television roles, he acted with the Gothenburg National Theatre for five years, eventually that he did not enjoy acting. Instead, he applied for a job at the radio program Glädjetåget and soon began writing for television, including the soap operas Rederiet and Tre kronor, in the 1990s.[4]

As a radio personality, he has been a recurring panel member on Sveriges Radio P1's På Minuten for over a decade.[3][4] He has also worked as a television presenter, hosting the game show Parlamentet from 2000 to 2003.[3] In 2007, he co-wrote Sveriges Television's Christmas calendar, En riktig jul. He served briefly as an entertainment management at Sveriges Television, but did not feel suited to the role.[4] Rosenfeldt hosted Sveriges Radio's winter program in 2009 and 2011; the story of the 2009 program was inspired by his mother's experience with dementia.[4]

In 2006, Rosenfeldt was hired by the Swedish production company Filmlance International to create a crime series that was set in both Sweden and Denmark.[5] The result was The Bridge, a Danish-Swedish co-production that focuses on a pair of detectives investigating a series of crimes that take place near the border of the two countries.[5] The show's first season premiered in 2011 and its second season was aired in 2013.[5] The Bridge was an international success,[2] and spawned two adaptations: The Bridge, set on the American-Mexican border,[6] and The Tunnel, set on the British-French border.[7]

Rosenfeldt and his friend Michael Hjorth have written a series of crime fiction novels which center around a forensic psychologist. Their first book, Det fördolda (The Secret), was released in 2010, while its sequel, Lärjungen (Disciple), was published in 2011.[3] Together, they adapted the first two novels in the series into a television miniseries, Sebastian Bergman, which was broadcast in 2010.[4]

Rosenfeldt has recently written the English language detective series Marcella.

Personal life[edit]

Rosenfeldt lives in Täby, Uppland with his wife Lotta. They have three children: Sixten, Alice and Ebba.[1][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Hans Rosenfeldt". World Conference of Screenwriters. 2014. Retrieved 10 January 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c Engman, Pascal (17 September 2013). "Hans Rosenfeldt stoppades i växten". Expressen (in Swedish). Retrieved 10 January 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Hans Rosenfeldt – Vinter 2011" (in Swedish). Sveriges Radio. 27 December 2011. Retrieved 10 January 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Collin, Lars (17 January 2010). "Rosenfeldt har höga ambitioner". Svenska Dagbladet (in Swedish). Retrieved 10 January 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Arentsen, Anneke (5 December 2013). "Interview: Hans Rosenfeldt over zijn misdaadserie The Bridge" (in Dutch). Film1. Retrieved 10 January 2015. 
  6. ^ Stanley, Alessandra (9 July 2013). "Evil Knows No Borders". The New York Times. Retrieved 10 January 2015. 
  7. ^ Frost, Vicky (10 January 2013). "The Bridge becomes the Tunnel in Anglo-French crime thriller remake". The Guardian. Retrieved 10 January 2015. 

External links[edit]